• The study has been carried out on the prospects of probing the sterile neutrino mixing with the magnetized Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO), using atmospheric neutrinos as a source. The so-called 3~$+$~1 scenario is considered for active-sterile neutrino mixing and lead to projected exclusion curves in the sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle plane. The analysis is performed using the neutrino event generator NUANCE, modified for ICAL, and folded with the detector resolutions obtained by the INO collaboration from a full GEANT4 based detector simulation. A comparison has been made between the results obtained from the analysis considering only the energy and zenith angle of the muon and combined with the hadron energy due to the neutrino induced event. A small improvement has been observed with the addition of the hadron information to the muon. In the analysis we consider neutrinos coming from all zenith angles and the Earth matter effects are also included. The inclusion of events from all zenith angles improves the sensitivity to sterile neutrino mixing by about 35$\%$ over the result obtained using only down-going events. The improvement mainly stems from the impact of Earth matter effects on active-sterile mixing. The expected precision of ICAL on the active-sterile mixing is explored and allowed confidence level (C.L.) contours presented. At the assumed true value of $10^\circ$ for the sterile mixing angles and marginalization over $\Delta m^2_{41}$ and the sterile mixing angles, the upper bound at 90\% C.L. (from 2 parameter plots) is around $20^\circ$ for $\theta_{14}$ and $\theta_{34}$, and about $12^\circ$ for $\theta_{24}$.
  • An array of eight CsI(Tl) detectors has been set up to measure the light charged particles in nuclear reactions using heavy ions from the Pelletron Linac Facility, Mumbai. The energy response of CsI(Tl) detector to $\alpha$-particles from 5 to 40 MeV is measured using radioactive sources and the $^{12}$C($^{12}$C, $\alpha$) reaction populating discrete states in $^{20}$Ne. The energy non-linearity and the count rate effect on the pulse shape discrimination property have also been measured and observed the deterioration of pulse shape discrimination with higher count rate.
  • The response of the liquid scintillator (EJ-301 equivalent to NE-213) to the monoenergetic electrons produced in Compton scattered $\gamma$-ray tagging has been carried out for various radioactive $\gamma$-ray sources. The measured electron response is found to be linear up to $\sim$4~MeVee and the resolution of the liquid scintillator at 1~MeVee is observed to be $\sim$~11\%. The pulse shape discrimination and pulse height response of the liquid scintillator for neutrons has been measured using $^7$Li(p,n$_1$)$^7$Be*(0.429 MeV) reaction. Non linear response to mono-energetic neutrons for the liquid scintillator is observed at E$_n$=5.3, 9.0 and 12.7 MeV. The measured response of the liquid scintillator for electrons and neutrons have been compared with Geant4 simulation.
  • The 50~kton Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the underground India based Neutrino Observatory (INO) will make measurements on atmospheric neutrinos. Muons produced in charged current (CC) interactions of muon neutrinos with the iron are tracked spatially and temporally through the signals that they produce in the Resistive Plate Chambers~(RPCs) that are interleaved with iron layers. Since the RPCs will be operated in the avalanche mode the signal rise-time is $\sim~1~\rm{nsec}$ resulting in a fast time response. While the muon track is derived from the X and Y hit information of the RPCs and the layer number (Z), the upward or downward direction is obtained by using the time information from the detector. Such a capability can be examined by analysing the timing information from $1~\rm{m}~\times~1~\rm{m}$ glass RPCs, with $3~\rm{cm}$ wide X- and Y- pick-up strips, in a $12$ layer RPC stack that measures cosmic muon events. The present study looks at the pixel-wise time response of these RPCs in order to improve the relative time distribution and hence the up-down discrimination capability. After including the effect of propagation delay in the cable and pick-up panel the time resolution improves, in some cases, to $\leq~1~\rm{nsec}$ whereas in some cases there is no significant change. These results will help in significantly improving on the extraction of the directionality of muons produced in CC interactions of $\nu_{\mu}$ and $\bar{\nu}_{\mu}$.
  • We report on the simulation studies on the possibility of dark matter particle (DMP) decaying into leptonic modes. While not much is known about the properties of dark matter particles except through their gravitational effect, it has been recently conjectured that the so called "anomalous Kolar Events" observed some decades ago may be due to the decay of unstable dark matter particles (M.V.N. Murthy and G.Rajasekaran, Pramana, {\bf 82}, 609 (2014)). The aim of this study is to see if this conjecture can be verified at the proposed Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector at INO. We study the possible decay to leptonic modes which may be seen in this detector with some modifications. For the purposes of simulation we assume that each channel saturates the decay width for the mass ranging from $1-50 \rm{GeV/c^2}$. The aim is not only to investigate the decay signatures, but also, more generally, to establish lower bounds on the life time of DMP even if no such decay takes place.
  • The iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) will be used to measure neutrino mass hierarchy. The magnet in the ICAL detector will be used to distinguish the {\mu^-} and {\mu^+} events induced by {\nu_{\mu}} and {\bar{\nu_{\mu}}}, respectively. Due to the importance of the magnet in ICAL, an electromagnetic simulation has been carried out to study the B-field distribution in iron using various designs. The simulation shows better uniformity in the portion of the iron layer between the coils, which is bounded by regions which have lesser field strength as we move to the periphery of the iron layer. The ICAL magnet was configured to have a tiling structure that gave the minimum reluctance path while keeping a reasonably uniform field pattern.This translates into less Ampere-turns needed for generation of the required magnetic field. At low Ampere-turns, a larger fractional area with \vert B \vert \ge 1 Tesla (T) can be obtained by using a soft magnetic material. A study of the effect of the magnetic field on muon trajectories has been carried out using GEANT4. For muons up to 20 GeV, the energy resolution improves as the magnetic field increases from 1.1T to 1.8T. The charge identification efficiency for muons was found to be more than 90\% except for large zenith angles.
  • Sub-relativistic magnetic monopoles are predicted from the GUT era by theory. To date there have been no confirmed observations of such exotic particles. The Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) at India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) aims to measure the neutrino oscillation parameters precisely. As it is a tracking detector there is also the possibility of detecting magnetic monopoles in the sub-relativistic region. Using ICAL the magnetic monopole event is characterised by the large time intervals of upto 30 microsec between the signals in successive layers of the active detectors. The aim of this study is to identify the sensitivity of ICAL for a particle carrying magnetic charge in the mass range from 10^{5} to 10^{17} GeV with beta ranging from 10^{-5} to 9 x 10^{-1} for ICAL at INO. A similar study has also been carried out for the ICAL prototype which will be placed overground. Due to the rock cover of approximately 1.3 km, ICAL at INO will not be able to place bounds on the flux of the lower mass magnetic monopoles. This mass region is however addressed by the prototype ICAL.
  • An earlier measurement on the 4$^+$ to 2$^+$ radiative transition in $^8$Be provided the first electromagnetic signature of its dumbbell-like shape. However, the large uncertainty in the measured cross section does not allow a stringent test of nuclear structure models. The present paper reports a more elaborate and precise measurement for this transition, via the radiative capture in the $^4$He+$^4$He reaction, improving the accuracy by about a factor of three. The {\it ab initio} calculations of the radiative transition strength with improved three-nucleon forces are also presented. The experimental results are compared with the predictions of the alpha cluster model and {\it ab initio} calculations.
  • The damping of the nuclear shell effect with excitation energy has been measured through an analysis of the neutron spectra following the triton transfer in the $^7$Li induced reaction on $^{205}$Tl. The measured neutron spectra demonstrate the expected large shell correction energy for the nuclei in the vicinity of doubly magic $^{208}$Pb and a small value for $^{184}$W. A quantitative extraction of the allowed values of the damping parameter $\gamma$, along with those for the asymptotic nuclear level density parameter $\tilde{a}$, has been made for the first time.
  • A large area plastic scintillator detector array(~ 1 m x1m) has been set up for fast neutron spectroscopy at the BARC-TIFR Pelletron laboratory, Mumbai. The energy, time and position response has been measured for electrons using radioactive sources and for mono-energetic neutrons using the 7Li(p,n1)7Be*(0.429 MeV) reaction at proton energies between 6.3 and 19 MeV. A Monte Carlo simulation of the energy dependent efficiency of the array for neutron detection is in agreement with the 7Li(p,n1) measurements. The array has been used to measure the neutron spectrum, in the energy range of 4-12 MeV, in the reaction 12C+ 93Nb at E(12C)= 40 MeV. This is in reasonable agreement with a statistical model calculation.