• A precise description of neutrino-nucleus reactions will play a key role in addressing fundamental questions such as the leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy through analyzing data from next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments. The neutrino energy relevant to the neutrino-nucleus reactions spans a broad range and, accordingly, the dominant reaction mechanism varies across the energy region from quasi-elastic scattering through nucleon resonance excitations to deep inelastic scattering. This corresponds to transitions of the effective degree of freedom for theoretical description from nucleons through meson-baryon to quarks. The main purpose of this review is to report our recent efforts towards a unified description of the neutrino-nucleus reactions over the wide energy range; recent overall progress in the field is also sketched. Starting with an overview of the current status of neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments, we formulate the cross section to be commonly used for the reactions over all the energy regions. A description of the neutrino-nucleon reactions follows and, in particular, a dynamical coupled-channels model for meson productions in and beyond the $\Delta$(1232) region is discussed in detail. We then discuss the neutrino-nucleus reactions, putting emphasis on our theoretical approaches. We start the discussion with electroweak processes in few-nucleon systems studied with the correlated Gaussian method. Then we describe quasi-elastic scattering with nuclear spectral functions, and meson productions with a $\Delta$-hole model. Nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions determined through a global analysis are also discussed. Finally, we discuss issues to be addressed for future developments.
  • We present results of our search for X-ray line emission associated with the radiative decay of the sterile neutrino, a well-motivated dark matter candidate, in Suzaku Observatory spectra of the Ursa Minor dwarf spheroidal galaxy. These data represent the first deep observation of one of these extreme mass-to-light systems and the first dedicated dark matter search using an X-ray telescope. No such emission line is positively detected, and we place new constraints on the combination of the sterile neutrino mass and the active-sterile neutrino oscillation mixing angle. Line flux upper limits are derived using a maximum-likelihood-based approach that, along with the lack of intrinsic X-ray emission, enables us to minimize systematics and account for those that remain. The limits we derive match or approach the best previous results over the entire 1--20 keV mass range from a single Suzaku observation. These are used to place constraints on the existence of sterile neutrinos with given parameters in the general case and in the case where they are assumed to constitute all of the dark matter. The range allowed implies that sterile neutrinos remain a viable candidate to make up some -- or all -- of the dark matter and also explain pulsar kicks and various other astrophysical phenomena.
  • We report the discovery of active star formation in Digel's Cloud 2, which is one of the most distant giant molecular clouds known in the extreme outer Galaxy (EOG). At the probable Galactic radius of ~20 kpc, Cloud 2 has a quite different environment from that in the solar neighborhood, including lower metallicity, much lower gas density, and small or no perturbation from spiral arms. With new wide-field near-infrared (NIR) imaging that covers the entire Cloud 2, we discovered two young embedded star clusters located in the two dense cores of the cloud. Using our NIR and 12CO data as well as HI, radio continuum, and IRAS data in the archives, we discuss the detailed star formation processes in this unique environment. We show clear evidences of a sequential star formation triggered by the nearby huge supernova remnant, GSH 138-01-94. The two embedded clusters show a distinct morphology difference: the one in the northern molecular cloud core is a loose association with isolated-mode star formation, while the other in the southern molecular cloud core is a dense cluster with cluster-mode star formation. We propose that high compression by the combination of the SNR shell and an adjacent shell caused the dense cluster formation in the southern core. Along with the low metallicity range of the EOG, we suggest that EOG could be an excellent laboratory for the study of star formation processes, such as those triggered by supernovae, that occured during an early epoch of the Galaxy's formation. In particular, the study of the EOG may shed light on the origin and role of the thick disk, whose metallicity range matches with that of the EOG well.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) must originate from low baryon load, ultrarelativistic outflows; however, slower, more baryon-rich outflows (BROs) should also arise in connection with GRBs as ``circum-jet winds'' and/or ``failed GRBs''. We study the possibility of nucleosynthesis within such BROs by conducting detailed reaction network calculations in the framework of the fireball model, showing that they can be interesting sites for synthesis of heavy neutron capture elements, as well as of light elements such as deuterium. These products may be observable in the companion stars of black hole binary systems or in extremely metal-poor stars, offering an interesting probe of conditions in the central engine.
  • Effects of electron correlation on the Fermi surface is investigated for the two-dimensional Hubbard model by the quantum Monte Carlo method. At first, an infinitesimal doping from the half filling is focused on and the momentum dependent charge susceptibility $\kappa(k)=\frac {dn(k)}{d\mu}$ is calculated at a finite temperature. At the temperature $T \sim \frac {t^2} U$, it shows peak structure at $(\pm \pi/2,\pm \pi/2)$ on the Fermi surface (line). It is consistent with the mean-field prediction of the d-wave pairing state or the staggerd flux state. This momentum dependent structure disappears at the high temperature $T \approx U$. After summarizing the results of the half filling case, we also discuss the effects of the doping on the momentum dependent charge susceptibility. The anisotropic structure at half filling fades out with sufficient doping.
  • We investigate anisotropic charge fluctuations in the two-dimensional Hubbard model at half filling. By the quantum Monte Carlo method, we calculate a momentum-resolved charge compressibility $\kappa (\bm{k}) = {d < n(\bm{k}) >}/{d \mu}$, which shows effects of an infinitesimal doping. At the temperature $T \sim {t^2}/{U}$, $\kappa (\bm{k})$ shows peak structure at the $(\pm \pi/2,\pm \pi/2)$ points along the $|k_x| + |k_y| = \pi$ line. A similar peak structure is reproduced in the mean-filed calculation for the d-wave pairing state or the staggered flux state.
  • Observations of the Type II-P (plateau) Supernova (SN) 1999em and Type IIn (narrow emission line) SN 1998S have enabled estimation of the profile of the SN ejecta, the structure of the circumstellar medium (CSM) established by the pre-SN stellar wind, and the nature of the shock interaction. SN 1999em is the first Type II-P detected at both X-ray and radio wavelengths. The Chandra X-ray data indicate non-radiative interaction of SN ejecta with a power-law density profile (rho \propto r^{-n} with n ~ 7) with a pre-SN wind with a low mass-loss rate of ~2 \times 10^{-6} M_sun/yr for a wind velocity of 10 km/sec, in agreement with radio mass-loss rate estimates. The Chandra data show an unexpected, temporary rise in the 0.4--2.0 keV X-ray flux at ~100 days after explosion. SN 1998S, at an age of >3 years, is still bright in X-rays and is increasing in flux density at cm radio wavelengths. Spectral fits to the Chandra data show that many heavy elements (Ne, Al, Si, S, Ar, and Fe) are overabundant with respect to solar values. We compare the observed elemental abundances and abundance ratios to theoretical calculations and find that our data are consistent with a progenitor mass of approximately 15-20 M_sun if the heavy element ejecta are radially mixed out to a high velocity. If the X-ray emission is from the reverse shock wave region, the supernova density profile must be moderately flat at a velocity ~10^4 km/sec, the shock front is non-radiative at the time of the observations, and the mass-loss rate is 1-2 \times 10^{-4} M_sun/yr for a pre-supernova wind velocity of 10 km/sec. This result is also supported by modeling of the radio emission which implies that SN 1998S is surrounded by a clumpy or filamentary CSM established by a high mass-loss rate, ~2 \times 10^{-4} M_sun/yr, from the pre-supernova star.
  • In the absence of Gribov complications, the modified gauge fixing in gauge theory $ \int{\cal D}A_{\mu}\{\exp[-S_{YM}(A_{\mu})-\int f(A_{\mu})dx] /\int{\cal D}g\exp[-\int f(A_{\mu}^{g})dx]\}$ for example, $f(A_{\mu})=(1/2)(A_{\mu})^{2}$, is identical to the conventional Faddeev-Popov formula $\int{\cal D}A_{\mu}\{\delta(D^{\mu}\frac{\delta f(A_{\nu})}{\delta A_{\mu}})/\int {\cal D}g\delta(D^{\mu}\frac{\delta f(A_{\nu}^{g})} {\delta A_{\mu}^{g}})\}\exp[-S_{YM}(A_{\mu})]$ if one takes into account the variation of the gauge field along the entire gauge orbit. Despite of its quite different appearance,the modified formula defines a local and BRST invariant theory and thus ensures unitarity at least in perturbation theory. In the presence of Gribov complications, as is expected in non-perturbative Yang-Mills theory, the modified formula is equivalent to the conventional formula but not identical to it:Both of the definitions give rise to non-local theory in general and thus the unitarity is not obvious. Implications of the present analysis on the lattice regularization are briefly discussed.
  • Random Dirac fermions in a two-dimensional space are studied numerically. We realize them on a square lattice using the $\pi$-flux model with random hopping. The system preserves two symmetries, the time-reversal symmetry and the symmetry denoted by ${{\cal H},\gamma}=0$ with a $4\times 4$ matrix $\gamma $ in an effective field theory. Although it belongs to the orthogonal ensemble, the zero-energy states do not localize and become critical. The density of states vanishes at zero energy as $\sim E^{\alpha}$ and the exponent $\alpha$ changes with strength of the randomness, which implies the existence of the critical line. Rapid growth of the localization length near zero energy is suggested and the eigenstates near zero energy exhibit anomalous behaviour which can be interpreted as a critical slowing down in the available finite-size system. The level-spacing distributions close to zero energy deviate from both the Wigner surmise and the Poissonian, and exhibit critical behaviour which reflects the existence of critical states at zero energy.
  • Evolutionary models of elliptical galaxies are constructed by using a new population synthesis code. Model parameters are calibrated to reproduce the observed colour-magnitude (CM) relation of Coma ellipticals in $V-K$ vs. $M_{V}$ diagram. The SEDs are degenerated in stellar age and metallicity. An attempt is performed to break this degeneracy, by simulating evolution of the CM relation of elliptical galaxies, based on the two alternative interpretations; i.e., the CM relation reflects different mean stellar age or various stellar metallicity. A confrontation with the CM diagrams of E/S0 galaxies in the two distant clusters Abell 2390 ($z=0.228$) and Abell 851 ($z=0.407$) reinsures previous contentions that the CM relation is primarily a metallicity effect. This conclusion does not depend either on the model parameters, or on the cosmological parameters adopted.