• Micro and nano structures scatter light and amplify local electric fields very effectively. Energy incident as intense ultrashort laser pulses can be converted to x-rays and hot electrons more efficiently with a substrate that suitably modifies the local fields. Here we demonstrate that coating a plain glass surface with a few micron thick layer of an ubiquitous microbe, {\it Escherichia coli}, catapults the brightness of hard x-ray bremsstrahlung emission (up to 300 keV) by more than two orders of magnitude at an incident laser intensity of 10$^{16}$ W cm$^{-2}$. This increased yield is attributed to the local enhancement of electric fields around individual {\it E. coli} cells and is reproduced by detailed particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This combination of laser plasmas and biological targets can lead to turnkey, multi-kilohertz and environmentally safe sources of hard x-rays.
  • We report that liquids perform self-propelled motion when they are placed in contact with hot surfaces with asymmetric (ratchet-like) topology. The pumping effect is observed when the liquid is in the film-boiling regime, for many liquids and over a wide temperature range. We propose that liquid motion is driven by a viscous force exerted by vapor flow between the solid and the liquid.
  • We positionally match sources observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey. Practically all 2MASS sources are matched to an SDSS source within 2 arcsec; ~11% of them are optically resolved galaxies and the rest are dominated by stars. About 1/3 of FIRST sources are matched to an SDSS source within 2 arcsec; ~80% of these are galaxies and the rest are dominated by quasars. Based on these results, we project that by the completion of these surveys the matched samples will include about 10^7 stars and 10^6 galaxies observed by both SDSS and 2MASS, and about 250,000 galaxies and 50,000 quasars observed by both SDSS and FIRST. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the optical, infrared and radio properties for the extragalactic sources from the matched samples. In particular, we find that the fraction of quasars with stellar colors missed by the SDSS spectroscopic survey is probably not larger than ~10%, and that the optical colors of radio-loud quasars are ~0.05 mag. redder (with 4-sigma significance) than the colors of radio-quiet quasars.
  • We describe the target selection and resulting properties of a spectroscopic sample of luminous, red galaxies (LRG) from the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These galaxies are selected on the basis of color and magnitude to yield a sample of luminous, intrinsically red galaxies that extends fainter and further than the main flux-limited portion of the SDSS galaxy spectroscopic sample. The sample is designed to impose a passively-evolving luminosity and rest-frame color cut to a redshift of 0.38. Additional, yet more luminous, red galaxies are included to a redshift of 0.5. Approximately 12 of these galaxies per square degree are targeted for spectroscopy, so the sample will number over 100,000 with the full survey. SDSS commissioning data indicate that the algorithm efficiently selects luminous (M_g=-21.4), red galaxies, that the spectroscopic success rate is very high, and that the resulting set of galaxies is approximately volume-limited out to z=0.38. When the SDSS is complete, the LRG spectroscopic sample will fill over 1h^-3 Gpc^3 with an approximately homogeneous population of galaxies and will therefore be well suited to studies of large-scale structure and clusters out to z=0.5.
  • We study the $W_\infty$ algebra in the Calegero-Sutherland model using the exchange operators. The presence of all the sub-algebras of $W_\infty$ is shown in this model. A simplified proof for this algebra, in the symmetric ordered basics, is given. It is pointed out that the algebra contains in general, nonlinear terms. Possible connection to the nonlinear $W_\infty$ is discussed.