• We present timing solutions for ten pulsars discovered in 350 MHz searches with the Green Bank Telescope. Nine of these were discovered in the Green Bank Northern Celestial Cap survey and one was discovered by students in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory program in analysis of drift-scan data. Following discovery and confirmation with the Green Bank Telescope, timing has yielded phase-connected solutions with high precision measurements of rotational and astrometric parameters. Eight of the pulsars are slow and isolated, including PSR J0930$-$2301, a pulsar with nulling fraction lower limit of $\sim$30\% and nulling timescale of seconds to minutes. This pulsar also shows evidence of mode changing. The remaining two pulsars have undergone recycling, accreting material from binary companions, resulting in higher spin frequencies. PSR J0557$-$2948 is an isolated, 44 \rm{ms} pulsar that has been partially recycled and is likely a former member of a binary system which was disrupted by a second supernova. The paucity of such so-called `disrupted binary pulsars' (DRPs) compared to double neutron star (DNS) binaries can be used to test current evolutionary scenarios, especially the kicks imparted on the neutron stars in the second supernova. There is some evidence that DRPs have larger space velocities, which could explain their small numbers. PSR J1806+2819 is a 15 \rm{ms} pulsar in a 44 day orbit with a low mass white dwarf companion. We did not detect the companion in archival optical data, indicating that it must be older than 1200 Myr.
  • We present high-resolution (0.3'') ALMA 870um imaging of 52 sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field and investigate the size and morphology of the sub-millimeter (sub-mm) emission on 2-10kpc scales. We derive a median intrinsic angular size of FWHM=0.30$\pm$0.04'' for the 23 SMGs in the sample detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) >10. Using the photometric redshifts of the SMGs we show that this corresponds to a median physical half-light diameter of 2.4$\pm$0.2kpc. A stacking analysis of the SMGs detected at an SNR <10 shows they have sizes consistent with the 870um-bright SMGs in the sample. We compare our results to the sizes of SMGs derived from other multi-wavelength studies, and show that the rest-frame ~250um sizes of SMGs are consistent with studies of resolved 12CO (J=3-2 to 7-6) emission lines, but that sizes derived from 1.4GHz imaging appear to be approximately two times larger on average, which we attribute to cosmic ray diffusion. The rest-frame optical sizes of SMGs are around four times larger than the sub-millimeter sizes, indicating that the star formation in these galaxies is compact relative to the pre-existing stellar distribution. The size of the starburst region in SMGs is consistent with the majority of the star formation occurring in a central region, a few kpc in extent, with a median star formation rate surface density of 90$\pm$30Msol/yr/kpc$^2$, which may suggest that we are witnessing an intense period of bulge growth in these galaxies.
  • We survey the present landscape in submillimetre astronomy for Canada and describe a plan for continued engagement in observational facilities to ~2020. Building on Canada's decadal Long Range Plan process, we emphasize that continued involvement in a large, single-dish facility is crucial given Canada's substantial investment in ALMA and numerous PI-led submillimetre experiments. In particular, we recommend: i) an extension of Canadian participation in the JCMT until at least the unique JCMT Legacy Survey program is able to realize the full scientific potential provided by the world-leading SCUBA-2 instrument; and ii) involvement of the entire Canadian community in CCAT, with a large enough share in the partnership for Canadian astronomers to participate at all levels of the facility. We further recommend continued participation in ALMA development, involvement in many focused PI-led submillimetre experiments, and partnership in SPICA.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey is a multiwavelength photometric and spectroscopic survey, using the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope to obtain spectra for up to ~300000 galaxies over 280 square degrees, to a limiting magnitude of r_pet < 19.8 mag. The target galaxies are distributed over 0<z<0.5 with a median redshift of z~0.2, although the redshift distribution includes a small number of systems, primarily quasars, at higher redshifts, up to and beyond z=1. The redshift accuracy ranges from sigma_v~50km/s to sigma_v~100km/s depending on the signal-to-noise of the spectrum. Here we describe the GAMA spectroscopic reduction and analysis pipeline. We present the steps involved in taking the raw two-dimensional spectroscopic images through to flux-calibrated one-dimensional spectra. The resulting GAMA spectra cover an observed wavelength range of 3750<lambda<8850 A at a resolution of R~1300. The final flux calibration is typically accurate to 10-20%, although the reliability is worse at the extreme wavelength ends, and poorer in the blue than the red. We present details of the measurement of emission and absorption features in the GAMA spectra. These measurements are characterised through a variety of quality control analyses detailing the robustness and reliability of the measurements. We illustrate the quality of the measurements with a brief exploration of elementary emission line properties of the galaxies in the GAMA sample. We demonstrate the luminosity dependence of the Balmer decrement, consistent with previously published results, and explore further how Balmer decrement varies with galaxy mass and redshift. We also investigate the mass and redshift dependencies of the [NII]/Halpha vs [OIII]/Hbeta spectral diagnostic diagram, commonly used to discriminate between star forming and nuclear activity in galaxies.
  • We present a new high-resolution study of pre-protocluster regions in tracers exclusively probing the coldest and dense gas (NH_2D). The data are used to constrain the chemical, thermal, kinematic, and physical conditions (i.e., densities) in G29.96e and G35.20w. NH_3, NH_2D, and continuum emission were mapped using the VLA, and PdBI. In particular, NH_2D is a unique tracer of cold, precluster gas at high densities, while NH_3 traces both the cold and warm gas of modest-to-high densities. In G29.96e, Spitzer images reveal two massive filaments, one of them in extinction (infrared dark cloud). We observe very low line widths in NH_3 (FWHM <1km/s). These multi-wavelength, high-resolution observations of high-mass pre-protocluster regions show that the target regions are characterized by (i) turbulent Jeans fragmentation of massive clumps into cores (from a Jeans analysis); (ii) cores and clumps that are "over-bound/subvirial", i.e. turbulence is too weak to support them against collapse, meaning that (iii) some models of monolithic cloud collapse are quantitatively inconsistent with data; (iv) accretion from the core onto a massive star, which can (for observed core sizes and velocities) be sustained by accretion of envelope material onto the core, suggesting that (similar to competitive accretion scenarios) the mass reservoir for star formation is not necessarily limited to the natal core; (v) high deuteration ratios ([NH_2D/NH_3]>6%), which make the above discoveries possible; (vi) and the destruction of NH_2D toward embedded stars. [abridged]
  • UltraCompact HII regions are signposts of high mass star formation. Since high-mass star formation occurs in clusters, one expects to find even earlier phases of massive star formation in the vicinity of UltraCompact HII regions. Here, we study the amount of deuteration and depletion toward pre/protocluster clumps found in a wide-field (10 X 10 arcmin) census of clouds in 32 massive star-forming regions that are known to harbour UCHII regions. We find that 65% of the observed sources have strong NH2D emission and more than 50% of the sources exhibit a high degree of deuteration, (0.1 < NH2D/NH3 < 0.7), 0.7 being the highest observed deuteration of NH3 reported to date. Our search for NHD2 in two sources did not result in a detection. The enhancement in deuteration coincides with moderate CO depletion onto dust grains. There is no evidence of a correlation between the two processes, though an underlying correlation cannot be ruled out as the depletion factor is very likely to be only a lower limit. In summary, we find CO depletion and high deuteration towards cold cores in massive star forming regions. Therefore, these are good candidates for sources at the early phases of massive star formation. While our sensitive upper limits on NHD2 do not prove the predictions of the gas-phase and grain chemistry models wrong, an enhancement of ~10^4 over the cosmic D/H ratio from NH2D warrants explanation.
  • We report the parallax and proper motion of millisecond pulsar J0030+0451, one of thirteen known isolated millisecond pulsars in the disk of the Galaxy. We obtained more than 6 years of monthly data from the 305 m Arecibo telescope at 430 MHz and 1410 MHz. We measure the parallax of PSR J0030+0451 to be 3.3 +/- 0.9 mas, corresponding to a distance of 300 +/- 90 pc. The Cordes and Lazio (2002) model of galactic electron distribution yields a dispersion measure derived distance of 317 pc which agrees with our measurement. We place the pulsar's transverse space velocity in the range of 8 to 17 km/s, making this pulsar one of the slowest known. We perform a brief census of velocities of isolated versus binary millisecond pulsars. We find the velocities of the two populations are indistinguishable. However, the scale height of the binary population is twice that of the isolated population and the luminosity functions of the two populations are different. We suggest that the scale height difference may be an artifact of the luminosity difference.