• The Bayesian probit regression model (Albert and Chib (1993)) is popular and widely used for binary regression. While the improper flat prior for the regression coefficients is an appropriate choice in the absence of any prior information, a proper normal prior is desirable when prior information is available or in modern high dimensional settings where the number of coefficients ($p$) is greater than the sample size ($n$). For both choices of priors, the resulting posterior density is intractable and a Data Dugmentation (DA) Markov chain is used to generate approximate samples from the posterior distribution. Establishing geometric ergodicity for this DA Markov chain is important as it provides theoretical guarantees for constructing standard errors for Markov chain based estimates of posterior quantities. In this paper, we first show that in case of proper normal priors, the DA Markov chain is geometrically ergodic *for all* choices of the design matrix $X$, $n$ and $p$ (unlike the improper prior case, where $n \geq p$ and another condition on $X$ are required for posterior propriety itself). We also derive sufficient conditions under which the DA Markov chain is trace-class, i.e., the eigenvalues of the corresponding operator are summable. In particular, this allows us to conclude that the Haar PX-DA sandwich algorithm (obtained by inserting an inexpensive extra step in between the two steps of the DA algorithm) is strictly better than the DA algorithm in an appropriate sense.
  • Even today in our Galaxy, stars form from gas cores in a variety of environments, which may affect the properties of resulting star and planetary systems. Here we study the role of pressure, parameterized via ambient clump mass surface density, on protostellar evolution and appearance, focussing on low-mass, Sun-like stars and considering a range of conditions from relatively low pressure filaments in Taurus, to intermediate pressures of cluster-forming clumps like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), to very high pressures that may be found in the densest Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) or in the Galactic Center (GC). We present unified analytic and numerical models for collapse of prestellar cores, accretion disks, protostellar evolution and bipolar outflows, coupled to radiative transfer (RT) calculations and a simple astrochemical model to predict CO gas phase abundances. Prestellar cores in high pressure environments are smaller and denser and thus collapse with higher accretion rates and efficiencies, resulting in higher luminosity protostars with more powerful outflows. The protostellar envelope is heated to warmer temperatures, affecting infrared morphologies (and thus classification) and astrochemical processes like CO depletion to dust grain ice mantles (and thus CO morphologies). These results have general implications for star and planet formation, especially via their effect on astrochemical and dust grain evolution during infall to and through protostellar accretion disks.
  • The spatial morphology and dynamical status of a young, still-forming stellar cluster provide valuable clues on the conditions during the star formation event and the processes that regulated it. We analyze the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), utilizing the latest censuses of its stellar content and membership estimates over a large wavelength range. We determine the center of mass of the ONC, and study the radial dependence of angular substructure. The core appears rounder and smoother than the outskirts, consistent with a higher degree of dynamical processing. At larger distances the departure from circular symmetry is mostly driven by the elongation of the system, with very little additional substructure, indicating a somewhat evolved spatial morphology or an expanding halo. We determine the mass density profile of the cluster, which is well fitted by a power law that is slightly steeper than a singular isothermal sphere. Together with the ISM density, estimated from average stellar extinction, the mass content of the ONC is insufficient by a factor $\sim 1.8$ to reproduce the observed velocity dispersion from virialized motions, in agreement with previous assessments that the ONC is moderately supervirial. This may indicate recent gas dispersal. Based on the latest estimates for the age spread in the system and our density profiles, we find that, at the half-mass radius, 90% of the stellar population formed within $\sim 5$-$8$ free-fall times ($t_{\rm ff}$). This implies a star formation efficiency per $t_{\rm ff}$ of $\epsilon_{\rm ff}\sim 0.04$-$0.07$, i.e., relatively slow and inefficient star formation rates during star cluster formation.
  • The infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope has provided an invaluable tool for identifying physical processes in star formation. In this study we calculate the IRAC color space of UV fluorescent molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in photodissociation regions (PDRs) using the Cloudy code with PAH opacities from Draine & Li 2007. We create a set of color diagnostics that can be applied to study the structure of PDRs and to distinguish between FUV excited and shock excited H$_2$ emission. To test this method we apply these diagnostics to Spitzer IRAC data of NGC 2316. Our analysis of the structure of the PDR is consistent with previous studies of the region. In addition to UV excited emission, we identify shocked gas that may be part of an outflow originating from the cluster.
  • The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, $\Sigma$, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN) but boosted in normalization by factors $\gtrsim 10$ has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (~cm--m size) "pebbles", drifting inwards via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magneto-rotational instability (MRI)-inactive ("dead zone") region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an $\sim 1\ M_\oplus$ planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly-packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.
  • (Abridged) The Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) is the first large-scale (280 degree<l<300 degree, -4 degree<b<2 degree), unbiased, sub-parsec resolution survey of Galactic molecular clumps and their embedded stars. Barnes et al. (2011) presented the source catalog of ~300 clumps based on HCO+(1-0) emission, used to estimate masses M. Here we use archival mid-infrared to mm continuum data to construct spectral energy distributions. Fitting two-temperature grey-body models, we derive bolometric luminosities, L. We find the clumps have 10Lsun<L<1E6.5Lsun and 0.1<L/M<1E3, consistent with theoretical expectations of a clump population that spans a range of instantaneous star formation efficiencies from 0 to ~50%. We thus expect L/M to be a useful, strongly-varying indicator of clump evolution during the star cluster formation process. We find correlations of the ratio of warm to cold component fluxes and of cold component temperature with L/M. We also find a near linear relation between L/M and Spitzer-IRAC specific intensity (surface brightness), which may thus also be useful as a star formation efficiency indicator. The lower bound of the clump $L/M$ distribution suggests the star formation efficiency per free-fall time is epsilon<0.2. We do not find strong correlations of L/M with mass surface density, velocity dispersion or virial parameter. We find a linear relation between L and L_{HCO+(1-0}}, although with large scatter for any given individual clump. Fitting together with extragalactic systems, the linear relation still holds, extending over 10 orders of magnitude in luminosity. The complete nature of the CHaMP survey over a several kiloparsec-scale region allows us to derive a measurement at an intermediate scale bridging those of individual clumps and whole galaxies.
  • The best gravitational lenses for detecting distant galaxies are those with the largest mass concentrations and the most advantageous configurations of that mass along the line of sight. Our new method for finding such gravitational telescopes uses optical data to identify projected concentrations of luminous red galaxies (LRGs). LRGs are biased tracers of the underlying mass distribution, so lines of sight with the highest total luminosity in LRGs are likely to contain the largest total mass. We apply this selection technique to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and identify the 200 fields with the highest total LRG luminosities projected within a 3.5' radius over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 0.7. The redshift and angular distributions of LRGs in these fields trace the concentrations of non-LRG galaxies. These fields are diverse; 22.5% contain one known galaxy cluster and 56.0% contain multiple known clusters previously identified in the literature. Thus, our results confirm that these LRGs trace massive structures and that our selection technique identifies fields with large total masses. These fields contain 2-3 times higher total LRG luminosities than most known strong-lensing clusters and will be among the best gravitational lensing fields for the purpose of detecting the highest redshift galaxies.
  • Measuring the mass distribution of infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) over the wide dynamic range of their column densities is a fundamental obstacle in determining the initial conditions of high-mass star formation and star cluster formation. We present a new technique to derive high-dynamic-range, arcsecond-scale resolution column density data for IRDCs and demonstrate the potential of such data in measuring the density variance - sonic Mach number relation in molecular clouds. We combine near-infrared data from the UKIDSS/Galactic Plane Survey with mid-infrared data from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE survey to derive dust extinction maps for a sample of ten IRDCs. We then examine the linewidths of the IRDCs using 13CO line emission data from the FCRAO/Galactic Ring Survey and derive a column density - sonic Mach number relation for them. For comparison, we also examine the relation in a sample of nearby molecular clouds. The presented column density mapping technique provides a very capable, temperature independent tool for mapping IRDCs over the column density range equivalent to A_V=1-100 mag at a resolution of 2". Using the data provided by the technique, we present the first direct measurement of the relationship between the column density dispersion, \sigma_{N/<N>}, and sonic Mach number, M_s, in molecular clouds. We detect correlation between the variables with about 3-sigma confidence. We derive the relation \sigma_{N/<N>} = (0.047 \pm 0.016) Ms, which is suggestive of the correlation coefficient between the volume density and sonic Mach number, \sigma_{\rho/<\rho>} = (0.20^{+0.37}_{-0.22}) Ms, in which the quoted uncertainties indicate the 3-sigma range. When coupled with the results of recent numerical works, the existence of the correlation supports the picture of weak correlation between the magnetic field strength and density in molecular clouds (i.e., B ~ \rho^{0.5}).
  • The AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) is a redshift survey covering, in its standard fields, 7.7 square degrees of the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS). The final sample consists of 23745 redshifts. There are well-defined galaxy samples in ten bands (the Bw, R, I, J, K, IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 micron and MIPS 24 micron bands) to a limiting magnitude of I<20 mag for spectroscopy. For these galaxies, we obtained 18163 redshifts from a sample of 35200 galaxies, where random sparse sampling was used to define statistically complete sub-samples in all ten photometric bands. The median galaxy redshift is 0.31, and 90% of the redshifts are in the range 0.085<z<0.66. AGN were selected as radio, X-ray, IRAC mid-IR and MIPS 24 micron sources to fainter limiting magnitudes (I<22.5 mag for point sources). Redshifts were obtained for 4764 quasars and galaxies with AGN signatures, with 2926, 1718, 605, 119 and 13 above redshifts of 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. We detail all the AGES selection procedures and present the complete spectroscopic redshift catalogs, spectra, and spectral energy distribution decompositions. The photometric redshift estimates are for all sources in the AGES samples.
  • PSRB1055-52 is a middle-aged (~535 kyr) radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray pulsar showing X-ray thermal emission from the neutron star (NS) surface. A candidate optical counterpart to PSRB1055-52 was proposed by Mignani and coworkers based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations performed in 1996, in one spectral band only. We report on HST observations of this field carried out in 2008, in four spectral bands. The astrometric and photometric analyses of these data confirm the identification of the proposed candidate as the pulsar's optical counterpart. Similarly to other middle-aged pulsars, its optical-UV spectrum can be described by the sum of a power-law (PLO) component, presumably emitted from the pulsar magnetosphere, and a Rayleigh-Jeans (RJ) component emitted from the NS surface. The spectral index of the PLO component, alpha_O=1.05+/-0.34, is larger than for other pulsars with optical counterparts. The RJ component, with the brightness temperature TO=(0.66+/-0.10) d_350**2 R_O,13**-2 MK (where d_350 and R_O,13 are the distance to the pulsar in units of 350 pc and the radius of the emitting area in units of 13 km), shows a factor of 4 excess with respect to the extrapolation of the X-ray thermal component into the UV-optical. This hints that the RJ component is emitted from a larger, colder area, and suggests that the distance to the pulsar is smaller than previously thought. From the absolute astrometry of the HST images we measured the pulsar coordinates with a position accuracy of 0.15". From the comparison with previous observations we measured the pulsar proper motion, mu = 42+/-5 mas/yr, which corresponds to a transverse velocity V_t = (70+/-8) d_350 km/s.
  • We investigate the formation and evolution of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in a Milky-Way-like disk galaxy with a flat rotation curve. We perform a series of 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) numerical simulations that follow both the global evolution on scales of ~20kpc and resolve down to scales ~<10pc with a multiphase atomic interstellar medium (ISM). In this first study, we omit star formation and feedback, and focus on the processes of gravitational instability and cloud collisions and interactions. We define clouds as regions with n_H>=100cm^-3 and track the evolution of individual clouds as they orbit through the galaxy from their birth to their eventual destruction via merger or via destructive collision with another cloud. After ~140Myr a large fraction of the gas in the disk has fragmented into clouds with masses ~10^6 Msun and a mass spectrum similar to that of Galactic GMCs. The disk settles into a quasi steady state in which gravitational scattering of clouds keeps the disk near the threshold of global gravitational instability. The cloud collision time is found to be a small fraction, ~1/5, of the orbital time, and this is an efficient mechanism to inject turbulence into the clouds. This helps to keep clouds only moderately gravitationally bound, with virial parameters of order unity. Many other observed GMC properties, such as mass surface density, angular momentum, velocity dispersion, and vertical distribution, can be accounted for in this simple model with no stellar feedback.
  • (Abridged) We use 8 micron Spitzer GLIMPSE images to make extinction maps of 10 IRDCs, selected to be relatively nearby and massive. The extinction mapping technique requires modeling the IR background intensity behind the cloud, which is achieved by correcting for foreground emission and then interpolating from the surrounding regions. The correction for foreground emission can be quite large, thus restricting the utility of this technique to relatively nearby clouds. We investigate three methods for the interpolation, finding systematic differences at about the 10% level, which, for fiducial dust models, corresponds to a mass surface density Sigma = 0.013 g cm^-2, above which we conclude this extinction mapping technique attains validity. We examine the probability distribution function of Sigma in IRDCs. From a qualitative comparison with numerical simulations of astrophysical turbulence, many clouds appear to have relatively narrow distributions suggesting relatively low (<5) Mach numbers and/or dynamically strong magnetic fields. Given cloud kinematic distances, we derive cloud masses. Rathborne, Jackson & Simon identified cores within the clouds and measured their masses via mm dust emission. For 43 cores, we compare these mass estimates with those derived from our extinction mapping, finding good agreement: typically factors of <~2 difference for individual cores and an average systematic offset of <~10% for the adopted fiducial assumptions of each method. We find tentative evidence for a systematic variation of these mass ratios as a function of core density, which is consistent with models of ice mantle formation on dust grains and subsequent grain growth by coagulation, and/or with a temperature decrease in the densest cores.
  • We have used the two-step growth technique, quench condensing followed by an anneal, to grow ultra thin films of silver on glass substrates. As has been seen with semiconductor substrates this process produces a metastable homogeneous covering of silver. By measuring the in situ resistance of the film during growth we are able to see that the low temperature growth onto substrates held at 100 Kelvin produces a precursor phase that is insulating until the film has been annealed. The transformation of the precursor phase into the final, metallic silver film occurs at a characteristic temperature near 150K where the sample reconstructs. This reconstruction is accompanied by a decrease in resistance of up to 10 orders of magnitude.
  • Observations in the past decade have revealed extrasolar planets with a wide range of orbital semimajor axes and eccentricities. Based on the present understanding of planet formation via core accretion and oligarchic growth, we expect that giant planets often form in closely packed configurations. While the protoplanets are embedded in a protoplanetary gas disk, dissipation can prevent eccentricity growth and suppress instabilities from becoming manifest. However, once the disk dissipates, eccentricities can grow rapidly, leading to close encounters between planets. Strong planet--planet gravitational scattering could produce both high eccentricities and, after tidal circularization, very short-period planets, as observed in the exoplanet population. We present new results for this scenario based on extensive dynamical integrations of systems containing three giant planets, both with and without residual gas disks. We assign the initial planetary masses and orbits in a realistic manner following the core accretion model of planet formation. We show that, with realistic initial conditions, planet--planet scattering can reproduce quite well the observed eccentricity distribution. Our results also make testable predictions for the orbital inclinations of short-period giant planets formed via strong planet scattering followed by tidal circularization.
  • The young stellar population data of the Perseus, Ophiuchus and Serpens molecular clouds are obtained from the Spitzer c2d legacy survey in order to investigate the spatial structure of embedded clusters using the nearest neighbour and minimum spanning tree method. We identify the embedded clusters in these clouds as density enhancements and analyse the clustering parameter Q with respect to source luminosity and evolutionary stage. This analysis shows that the older Class 2/3 objects are more centrally condensed than the younger Class 0/1 protostars, indicating that clusters evolve from an initial hierarchical configuration to a centrally condensed one. Only IC348 and the Serpens core, the older clusters in the sample, shows signs of mass segregation (indicated by the dependence of Q on the source magnitude), pointing to a significant effect of dynamical interactions after a few Myr. The structure of a cluster may also be linked to the turbulent energy in the natal cloud as the most centrally condensed cluster is found in the cloud with the lowest Mach number and vice versa. In general these results agree well with theoretical scenarios of star cluster formation by gravoturbulent fragmentation.
  • We report the complete set of elastic constants and the bulk modulus for single crystal Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) at room temperature obtained from Brillouin spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The bulk modulus from Brillouin is found to be 103 GPa, in a good agreement with earlier x-ray studies. We also derived the refractive index along all principal axes and found PMN to be optically isotropic, with a refractive index of 2.52 +/- 0.02. PMN shows mechanical anisotropy with A=1.7. The MD simulations of PMN using the random site model overestimate the elastic constants by 20-50 GPa and the bulk modulus is 148 GPa, but the mechanical anisotropy matches the Brillouin results of A = 1.7. We also determined the elastic constants for various models of PMN and we find variation in the elastic constants based on chemical ordering.
  • We present x-ray reflectivity measurements from the free surface of a liquid gallium-bismuth alloy (Ga-Bi) in the temperature range close to the bulk monotectic temperature $T_{mono} = 222$C. Our measurements indicate a continuous formation of a thick wetting film at the free surface of the binary system driven by the first order transition in the bulk at the monotectic point. We show that the behavior observed is that of a complete wetting at a tetra point of solid-liquid-liquid-vapor coexistance.
  • We present high angular resolution (~0.5") 10 and 18 micron images of the region around G29.96-0.02 taken from the Gemini North 8-m telescope using the mid-infrared imager and spectrometer OSCIR. These observations were centered on the location of a group of water masers, which delineate the site of a hot molecular core believed to contain an extremely young, massive star. We report here the direct detection of a hot molecular core at mid-infrared wavelengths at this location. The size and extent of the core at 18 microns appears to be very similar to the morphology as seen in integrated NH3 maps. However, our observations indicate that the mid-infrared emission may not be exactly coincident with the NH3 emission.
  • For 15 bright (V<17.5), high redshift (z>3) quasars, we have obtained IR spectra and photometry, and optical spectrophotometry and photometry, which we use to construct their rest-frame 1285-5100 AA spectral energy distributions (SEDs). High resolution spectroscopy for 7 and L' detections of 4 extend their SEDs shortwards of Ly_alpha or redwards of 7500 AA. The average luminosities within a set of narrow, line-free, windows are computed. Power law fits to those from 1285 to 5100 AA, but excluding the 2000-4000 AA region of the FeII+BaC `small bump', adequately characterize the continuum shapes of most of the objects and yield optical/UV spectral indices (aouv: fnu ~ nu^{aouv}). To look for signs of evolution, we compare the distribution of the aouv for the z>3 quasars with that for a set of 27 z~0.1 quasars which are matched to the high redshift(z) ones in evolved luminosity. The mean (median) aouv for the high and low z samples are -0.32(-0.29) and -0.38(-0.40), respectively. Neither the distributions nor means differ significantly. The distributions of aouv for both samples span a wide range however, with Delta~1, which could be understood as the result of both a diversity in the emitted continua themselves and in the amounts of intrinsic extinction undergone. A clear difference between the high and low z samples occurs in the region of `small bump'. The power law fit residuals for the low z sample show a systematic excess from 2200-3000 AA ; this feature is weak or absent in the high z sample. Further study is needed, but the `small bump' evolution could reflect differences in iron abundance or FeII energy source, or alternatively, an intrinsic turnover in the continuum itself which is present at low but not at high z. (Abridged)
  • A model-independent reconstruction of mechanical profiles (density, pressure) of the solar interior is outlined using the adiabatic sound speed and bouyancy frequency profiles. These can be inferred from helioseismology if both p- and g-mode frequencies are measured. A simulated reconstruction is presented using a solar model bouyancy frequency and available sound speed data.
  • We study the localized stationary solutions of the one-dimensional time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations in the presence of a current. These threshold perturbations separate undercritical perturbations which return to the normal phase from overcritical perturbations which lead to the superconducting phase. Careful numerical work in the small-current limit shows that the amplitude of these solutions is exponentially small in the current; we provide an approximate analysis which captures this behavior. As the current is increased toward the stall current J*, the width of these solutions diverges resulting in widely separated normal-superconducting interfaces. We map out numerically the dependence of J* on u (a parameter characterizing the material) and use asymptotic analysis to derive the behaviors for large u (J* ~ u^-1/4) and small u (J -> J_c, the critical deparing current), which agree with the numerical work in these regimes. For currents other than J* the interface moves, and in this case we study the interface velocity as a function of u and J. We find that the velocities are bounded both as J -> 0 and as J -> J_c, contrary to previous claims.