• We show that a Quark-Nova (QN; the explosive transition of a neutron star to a quark star) occurring a few days following the supernova explosion of an Oxygen-type Wolf-Rayet (WO) star can account for the intriguing features of ASASSN-15lh, including its extreme energetics, its double-peaked light-curve and the evolution of its photospheric radius and temperature. A two-component configuration of the homologously expanding WO remnant (an extended envelope and a compact core) is used to harness the kinetic energy (>10^52 ergs) of the QN ejecta. The delay between the WO SN and the QN yields a large (~ 10^4 Rsun) envelope which when energized by the QN ejecta/shock gives the first peak in our model. As the envelope's photosphere recedes into the slowly expanding, hot and insulated, denser core (initially heated by the QN shock) a second hump emerges. The spectrum in our model should reflect the composition of an WO SN remnant re-heated by a QN going off in its wake.
  • Ouyed et al. (1998) proposed Deuterium (DD) fusion at the core-mantle interface of giant planets as a mechanism to explain their observed heat excess. But rather high interior temperatures (~10^5 K) and a stratified D layer are needed, making such a scenario unlikely. In this paper, we re-examine DD fusion, with the addition of screening effects pertinent to a deuterated core containing ice and some heavy elements. This alleviates the extreme temperature constraint and removes the requirement of a stratified D layer. As an application, we propose that, if their core temperatures are a few times 10^4 K and core composition is chemically inhomogeneous, the observed inflated size of some giant exoplanets ("hot Jupiters") may be linked to screened DD fusion occurring deep in the interior. Application of an analytic evolution model suggests that the amount of inflation from this effect can be important if there is sufficient rock-ice in the core, making DD fusion an effective extra internal energy source for radius inflation. The mechanism of screened DD fusion, operating in the above temperature range, is generally consistent with the trend in radius anomaly with planetary equilibrium temperature $T_{\rm eq}$, and also depends on planetary mass. Although we do not consider the effect of incident stellar flux, we expect that a minimum level of irradiation is necessary to trigger core erosion and subsequent DD fusion inside the planet. Since DD fusion is quite sensitive to the screening potential inferred from laboratory experiments, observations of inflated hot Jupiters may help constrain screening effects in the cores of giant planets.
  • The explosive transition of a massive neutron star to a quark star (the Quark-Nova, QN) releases in excess of ~ 10^52 erg in kinetic energy which can drastically impact the surrounding environment of the QN. A QN is triggered when a neutron star gains enough mass to reach the critical value for quark deconfinement to happen in the core. In binaries, a neutron star has access to mass reservoirs (e.g. accretion from a companion or from a Common Envelope, CE). We explain observed light-curves of hydrogen-poor superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe Ia) in the context of a QN occurring in the second CE phase of a massive binary. In particular this model gives good fits to light-curves of SLSNe with double-humped light-curves. Our model suggests the QN as a mechanism for CE ejection and that they be taken into account during binary evolution. In a short period binary with a white dwarf companion, the neutron star can quickly grow in mass and experience a QN event. Part of the QN ejecta collides with the white dwarf, shocking, compressing, and heating it to driving a thermonuclear runaway producing a SN Ia impostor (a QN-Ia). Unlike "normal" Type Ia supernovae where no compact remnant is formed, a QN-Ia produces a quark star undergoing rapid spin-down providing additional power along with the 56Ni decay energy. Type Ia SNe are used as standard candles and contamination of this data by QNe-Ia can infer an incorrect cosmology.
  • Quark-novae leave behind quark stars with a surrounding metal-rich fall-back (ring-like) material. These compact remnants have high magnetic fields and are misconstrued as magnetars; however, several observational features allow us to distinguish a quark star (left behind by a quark-nova) from a neutron star with high magnetic field. In our model, bursting activity is expected from intermittent accretion events from the surrounding fall-back debris leading to X-ray bursts (in the case of a Keplerian ring) or gamma ray bursts (in the case of a co-rotating shell). The details of the spectra are described by a constant background X-ray luminosity from the expulsion of magnetic flux tubes which will be temporarily buried by bursting events caused by accretion of material onto the quark star surface. These accretion events emit high energy photons and heat up the quark star and surrounding debris leading to hot spots which may be observable as distinct blackbodies. Additionally, we explain observed spectral line features as atomic lines from r-process material and explain an observed anti-glitch in an AXP as the transfer of angular momentum from a surrounding Keplerian disk to the quark star.
  • A Quark-Nova (QN, the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star) which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary (Ouyed et al., 2015a&b), gives excellent fits to super-luminous, hydrogen-poor, Supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands solar radii, this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of 8 SLSNe Ic with double-humped light-curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these with a universal explosive energy of 2x10^52 erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e first) CE.
  • The spatial and the angular variants of the Goos-H\"anchen (GH) and the Imbert-Federov (IF) beam shifts contribute in a complex interrelated way to the resultant beam shift in partial reflection at planar dielectric interfaces. Here, we show that the angular GH and the two variants of the IF effects can be decoupled, amplified and separately observed by weak value amplification and subsequent conversion of spatial$\leftrightarrow$angular nature of the beam shifts using appropriate pre and post selection of polarization states. We experimentally demonstrate such decoupling and illustrate various other intriguing manifestations of weak measurements by employing optimized pre and post selections (based on the eigen polarization states of the shifts) elliptical and / or linear polarization basis. The demonstrated ability to amplify, controllably decouple or combine the beam shifts via weak measurements may prove to be valuable for understanding the different physical contributions of the effects and for their applications in sensing and precision metrology
  • LSQ14bdq and SN 2006oz are super-luminous, hydrogen-poor, SNe with double-humped light curves. We show that a Quark-Nova (QN; explosive transition of the neutron star to a quark star) occurring in a massive binary, experiencing two Common Envelope (CE) phases, can quantitatively explain the light curves of LSQ14bdq and SN 2006oz. The more massive component (A) explodes first as a normal SN, yielding a Neutron Star which ejects the hydrogen envelope of the companion when the system enters its first CE phase. During the second CE phase, the NS spirals into and inflates the second He-rich CE. In the process it gains mass and triggers a Quark-Nova, outside of the CO core, leaving behind a Quark Star. The first hump in our model is the QN shock re-energizing the expanded He-rich CE. The QN occurs when the He-rich envelope is near maximum size (~ 1000R_sun) and imparts enough energy to unbind and eject the envelope. Subsequent merging of the Quark Star with the CO core of component B, driven by gravitational radiation, turns the Quark star to a Black Hole. The ensuing Black Hole accretion provides sufficient power for the second brighter and long lasting hump. Our model suggests a possible connection between SLSNe-I and type Ic-BL SNe which occur when the Quark Nova is triggered inside the CO core. We estimate the rate of QNe in massive binaries during the second CE phase to be ~ 5x10^(-5) of that of core-collapse SNe.
  • We show that by appealing to a Quark-Nova (the explosive transition of a neutron star to a quark star) occurring in an He-HMXB system we can account for the lightcurve of the first superluminous SN, DES13S2cmm, discovered by the Dark-Energy Survey. The neutron star's explosive conversion is triggered as a result of accretion during the He-HMXB second Common Envelope phase. The dense, relativistic, Quark-Nova ejecta in turn energizes the extended He-rich Common Envelope in an inside-out shock heating process. We find an excellent fit (reduced chi^2 of 1.09) to the bolometric light-curve of SN DES13S2cmm including the late time emission, which we attribute to Black Hole accretion following the conversion of the Quark Star to a Black hole.
  • Burn-UD is a hydrodynamic combustion code used to model the phase transition of hadronic to quark matter with particular application to the interior of neutron stars. Burn-UD models the flame micro-physics for different equations of state (EoS) on both sides of the interface, i.e. for both the ash (up-down-strange quark phase) and the fuel (up-down quark phase). It also allows the user to explore strange quark seeding produced by different processes including DM annihilation inside neutron stars. The simulations provide a physical window to diagnose whether the combustion process will simmer quietly and slowly, lead to a transition from deflagration to detonation or a (quark) core-collapse explosion. Such an energetic phase transition (a Quark-Nova) would have consequences in high-energy astrophysics and could aid in our understanding of many still enigmatic astrophysical transients. Furthermore, having a precise understanding of the phase transition dynamics for different EoSs could aid further in constraining the nature of the non-perturbative regimes of QCD in general. We hope that Burn-UD will evolve into a platform/software to be used and shared by the QCD community exploring the phases of Quark Matter and astrophysicists working on Compact Stars.
  • We show that the low-velocity 56Ni decay lines detected earlier than expected in the type Ia SN 2014J find an explanation in the Quark-Nova Ia model which involves the thermonuclear explosion of a tidally disrupted sub-Chandrasekhar White Dwarf in a tight Neutron-Star-White-Dwarf binary system. The explosion is triggered by impact from the Quark-Nova ejecta on the WD material; the Quark-Nova is the explosive transition of the Neutron star to a Quark star triggered by accretion from a CO torus (the circularized WD material). The presence of a compact remnant (the Quark Star) provides: (i) an additional energy source (spin-down power) which allows us to fit the observed light-curve including the steep early rise; (ii) a central gravitational potential which slows down some of the 56Ni produced to velocities of a few 1000 km/s. In our model, the 56Ni decay lines become optically visible at ~20 days from explosion time in agreement with observations. We list predictions that can provide important tests for our model.
  • We show that the explosive transition of the neutron star (NS) to a quark star (QS) (a Quark Nova) in Cassiopeia A (Cas A) a few days following the SN proper can account for several of the puzzling kinematic and nucleosynthetic features observed. The observed decoupling between Fe and 44Ti and the lack of Fe emission within 44Ti regions is expected in the QN model owing to the spallation of the inner SN ejecta by the relativistic QN neutrons. Our model predicts the 44Ti to be more prominent to the NW of the central compact object (CCO) than in the SE and little of it along the NE-SW jets, in agreement with NuStar observations. Other intriguing features of Cas A such as the lack of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and the reported a few percent drop of the CCO temperature over a period of 10 years are also addressed.
  • In the Quark-Nova model, AXPs are quark stars surrounded by a degenerate iron-rich Keplerian ring (a few stellar radii away). AXP bursts are caused by accretion of chunks from the inner edge of the ring following magnetic field penetration. For bright bursts, the inner disk is prone to radiation induced warping which can tilt it into counter-rotation (i.e. retrograde). For AXP 1E2259+586, the 2002 burst satisfies the condition for the formation of a retrograde inner ring. We hypothesize the 2002 burst reversed the inner ring setting the scene for the 2012 outburst and "anti-glitch" when the retrograde inner ring was suddenly accreted leading to the basic observed properties of the 2012 event.
  • In 1982, Monique and Francois Spite discovered that the 7Li abundance in the atmosphere of old metal-poor dwarf stars in the galactic halo was independent of metallicity and temperature. Since then, 7Li abundance in the Universe has become a subject of intrigue, because there is less of it in Population II dwarf stars (by a factor of 3) than standard big bang nucleosynthesis predicts. Here we show how quark-novae (QNe) occurring in the wake of Pop. III stars, can elegantly produce an A(Li) ~ 2.2 Lithium plateau in Pop. II (low-mass) stars formed in the pristine cloud swept up by the mixed SN+QN ejecta. We also find an increase in the scatter as well as an eventual drop in A(Li) below the Spite plateau values for very low metallicity ([Fe/H] < -3) in excellent agreement with observations. We propose a solution to the discrepancy between the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis 7Li abundance and the Spite plateau and list some implications and predictions of our model.
  • The exact mechanism behind Type Ia supernovae (SNe-Ia) and the nature of the progenitors is poorly understood, although several theories vie for supremacy. Their secured importance to the study of cosmology necessitates a resolution to this problem. Observations of nearby SNe-Ia are therefore critical to determine which theory, if any, is the correct one. SN 2014J discovered at a relatively close 3.5 Mpc in the galaxy M82 provides such an opportunity. In this paper we give specific predictions for SN 2014J in the context of the Quark Nova Ia (QN-Ia) model. Predictions include X-ray luminosities just prior and hundreds of days after the explosion, light curve "glitches", neutrino emission, heavy element creation, and gravitational signatures.
  • The accelerated expansion of the Universe was proposed through the use of Type-Ia SNe as standard candles. The standardization depends on an empirical correlation between the stretch/color and peak luminosity of the light curves. The use of Type Ia SN as standard candles rests on the assumption that their properties (and this correlation) do not vary with red-shift. We consider the possibility that the majority of Type-Ia SNe are in fact caused by a Quark-Nova detonation in a tight neutron-star-CO-white-dwarf binary system; a Quark-Nova Ia. The spin-down energy injected by the Quark Nova remnant (the quark star) contributes to the post-peak light curve and neatly explains the observed correlation between peak luminosity and light curve shape. We demonstrate that the parameters describing Quark-Novae Ia are NOT constant in red-shift. Simulated Quark-Nova Ia light curves provide a test of the stretch/color correlation by comparing the true distance modulus with that determined using SN light curve fitters. We determine a correction between the true and fitted distance moduli which when applied to Type-Ia SNe in the Hubble diagram recovers the Omega_M = 1 cosmology. We conclude that Type-Ia SNe observations do not necessitate the need for an accelerating expansion of the Universe (if the observed SNe-Ia are dominated by QNe-Ia) and by association the need for Dark Energy.
  • In recent years a number of double-humped supernovae have been discovered. This is a feature predicted by the dual-shock Quark-Nova model where a SN explosion is followed (a few days to a few weeks later) by a Quark-Nova explosion. SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc are the best observed examples of double-humped SNe. Here, we show that the dual-shock Quark-Nova model naturally explains their lightcurves including the late time emission, which we attribute to the interaction between the mixed SN and QN ejecta and the surrounding CSM. Our model applies to any star (O-stars, LBVs, WRs etc.) provided that the SN explosion mass is ~ 20M_sun which point to the conditions for forming a Quark-Nova.
  • We show that appealing to a Quark-Nova (QN) in a tight binary system containing a massive neutron star and a CO white dwarf (WD), a Type Ia explosion could occur. The QN ejecta collides with the WD driving a shock that triggers Carbon burning under degenerate conditions (the QN-Ia). The conditions in the compressed low-mass WD (M_WD < 0.9M_sun) in our model mimics those of a Chandrasekhar mass WD. The spin-down luminosity from the QN compact remnant (the quark star) provides additional power that makes the QN-Ia light-curve brighter and broader than a standard SN-Ia with similar 56Ni yield. In QNe-Ia, photometry and spectroscopy are not necessarily linked since the kinetic energy of the ejecta has a contribution from spin-down power and nuclear decay. Although QNe-Ia may not obey the Phillips relationship, their brightness and their relatively "normal looking" light-curves means they could be included in the cosmological sample. Light-curve fitters would be confused by the discrepancy between spectroscopy at peak and photometry and would correct for it by effectively brightening or dimming the QNe-Ia apparent magnitudes. Thus over- or under-estimating the true magnitude of these spin-down powered SNe-Ia. Contamination of QNe-Ia in samples of SNe-Ia used for cosmological analyses could systematically bias measurements of cosmological parameters if QNe-Ia are numerous enough at high-redshift. The strong mixing induced by spin-down wind combined with the low 56Ni yields in QNe-Ia means that these would lack a secondary maximum in the i-band despite their luminous nature. We discuss possible QNe-Ia progenitors.
  • The genesis and chemical patterns of the metal poor stars in the galactic halo remains an open question. Current models do not seem to give a satisfactory explanation for the observed abundances of Lithium in the galactic metal-poor stars and the existence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) and Nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor (NEMP) stars. In order to deal with some of these theoretical issues, we suggest an alternative explanation, where some of the Pop. III SNe are followed by the detonation of their neutron stars (Quark-Novae; QNe). In QNe occurring a few days to a few weeks following the preceding SN explosion, the neutron-rich relativistic QN ejecta leads to spallation of 56Ni processed in the ejecta of the preceding SN explosion and thus to "iron/metal impoverishment" of the primordial gas swept by the combined SN+QN ejecta. We show that the generation of stars formed from fragmentation of pristine clouds swept-up by the combined SN+QN ejecta acquire a metallicity with -7.5 < Fe/H] < -1.5 for dual explosions with 2 < t_delay (days) < 30. Spallation leads to the depletion of 56Ni and formation of sub-Ni elements such as Ti, V, Cr, and Mn providing a reasonable account of the trends observed in galactic halo metal-poor stars. CEMP stars form in dual explosions with short delays (t_delay < 5 days). These lead to important destruction of 56Ni (and thus to a drastic reduction of the amount of Fe in the swept up cloud) while preserving the carbon processed in the outer layers of the SN ejecta. Lithium is produced from the interaction of the neutron-rich QN ejecta with the outer (oxygen-rich) layers of the SN ejecta. A Lithium plateau with 2 < A(Li) < 2.4 can be produced in our model as well as a corresponding 6Li plateau with 6Li/7Li < 0.3.
  • Ultra Violet Imaging Telescope on ASTROSAT Satellite mission is a suite of Far Ultra Violet (FUV; 130 to 180 nm), Near Ultra Violet (NUV; 200 to 300 nm) and Visible band (VIS; 320 to 550nm) imagers. ASTROSAT is a first multi wavelength mission of INDIA. UVIT will image the selected regions of the sky simultaneously in three channels & observe young stars, galaxies, bright UV Sources. FOV in each of the 3 channels is about 28 arc-minute. Targeted angular resolution in the resulting UV images is better than 1.8 arc-second (better than 2.0 arc-second for the visible channel). Two identical co-aligned telescopes (T1, T2) of Ritchey-Chretien configuration (Primary mirror of 375 mm diameter) collect the celestial radiation and feed to the detector system via a selectable filter on a filter wheel mechanism; gratings are available in the filter wheels of FUV and NUV channels for slit-less low resolution spectroscopy. The detector system for each of the 3 channels is generically identical. One telescope images in the FUV channel, and other images in NUV and VIS channels. One time open-able mechanical cover on each telescope also works as Sun-shield after deployment.We will present the optical tests and calibrations done on the two telescopes. Results on vibrations test and thermo-vacuum tests on the engineering model will also be presented.
  • SN2006oz is a super-luminous supernova with a mysterious bright precursor that has resisted explanation in standard models. However, such a precursor has been predicted in the dual-shock quark nova (dsQN) model of super-luminous supernovae -- the precursor is the SN event while the main light curve of the SLSN is powered by the Quark-Nova (QN; explosive transition of the neutron star to a quark star). As the SN is fading, the QN re-energizes the SN ejecta, producing a "double-humped" light curve. In this paper, we show the dsQN model successfully reproduces the observed light curve of SN2006oz.
  • We propose a simple model explaining two outstanding astrophysical problems related to compact objects: (1) that of stars such as G87-7 (alias EG 50) that constitute a class of relatively low-mass white dwarfs which nevertheless fall away from the C/O composition and (2) that of GRB 110328A/Swift J164449.3+57345 which showed spectacularly long-lived strong X-ray flaring, posing a challenge to standard GRB models. We argue that both these observations may have an explanation within the unified framework of a Quark-Nova occurring in a low-mass X-ray binary (neutron star- white dwarf). For LMXBs where the binary separation is sufficiently tight, ejecta from the exploding Neutron Star triggers nuclear burning in the white dwarf on impact, possibly leading to Fe-rich composition compact white dwarfs with mass 0.43M_sun < M_WD < 0.72M_sun, reminiscent of G87-7. Our results rely on the assumption, which ultimately needs to be tested by hydrodynamic and nucleosynthesis simulations, that under certain circumstances the WD can avoid the thermonuclear runaway. For heavier white dwarfs (i.e. M_WD > 0.72M_sun) experiencing the QN shock, degeneracy will not be lifted when Carbon burning begins, and a sub-Chandrasekhar Type Ia Supernovae may result in our model. Under slightly different conditions, and for pure He white dwarfs (i.e. M_WD < 0.43M_sun), the white dwarf is ablated and its ashes raining down on the Quark star leads to accretion-driven X-ray luminosity with energetics and duration reminiscent of GRB 110328A. We predict additional flaring activity towards the end of the accretion phase if the Quark star turns into a Black Hole.
  • Atoms made of a particle and an antiparticle are unstable, usually surviving less than a microsecond. Antihydrogen, made entirely of antiparticles, is believed to be stable, and it is this longevity that holds the promise of precision studies of matter-antimatter symmetry. We have recently demonstrated trapping of antihydrogen atoms by releasing them after a confinement time of 172 ms. A critical question for future studies is: how long can anti-atoms be trapped? Here we report the observation of anti-atom confinement for 1000 s, extending our earlier results by nearly four orders of magnitude. Our calculations indicate that most of the trapped anti-atoms reach the ground state. Further, we report the first measurement of the energy distribution of trapped antihydrogen which, coupled with detailed comparisons with simulations, provides a key tool for the systematic investigation of trapping dynamics. These advances open up a range of experimental possibilities, including precision studies of CPT symmetry and cooling to temperatures where gravitational effects could become apparent.
  • We present r-Java, an r-process code for open use, that performs r-process nucleosynthesis calculations. Equipped with a simple graphical user interface, r-Java is capable of carrying out nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) as well as static and dynamic r-process calculations for a wide range of input parameters. In this introductory paper, we present the motivation and details behind r-Java, and results from our static and dynamic simulations. Static simulations are explored for a range of neutron irradiation and temperatures. Dynamic simulations are studied with a parameterized expansion formula. Our code generates the resulting abundance pattern based on a general entropy expression that can be applied to degenerate as well as non-degenerate matter, allowing us to track the rapid density and temperature evolution of the ejecta during the initial stages of ejecta expansion. At present, our calculations are limited to the waiting-point approximation. We encourage the nuclear astrophysics community to provide feedback on the code and related documentation, which is available for download from the website of the Quark-Nova Project: http://quarknova.ucalgary.ca/
  • Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars are believed to be magnetars, i.e. neutron stars powered by extreme magnetic fields, B~10^(14)-10^(15) Gauss. The recent discovery of a soft gamma repeater with low magnetic field (< 7.5x10^(12) Gauss), SGR 0418+5729, which shows bursts similar to those of SGRs, implies that a high surface dipolar magnetic field might not be necessary for magnetar-like activity. We show that the quiescent and bursting properties of SGR 0418+5729 find natural explanations in the context of low-magnetic field Quark-Nova (detonative transition from a neutron star to a quark star) remnants, i.e. an old quark star surrounded by degenerate (iron-rich) Keplerian ring/debris ejected during the Quark-Nova explosion. We find that a 16 Myr old quark star surrounded by a ~ 10^(-10)xM_sun ring, extending in radius from ~ 30 km to 60 km, reproduces many observed properties of SGR 0418+5729. The SGR-like burst is caused by magnetic penetration of the inner part of the ring and subsequent accretion. Radiation feedback results in months-long accretion from the ring's non-degenerate atmosphere which matches well the observed decay phase. We make specific predictions (such as an accretion glitch of Delta P/P ~ - 2x10^(-11) during burst and a sub-keV proton cyclotron line from the ring) that can be tested by sensitive observations.
  • We show that several features reminiscent of short-hard Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) arise naturally when Quark-Novae occur in low-mass X-ray binaries born with massive neutron stars (> 1.6M_sun) and harboring a circumbinary disk. Near the end of the first accretion phase, conditions are just right for the explosive conversion of the neutron star to a quark star (Quark-Nova). In our model, the subsequent interaction of material from the neutron star's ejected crust with the circumbinary disk explains the duration, variability and near-universal nature of the prompt emission in short-hard GRBs. We also describe a statistical approach to ejecta break-up and collision to obtain the photon spectrum in our model, which turns out remarkably similar to the empirical Band function (Band 1993). We apply the model to the fluence and spectrum of GRB 000727, GRB 000218, and GRB980706A obtaining excellent fits. Extended emission (spectrum and duration) is explained by shock-heating and ablation of the white dwarf by the highly energetic ejecta. Depending on the orbital separation when the Quark-Nova occurs, we isolate interesting regimes within our model when both prompt and extended emission can occur. We find that the spectrum can carry signatures typical of Type Ib/c SNe although these should appear less luminous than normal type Ib/c SNe. Late X-ray activity is due to accretion onto the quark star as well as its spin-down luminosity. Afterglow activity arise from the expanding shell of material from the shock-heated expanding circumbinary disk. We find a correlation between the duration and spectrum of short-hard GRBs as well as modest hard-to-soft time evolution of the peak energy.