• Context. The Mg I 4571 {\AA} line and the b triplet are denoted in the literature as diagnostics of solar and stellar activity since their formation is in the low chromosphere. Aims. To investigate the potential of these four spectral lines as diagnostics of chromospheric activity in solar-like stars, studying the dependence of the intensity of these lines from local atmospheric changes by varying atmospheric models and stellar parameters. Methods. Starting with Next-Gen photospheric models, we build a grid of atmospheric models including photosphere, chromosphere and transition region and solve the radiative transfer to obtain synthetic profiles to compare with observed spectra of main-sequence, solar like stars with effective temperatures in the range 4800-6400 K, solar gravity and solar metallicity. Results. We find that the Mg I 4571 {\AA} line is significantly sensitive to local changes in the atmospheric model around the minimum temperature. Instead, the lines of the b triplet do not show significant responses to changes on the local atmospheric structure.
  • Simultaneous, high-quality measurements of the neutral helium triplet features at 5876~\AA\ and 10830~\AA, respectively, in a sample of solar-type stars are presented. The observations were made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 088.D-0028(A) and MPG Utility Run for FEROS 088.A-9029(A). The equivalent widths of these features combined with chromospheric models are utilized to infer the fractional area coverage, or filling factor, of magnetic regions outside of spots. We find that the majority of the sample is characterized by filling factors less than unity. However, discrepancies occur among the coolest K-type and warmest and most rapidly rotating F-type dwarf stars. We discuss these apparently anomalous results and find that in the case of K-type stars they are an artifact of the application of chromospheric models best suited to the Sun than to stars with significantly lower $T_\mathrm{eff}$. The case of the F-type rapid rotators can be explained with the measurement uncertainties of the equivalent widths, but they may also be due to a non-magnetic heating component in their atmospheres. With the exceptions noted above, preliminary results suggest that the average heating rates in the active regions are the same from one star to the other, differing in the spatially integrated, observed level of activity due to the area coverage. Hence, differences in activity in this sample are mainly due to the filling factor of active regions.
  • We investigate the increase of the DEM (differential emission measure) towards the chromosphere due to small and cool magnetic loops (height $\lesssim8$~Mm, $T\lesssim10^5$~K). In a previous paper we analysed the conditions of existence and stability of these loops through hydrodynamic simulations, focusing on their dependence on the details of the optically thin radiative loss function used. In this paper, we extend those hydrodynamic simulations to verify if this class of loops exists and it is stable when using an optically thick radiative loss function. We study two cases: constant background heating and a heating depending on the density. The contribution to the transition region EUV output of these loops is also calculated and presented. We find that stable, quasi-static cool loops can be obtained by using an optically thick radiative loss function and a background heating depending on the density. The DEMs of these loops, however, fail to reproduce the observed DEM for temperatures between $4.6<\log T<4.8$. We also show the transient phase of a dynamic loop obtained by considering constant heating rate and find that its average DEM, interpreted as a set of evolving dynamic loops, reproduces quite well the observed DEM.
  • For the first time, we present and discuss EUV radiances of the solar transition region (TR) and corona obtained during a solar cycle. The measurements were obtained with the SOHO/coronal diagnostic spectrometer (CDS) during the period from 1996 to 2010. We find that limb-brightening significantly affects any characterisation of the solar radiances. We present the limb-brightening function for the main lines and find that it does not change measurably during the cycle. We confirm earlier findings that the radiance histogram of the cooler lines have a well defined, log-normal quiet-Sun component, although our results differ from previous ones. The width of the lowest-radiance log-normal distribution is constant along the cycle. Both the analysis of the centre-to-limb variation and of the radiance statistical distribution point to a constant QS emission along solar cycle 23. Lines formed above 1 MK are dramatically affected by the presence of active regions, and indeed, no "quiet Sun" region can be defined during periods of maximum activity. Much of the irradiance variability in lines formed below 1.5 MK is due to a change in the emitting area. For hotter lines, the emitting area saturates to almost 100% of full solar disk at the maximum of activity, while simultaneously the emission due to active regions increases by more than an order of magnitude. We show that structures around active regions, sometimes referred to as dark halos or dark canopies, are common and discuss their similarities and differences with coronal holes. In particular, we show how they are well visible in TR lines, contrary to coronal holes.
  • We present the lessons learned about the degradation observed in several space solar missions, based on contributions at the Workshop about On-Orbit Degradation of Solar and Space Weather Instruments that took place at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (Royal Observatory of Belgium) in Brussels on 3 May 2012. The aim of this workshop was to open discussions related to the degradation observed in Sun-observing instruments exposed to the effects of the space environment. This article summarizes the various lessons learned and offers recommendations to reduce or correct expected degradation with the goal of increasing the useful lifespan of future and ongoing space missions.
  • Images taken in the band centered at 30.4 nm are routinely used to map the radiance of the He II Ly alpha line on the solar disk. That line is one of the strongest, if not the strongest, line in the EUV observed in the solar spectrum, and one of the few lines in that wavelength range providing information on the upper chromosphere or lower transition region. However, when observing the off-limb corona the contribution from the nearby Si XI 30.3 nm line can become significant. In this work we aim at estimating the relative contribution of those two lines in the solar corona around the minimum of solar activity. We combine measurements from CDS taken in August 2008 with temperature and density profiles from semiempirical models of the corona to compute the radiances of the two lines, and of other representative coronal lines (e.g., Mg X 62.5 nm, Si XII 52.1 nm). Considering both diagnosed quantities from line ratios (temperatures and densities) and line radiances in absolute units, we obtain a good overall match between observations and models. We find that the Si XI line dominates the He II line from just above the limb up to ~2 R_Sun in streamers, while its contribution to narrowband imaging in the 30.4 nm band is expected to become smaller, even negligible in the corona beyond ~2 - 3 R_Sun, the precise value being strongly dependent on the coronal temperature profile.
  • In the last 30 years, the existence of small and cool magnetic loops (height < 8 Mm, T < 10^5 K) has been proposed and debated to explain the increase of the DEM (differential emission measure) towards the chromosphere. We present hydrodynamic simulations of low-lying cool loops to study their conditions of existence and stability, and their contribution to the transition region EUV output. We find that stable, quasi-static cool loops (with velocities < 1 km/s) can be obtained under different and more realistic assumptions on the radiative losses function with respect to previous works. A mixture of the DEMs of these cool loops plus intermediate loops with temperatures between 10^5 and 10^6 K can reproduce the observed emission of the lower transition region at the critical turn-up temperature point (T ~ 2x10^5 K) and below T = 10^5 K.
  • The magnetic field plays a pivotal role in many fields of Astrophysics. This is especially true for the physics of the solar atmosphere. Measuring the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere is crucial to understand the nature of the underlying physical processes that drive the violent dynamics of the solar corona -- that can also affect life on Earth. SolmeX, a fully equipped solar space observatory for remote-sensing observations, will provide the first comprehensive measurements of the strength and direction of the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere. The mission consists of two spacecraft, one carrying the instruments, and another one in formation flight at a distance of about 200m carrying the occulter to provide an artificial total solar eclipse. This will ensure high-quality coronagraphic observations above the solar limb. Solmex integrates two spectro-polarimetric coronagraphs for off-limb observations, one in the EUV and one in the IR, and three instruments for observations on the disk. The latter comprises one imaging polarimeter in the EUV for coronal studies, a spectro-polarimeter in the EUV to investigate the low corona, and an imaging spectro-polarimeter in the UV for chromospheric studies. SOHO and other existing missions have investigated the emission of the upper atmosphere in detail (not considering polarization), and as this will be the case also for missions planned for the near future. Therefore it is timely that SolmeX provides the final piece of the observational quest by measuring the magnetic field in the upper atmosphere through polarimetric observations.
  • The POLAR Investigation of the Sun (POLARIS) mission uses a combination of a gravity assist and solar sail propulsion to place a spacecraft in a 0.48 AU circular orbit around the Sun with an inclination of 75 degrees with respect to solar equator. This challenging orbit is made possible by the challenging development of solar sail propulsion. This first extended view of the high-latitude regions of the Sun will enable crucial observations not possible from the ecliptic viewpoint or from Solar Orbiter. While Solar Orbiter would give the first glimpse of the high latitude magnetic field and flows to probe the solar dynamo, it does not have sufficient viewing of the polar regions to achieve POLARIS' primary objective : determining the relation between the magnetism and dynamics of the Sun's polar regions and the solar cycle.
  • We are carrying out a survey of magnetic fields in Ap stars in open clusters in order to obtain the first sample of magnetic upper main sequence stars with precisely known ages. These data will constrain theories of field evolution in these stars. Using the new spectropolarimeter ESPaDOnS at CFHT, we have obtained 44 measurements of the mean longitudinal fields of 23 B6 - A2 stars that have been identified as possible Ap stars and that are possible members of open clusters, with a median uncertainty of about 45 G. Of these stars, 10 have definite field detections. Nine stars of our sample are found not to be magnetic Ap stars. The ESPaDOnS data contain a large amount of useful information not readily obtained from lower resolution spectropolarimetry. With the new observations we are able to expand the available data on fields of low-mass, relatively evolved Ap stars, and identify more robustly which observed stars are actually magnetic Ap stars and cluster members. Re-analysis of the enlarged data set of cluster Ap stars indicates that such stars with masses in the range of 2 -- 5 \mo show RMS fields larger than about 1 kG only when they are near the ZAMS. The time scale on which these large fields disappear varies strongly with mass, ranging from about 250 Myr for stars of 2 - 3 solar mass to 15 Myr for stars of 4 - 5 solar mass. Our data are consistent either with emergent flux conservation for most (but not all) Ap stars, or with modest decline in flux with age.
  • The evolution of magnetic fields in Ap stars during the main sequence phase is presently mostly unconstrained by observation because of the difficulty of assigning accurate ages to known field Ap stars. We are carrying out a large survey of magnetic fields in cluster Ap stars with the goal of obtaining a sample of these stars with well-determined ages. In this paper we analyse the information available from the survey as it currently stands. We select from the available observational sample the stars that are probably (1) cluster or association members and (2) magnetic Ap stars. For the stars in this subsample we determine the fundamental parameters T_eff, log(L/L_o), and M/M_o. With these data and the cluster ages we assign both absolute age and fractional age (the fraction of the main sequence lifetime completed). For this purpose we have derived new bolometric corrections for Ap stars. Magnetic fields are present at the surfaces of Ap stars from the ZAMS to the TAMS. Statistically for the stars with M > 3 M_o the fields decline with advancing age approximately as expected from flux conservation together with increased stellar radius, or perhaps even faster than this rate, on a time scale of about 3 10^7 yr. In contrast, lower mass stars show no compelling evidence for field decrease even on a timescale of several times 10^8 yr. Study of magnetic cluster stars is now a powerful tool for obtaining constraints on evolution of Ap stars through the main sequence. Enlarging the sample of known cluster magnetic stars, and obtaining more precise RMS fields, will help to clarify the results obtained so far. Further field observations are in progress.
  • About 5% of upper main sequence stars are permeated by a strong magnetic field, the origin of which is still matter of debate. With this work we provide observational material to study how magnetic fields change with the evolution of stars on the main sequence, and to constrain theory explaining the presence of magnetic fields in A and B-type stars. Using FORS1 in spectropolarimetric mode at the ESO VLT, we have carried out a survey of magnetic fields in early-type stars belonging to open clusters and associations of various ages. We have measured the magnetic field of 235 early-type stars with a typical uncertainty of about 100 G. In our sample, 97 stars are Ap or Bp stars. For these targets, the median error bar of our field measurements was about 80 G. A field has been detected in about 41 of these stars, 37 of which were not previously known as magnetic stars. For the 138 normal A and B-type stars, the median error bar was 136 G, and no field was detected in any of them.
  • An observing campaign (SOHO JOP 139), coordinated between ground based and SOHO instruments, has been planned to obtain simultaneous spectroheliograms of the same active region in several spectral lines. The chromospheric lines CaII K, Halpha and Na D as well as HeI 10830, 5876, 584 and HeII 304 AA lines have been observed.These simultaneous observations allow us to build semi-empirical models of the chromosphere and low transition region of an active region, taking into account the estimated total number of photoionizing photons impinging on the target active region and their spectral distribution. We obtained a model that matches very well all the observed line profiles, using a standard value for the He abundance ([He]=0.1) and a modified distribution of microturbulence. For this model we study the influence of the coronal radiation on the computed helium lines. We find that, even in an active region, the incident coronal radiation has a limited effect on the UV He lines, while it results of fundamental importance for the 5876 and 10830 lines. Finally we build two more models assuming values of He abundance [He]= 0.07 and 1.5, only in the region where temperatures are larger than 1.* 10^4 K. This region, between the chromosphere and transition region, has been indicated as a good candidate for processes that might be responsible for strong variations of [He]. The set of our observables can still be well reproduced in both cases changing the atmospheric structure mainly in the low transition region. This implies that,to choose between different values of [He], it is necessary to constrain the transition region with different observables, independent on the He lines.