• Most millisecond pulsars with low-mass companions are in systems with either helium-core white dwarfs or non-degenerate ("black widow" or "redback") stars. A candidate counterpart to PSR J1816+4510 was identified by Kaplan et al. (2012) whose properties were suggestive of both types of companions although identical to neither. We have assembled optical spectroscopy of the candidate companion and confirm that it is part of the binary system with a radial velocity amplitude of 343+/-7 km/s, implying a high pulsar mass, Mpsr*sin^3i=1.84+/-0.11 Msun, and a companion mass Mc*sin^3i=0.192+/-0.012 Msun, where i is the inclination of the orbit. The companion appears similar to proto-white dwarfs/sdB stars, with a gravity log(g)=4.9+/-0.3, and effective temperature 16000+/-500 K. The strongest lines in the spectrum are from hydrogen, but numerous lines from helium, calcium, silicon, and magnesium are present as well, with implied abundances of roughly ten times solar (relative to hydrogen). As such, while from the spectrum the companion to PSR J1816+4510 is superficially most similar to a low-mass white dwarf, it has much lower gravity, is substantially larger, and shows substantial metals. Furthermore, it is able to produce ionized gas eclipses, which had previously been seen only for low-mass, non-degenerate companions in redback or black widow systems. We discuss the companion in relation to other sources, but find we understand neither its nature nor its origins. Thus, the system is interesting for understanding unusual stellar products of binary evolution, as well as, independent of its nature, for determining neutron-star masses.
  • We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous M_r<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5<r<17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04<z<0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g. streams, shells and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g. major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame colour and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10^10.5 M_sun, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.
  • Direct detection of the Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization (EOR) is among the main scientific objectives of all current and future low-frequency radio facilities. In this paper we summarize and discuss recent results, based on state-of-the-art numerical simulations, regarding the fundamental EOR properties and its observability with current and future radio arrays, like the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR), the 21-CM Array (21CMA), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Results show that the optimal observational frequencies for statistical detection are 140-160 MHz. The signals are strongly non-Gaussian at late times. The correlation widths between 21-cm maps at neighbouring frequencies are short, of order 300-800 kHz, which should help with the cleaning of the strong foregrounds. Direct comparison of the resolutions and expected sensitivities of GMRT and MWA indicate that their optimal sensitivity ranges are similar, at scales k~0.2-0.4 h/Mpc, however, all else being equal the former should require shorter integration times due to its significantly larger collecting area.
  • We study the limits of accuracy for weak lensing maps of dark matter using diffuse 21-cm radiation from the pre-reionization epoch using simulations. We improve on previous "optimal" quadratic lensing estimators by using shear and convergence instead of deflection angles. We find that non-Gaussianity provides a limit to the accuracy of weak lensing reconstruction, even if instrumental noise is reduced to zero. The best reconstruction result is equivalent to Gaussian sources with effectively independent cell of side length 2.0/h Mpc. Using a source full map from z=10-20, this limiting sensitivity allows mapping of dark matter at a Signal-to-Noise ratio (S/N) greater than 1 out to l < 6000, which is better than any other proposed technique for large area weak lensing mapping.
  • Recent observations have revealed that damped Ly$\alpha$ clouds (DLAs) host star formation activity. In order to examine if such star formation activity can be triggered by ionization fronts, we perform high-resolution hydrodynamics and radiative transfer simulations of the effect of radiative feedback from propagating ionization fronts on high-density clumps. We examine two sources of ultraviolet (UV) radiation field to which high-redshift (z ~ 3) galaxies could be exposed: one corresponding to the UV radiation originating from stars within the DLA, itself, and the other corresponding to the UV background radiation. We find that, for larger clouds, the propagating I-fronts created by local stellar sources can trigger cooling instability and collapse of significant part, up to 85%, of the cloud, creating conditions for star formation in a timescale of a few Myr. The passage of the I-front also triggers collapse of smaller clumps (with radii below ~4 pc), but in these cases the resulting cold and dense gas does not reach conditions conducive to star formation. Assuming that 85% of the gas initially in the clump is converted into stars, we obtain a star formation rate of $\sim 0.25 M_\odot {yr}^{-1} {kpc}^{-2}$. This is somewhat higher than the value derived from recent observations. On the other hand, the background UV radiation which has harder spectrum fails to trigger cooling and collapse. Instead, the hard photons which have long mean-free-path heat the dense clumps, which as a result expand and essentially dissolve in the ambient medium. Therefore, the star formation activity in DLAs is strongly regulated by the radiative feedback, both from the external UV background and internal stellar sources and we predict quiescent evolution of DLAs (not starburst-like evolution).
  • We have developed a new numerical technique for simulating dusty-gas flows. Our unique code incorporates gas hydrodynamics, self-gravity and dust drag to follow the dynamical evolution of a dusty-gas medium. We have incorporated several descriptions for the drag between gas and dust phases and can model flows with submillimetre, centimetre and metre size "dust". We present calculations run on the APAC* supercomputer following the evolution of the dust distribution in the pre-solar nebula. *Australian Partnership for Advanced Computing
  • We present the composite luminosity function of a sample of 17 low-redshift galaxy clusters. Our luminosity functions have been measured for an inner region ($r \leq r_{200}$) and an outer region ($r_{200} \leq r \leq 2r_{200}$) centred on each Brightest Cluster Galaxy. The inner region luminosity function has a significantly flatter faint-end slope ($\alpha_{inner}= -1.81 \pm 0.02$) than the outer region ($\alpha_{outer}= -2.07 \pm 0.02$). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a large fraction of dwarf galaxies near cluster centres are being tidally disrupted.