• We present results from the first two years of our fast-cadence 15 GHz gamma-ray blazar monitoring program, part of the F-GAMMA radio monitoring project. Our sample includes the 1158 blazars north of -20 degrees declination from the Candidate Gamma-Ray Blazar Survey (CGRaBS), which encompasses a significant fraction of the extragalactic sources detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We introduce a novel likelihood analysis for computing a time series variability amplitude statistic that separates intrinsic variability from measurement noise and produces a quantitative error estimate. We use this method to characterize our radio light curves. We also present results indicating a statistically significant correlation between simultaneous average 15 GHz radio flux density and gamma-ray photon flux.
  • Understanding the ability to measure and discriminate particle events at the lowest possible energy is an essential requirement in developing new experiments to search for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. In this paper we detail an assessment of the potential sensitivity below 10 keV in the 1 m^3 DRIFT-II directionally sensitive, low pressure, negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC), based on event-by-event track reconstruction and calorimetry in the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) readout. By application of a digital smoothing polynomial it is shown that the detector is sensitive to sulfur and carbon recoils down to 2.9 and 1.9 keV respectively, and 1.2 keV for electron induced events. The energy sensitivity is demonstrated through the 5.9 keV gamma spectrum of 55Fe, where the energy resolution is sufficient to identify the escape peak. The effect a lower energy sensitivity on the WIMP exclusion limit is demonstrated. In addition to recoil direction reconstruction for WIMP searches this sensitivity suggests new prospects for applications also in KK axion searches.
  • We demonstrate accurate single-qubit control in an ensemble of atomic qubits trapped in an optical lattice. The qubits are driven with microwave radiation, and their dynamics tracked by optical probe polarimetry. Real-time diagnostics is crucial to minimize systematic errors and optimize the performance of single-qubit gates, leading to fidelities of 0.99 for single-qubit pi rotations. We show that increased robustness to large, deliberately introduced errors can be achieved through the use of composite rotations. However, during normal operation the combination of very small intrinsic errors and additional decoherence during the longer pulse sequences precludes any significant performance gain in our current experiment.
  • Tin coupons were shock damaged/melted under identical conditions with a diverging high explosive shock wave. Proton Radiography images and velocimetry data from experiments with seven different tin coupons of varying thickness are analyzed. Comparing experiments with identical samples allowed us to distinguish between repeatable and random features. Shapes and velocities of the main fragments are deterministic functions of the coupon thickness; random differences exist only at a small scale. Velocities of the leading layer and of the main fragment differ by the same value independently of coupon thicknesses, which is likely related to the separation energy of metal layers.
  • The energies of a pair of strongly-interacting subsystems with arbitrary noninteger charges are examined from closed and open system perspectives. An ensemble representation of the charge dependence is derived, valid at all interaction strengths. Transforming from resonance-state ionicity to ensemble charge dependence imposes physical constraints on the occupation numbers in the strong-interaction limit. For open systems, the chemical potential is evaluated using microscopic and thermodynamic models, leading to a novel correlation between ground-state charge and an electronic temperature.
  • Linear discrimination, from the point of view of numerical linear algebra, can be treated as solving an ill-posed system of linear equations. In order to generate a solution that is robust in the presence of noise, these problems require regularization. Here, we examine the ill-posedness involved in the linear discrimination of cancer gene expression data with respect to outcome and tumor subclasses. We show that a filter factor representation, based upon Singular Value Decomposition, yields insight into the numerical ill-posedness of the hyperplane-based separation when applied to gene expression data. We also show that this representation yields useful diagnostic tools for guiding the selection of classifier parameters, thus leading to improved performance.
  • We study the closed Hamiltonian dynamics of a free particle moving on a ring, over one section of which it interacts linearly with a single harmonic oscillator. On the basis of numerical and analytical evidence, we conjecture that at small positive energies the phase space of our model is completely chaotic except for a single region of complete integrability with a smooth sharp boundary showing no KAM-type structures of any kind. This results in the cleanest mixed phase space structure possible, in which motions in the integrable region and in the chaotic region are clearly separated and independent of one another. For certain system parameters, this mixed phase space structure can be tuned to make either of the two components disappear, leaving a completely integrable or completely chaotic phase space. For other values of the system parameters, additional structures appear, such as KAM-like elliptic islands, and one parameter families of parabolic periodic orbits embedded in the chaotic sea. The latter are analogous to bouncing ball orbits seen in the stadium billiard. The analytical part of our study proceeds from a geometric description of the dynamics, and shows it to be equivalent to a linked twist map on the union of two intersecting disks.
  • To better understand diffuse ionized gas kinematics and halo rotation in spiral galaxies, we have developed a model in which clouds are ejected from the disk and follow ballistic trajectories through the halo. The behavior of clouds in this model has been investigated thoroughly through a parameter space search and a study of individual cloud orbits. Synthetic velocity profiles have been generated in z (height above the plane) from the models for the purpose of comparing with velocity centroid data from previously obtained long-slit spectra of the edge-on spirals NGC 891 (one slit) and NGC 5775 (two slits). In each case, a purely ballistic model is insufficient in explaining observed DIG kinematics. In the case of NGC 891, the observed vertical velocity gradient is not as steep as predicted by the model, possibly suggesting a source of coupling between disk and halo rotation or an outwardly directed pressure gradient. The ballistic model more successfully explains DIG kinematics observed in NGC 5775; however, it cannot explain the observed trend of high-z gas velocities nearly reaching the systemic velocity. Such behavior can be attributed to either an inwardly directed pressure gradient or a possible tidal interaction with its companion, NGC 5774. In addition, the ballistic model predicts that clouds move radially outward as they cycle through the halo. The mass and energy fluxes estimated from the model suggest this radially outward gas migration leads to a redistribution of material that may significantly affect the evolution of the ISM.
  • We consider notions of physical equivalence of sets of histories in the quantum mechanics of a closed system. We show first how the same set of histories can be relabeled in various ways, including the use of the Heisenberg equations of motion and of passive transformations of field variables. In the the usual approximate quantum mechanics of a measured subsystem, two observables re- presented by different Hermitian operators are physically distinguished by the different apparatus used to measure them. In the quantum mechanics of a closed system, however, any apparatus is part of the system and the notion of physically distinct situations has a different character. We show that a triple consisting of an initial condition, a Hamiltonian, and a set of histories is physically equivalent to another triple if the operators representing these initial conditions, Hamiltonians, and histories are related by any fixed unitary transformation. We apply this result to the question of whether the universe might exhibit physically inequivalent quasiclassical realms (which we earlier called quasiclassical domains), not just the one that includes familiar experience. We describe how the probabilities of alternative forms, behaviors, and evolutionary histories of information gathering and utilizing systems (IGUSes) using the usual quasiclassical realm could in principle be calculated in quantum cosmology, although it is, of course, impractical to perform the computations. We discuss how, in principle, the probabilities of occurence of IGUSes could be calculated in realms distinct from the usual quasiclassical one. We discuss how IGUSes adapted mainly to two different realms could draw inferences about each other using a hybrid realm consisting of alternatives drawn from each.
  • We introduce a condition for the strong decoherence of a set of alternative histories of a closed quantum-mechanical system such as the universe. The condition applies, for a pure initial state, to sets of homogeneous histories that are chains of projections, generally branch-dependent. Strong decoherence implies the consistency of probability sum rules but not every set of consistent or even medium decoherent histories is strongly decoherent. Two conditions characterize a strongly decoherent set of histories: (1) At any time the operators that effectively commute with generalized records of history up to that moment provide the pool from which -- with suitable adjustment for elapsed time -- the chains of projections extending history to the future may be drawn. (2) Under the adjustment process, generalized record operators acting on the initial state of the universe are approximately unchanged. This expresses the permanence of generalized records. The strong decoherence conditions (1) and (2) guarantee what we call ``permanence of the past'' -- in particular the continued decoherence of past alternatives as the chains of projections are extended into the future. Strong decoherence is an idealization capturing in a general way this and other aspects of realistic physical mechanisms that destroy interference, as we illustrate in a simple model. We discuss the connection between the reduced density matrices that have often been used to characterize mechanisms of decoherence and the more general notion of strong decoherence. The relation between strong decoherence and a measure of classicality is briefly described.
  • We analyze a randomly perturbed quantum version of the baker's transformation, a prototype of an area-conserving chaotic map. By numerically simulating the perturbed evolution, we estimate the information needed to follow a perturbed Hilbert-space vector in time. We find that the Landauer erasure cost associated with this information grows very rapidly and becomes much larger than the maximum statistical entropy given by the logarithm of the dimension of Hilbert space. The quantum baker's map thus displays a hypersensitivity to perturbations that is analogous to behavior found earlier in the classical case. This hypersensitivity characterizes ``quantum chaos'' in a way that is directly relevant to statistical physics.