• Hot subdwarfs (sdO/Bs) are the helium-burning cores of red giants, which lost almost all of their hydrogen envelopes. This mass loss is often triggered by common envelope interactions with close stellar or even substellar companions. Cool companions like late-type stars or brown dwarfs are detectable via characteristic light curve variations like reflection effects and often also eclipses. To search for such objects we obtained multi-band light curves of 26 close sdO/B binary candidates from the MUCHFUSS project with the BUSCA instrument. We discovered a new eclipsing reflection effect system ($P=0.168938$~d) with a low-mass M dwarf companion ($0.116 M_{\rm \odot}$). Three more reflection effect binaries found in the course of the campaign were already published, two of them are eclipsing systems, in one system only showing the reflection effect but no eclipses the sdB primary is found to be pulsating. Amongst the targets without reflection effect a new long-period sdB pulsator was discovered and irregular light variations were found in two sdO stars. The found light variations allowed us to constrain the fraction of reflection effect binaries and the substellar companion fraction around sdB stars. The minimum fraction of reflection effect systems amongst the close sdB binaries might be greater than 15\% and the fraction of close substellar companions in sdB binaries might be as high as $8.0\%$. This would result in a close substellar companion fraction to sdB stars of about 3\%. This fraction is much higher than the fraction of brown dwarfs around possible progenitor systems, which are solar-type stars with substellar companions around 1 AU, as well as close binary white dwarfs with brown dwarf companions. This might be a hint that common envelope interactions with substellar objects are preferentially followed by a hot subdwarf phase.
  • MICADO will equip the E-ELT with a first light capability for diffraction limited imaging at near-infrared wavelengths. The instrument's observing modes focus on various flavours of imaging, including astrometric, high contrast, and time resolved. There is also a single object spectroscopic mode optimised for wavelength coverage at moderately high resolution. This contribution provides an overview of the key functionality of the instrument, outlining the scientific rationale for its observing modes. The interface between MICADO and the adaptive optics system MAORY that feeds it is summarised. The design of the instrument is discussed, focussing on the optics and mechanisms inside the cryostat, together with a brief overview of the other key sub-systems.
  • In the course of the MUCHFUSS project we have recently discovered four radial velocity (RV) variable, hot (Teff $\approx$ 80,000 - 110,000 K) post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Among them, we found the first known RV variable O(He) star, the only second known RV variable PG 1159 close binary candidate, as well as the first two naked (i.e., without planetary nebula (PN)) H-rich post-AGB stars of spectral type O(H) that show significant RV variations. We present a non-LTE spectral analysis of these stars along with one further O(H)-type star whose RV variations were found to be not significant. We also report the discovery of an far-infrared excess in the case of the PG 1159 star. None of the stars in our sample displays nebular emission lines, which can be explained well in terms of a very late thermal pulse evolution in the case of the PG 1159 star. The "missing" PNe around the O(H)-type stars seem strange, since we find that several central stars of PNe have much longer post-AGB times. Besides the non-ejection of a PN, the occurrence of a late thermal pulse, or the re-accretion of the PN in the previous post-AGB evolution offer possible explanations for those stars not harbouring a PN (anymore). In case of the O(He) star J0757 we speculate that it might have been previously part of a compact He transferring binary system. In this scenario, the mass transfer must have stopped after a certain time, leaving behind a low mass close companion that could be responsible for the extreme RV shift of 107.0 $\pm$ 22.0 km/s measured within only 31 min.
  • HD 188112 is a bright (V = 10.2 mag) hot subdwarf B (sdB) star with a mass too low to ignite core helium burning and is therefore considered as a pre-extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarf (WD). ELM WDs (M $\le$ 0.3 Msun) are He-core objects produced by the evolution of compact binary systems. We present in this paper a detailed abundance analysis of HD 188112 based on high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) near and far-ultraviolet spectroscopy. We also constrain the mass of the star's companion. We use hybrid non-LTE model atmospheres to fit the observed spectral lines and derive the abundances of more than a dozen elements as well as the rotational broadening of metallic lines. We confirm the previous binary system parameters by combining radial velocities measured in our UV spectra with the already published ones. The system has a period of 0.60658584 days and a WD companion with M $\geq$ 0.70 Msun. By assuming a tidally locked rotation, combined with the projected rotational velocity (v sin i = 7.9 $\pm$ 0.3 km s$^{-1}$) we constrain the companion mass to be between 0.9 and 1.3 Msun. We further discuss the future evolution of the system as a potential progenitor of a (underluminous) type Ia supernova. We measure abundances for Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn, as well as for the trans-iron elements Ga, Sn, and Pb. In addition, we derive upper limits for the C, N, O elements and find HD 188112 to be strongly depleted in carbon. We find evidence of non-LTE effects on the line strength of some ionic species such as Si II and Ni II. The metallic abundances indicate that the star is metal-poor, with an abundance pattern most likely produced by diffusion effects.
  • Hot subdwarf stars (sdO/Bs) are the stripped cores of red giants located at the bluest extension of the horizontal branch. They constitute the dominant population of UV-bright stars in old stellar environments and are most likely formed by binary interactions. We perform the first systematic, spectroscopic analysis of a sample of those stars in the Galactic halo based on data from SDSS. In the course of this project we discovered 177 close binary candidates. A significant fraction of the sdB binaries turned out to have close substellar companions, which shows that brown dwarfs and planets can significantly influence late stellar evolution. Close hot subdwarf binaries with massive white dwarf companions on the other hand are good candidates for the progenitors of type Ia supernovae. We discovered a hypervelocity star, which not only turned out to be the fastest unbound star known in our Galaxy, but also the surviving companion of such a supernova explosion.
  • We report the discovery of an eclipsing binary -- PTF1 J072456$+$125301-- composed of a subdwarf B (sdB) star ($g'=17.2^m$) with a faint companion. Subdwarf B stars are core helium-burning stars, which can be found on the extreme horizontal branch. About half of them reside in close binary systems, but few are known to be eclipsing, for which fundamental stellar parameters can be derived.\newline We conducted an analysis of photometric data and spectra from the Palomar 60'' and the 200" Hale telescope respectively. A quantitative spectral analysis found an effective temperature of $T_{\text{eff}}=33900\pm350$\,K, log g = $5.74\pm0.08$ and log($n_{\text{He}}/n_{\text{H}}) = -2.02 \pm0.07$, typical for an sdB star. The companion does not contribute to the optical light of the system, except through a distinct reflection effect. From the light curve an orbital period of 0.09980(25)\,d and a system inclination of $83.56\pm0.30\,^{\circ}$ were derived. The radial velocity curve yielded an orbital semi-amplitude of $K_1=95.8\pm 8.1\,\text{km s$^{-1}$}$. The mass for the M-type dwarf companion is $0.155\pm0.020\,M_{\odot}$. PTF1\,J072456$+$125301 has similar atmospheric parameters to those of pulsating sdB stars (V346 Hya stars). Therefore it could be a high-priority object for asteroseismology, if pulsations were detected such as in the enigmatic case of NY Vir.
  • HD188112 is an extremely low mass white dwarf in a close binary system. According to a previous study, the mass of HD188112 is $\sim$0.24 Msun and a lower limit of 0.73 Msun could be put for the mass of its unseen companion, a compact degenarate object. We used HST STIS spectra to measure the rotational broadening of UV metallic lines in HD188112, in order to put tighter constraints on the mass of its companion. By assuming that the system in is synchronous rotation, we derive a companion mass between 1.05 and 1.25 Msun. We also measure abundances for magnesium, silicon, and iron, respectively log $N$(X)/$N$(H) = $-$6.40, $-$7.25, and $-$5.81. The radial velocities measured from the UV spectra are found to be in very good agreement with the prediction based on the orbital parameters derived in the previous study made a decade ago.
  • Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are evolved, core helium-burning objects located on the extreme horizontal branch. Their formation history is still puzzling as the sdB progenitors must lose nearly all of their hydrogen envelope during the red-giant phase. About half of the known sdBs are in close binaries with periods from 1.2 h to a few days, a fact that implies they experienced a common-envelope phase. Eclipsing hot subdwarf binaries (also called HW Virginis systems) are rare but important objects for determining fundamental stellar parameters. Even more significant and uncommon are those binaries containing a pulsating sdB, as the mass can be determined independently by asteroseismology. Here we present a first analysis of the eclipsing hot subdwarf binary V2008-1753. The light curve shows a total eclipse, a prominent reflection effect, and low--amplitude pulsations with periods from 150 to 180 s. An analysis of the light-- and radial velocity (RV) curves indicates a mass ratio close to $ q = 0.146$, an RV semi-amplitude of $K=54.6 \,\rm kms^{-1}$, and an inclination of $i=86.8^\circ$. Combining these results with our spectroscopic determination of the surface gravity, $\log \,g = 5.83$, the best--fitting model yields an sdB mass of 0.47$M_{\rm \odot}$ and a companion mass of $69 M_{\rm Jup}$. As the latter mass is below the hydrogen-burning limit, V2008-1753 represents the first HW Vir system known consisting of a pulsating sdB and a brown dwarf companion. Consequently, it holds great potential for better constraining models of sdB binary evolution and asteroseismology.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims to find sdBs with compact companions like massive white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes. Here we provide classifications, atmospheric parameters and a complete radial velocity (RV) catalogue containing 1914 single measurements for an sample of 177 hot subluminous stars discovered based on SDSS DR7. 110 stars show significant RV variability, while 67 qualify as candidates. We constrain the fraction of close massive compact companions {of hydrogen-rich hot subdwarfs} in our sample to be smaller than $\sim1.3\%$, which is already close to the theoretical predictions. However, the sample might still contain such binaries with longer periods exceeding $\sim8\,{\rm d}$. We detect a mismatch between the $\Delta RV_{\rm max}$-distribution of the sdB and the more evolved sdOB and sdO stars, which challenges our understanding of their evolutionary connection. Furthermore, irregular RV variations of unknown origin with amplitudes of up to $\sim180\,{\rm km\,s^{-1}}$ on timescales of years, days and even hours have been detected in some He-sdO stars. They might be connected to irregular photometric variations in some cases.
  • Hot subdwarfs (sdBs) are core helium-burning stars, which lost almost their entire hydrogen envelope in the red-giant phase. Since a high fraction of those stars are in close binary systems, common envelope ejection is an important formation channel. We identified a total population of 51 close sdB+WD binaries based on time-resolved spectroscopy and multi-band photometry, derive the WD mass distribution and constrain the future evolution of these systems. Most WDs in those binaries have masses significantly below the average mass of single WDs and a high fraction of them might therefore have helium cores. We found 12 systems that will merge in less than a Hubble time and evolve to become either massive C/O WDs, AM\,CVn systems, RCrB stars or even explode as supernovae type Ia.
  • Some young, massive stars can be found in the Galactic halo. As star formation is unlikely to occur in the halo, they must have been formed in the disk and been ejected shortly afterwards. One explanation is a supernova in a tight binary system. The companion is ejected and becomes a runaway star. HD\,271791 is the kinematically most extreme runaway star known (Galactic restframe velocity $725 \pm 195\, \rm km\,s^{-1}$, which is even larger than the Galactic escape velocity). Moreover, an analysis of the optical spectrum showed an enhancement of the $\alpha$-process elements. This indicates the capture of supernova ejecta, and therefore an origin in a core-collapse supernova. As such high space velocities are not reached by the runaway stars in classical binary supernova ejection scenarios, a very massive but compact primary, probably of Wolf-Rayet type is required. HD\,271791 is therefore a perfect candidate for studying nucleosynthesis in a supernova of probably type Ibc. The goal of this project is to determine the abundances of a large number of elements from the $\alpha$-process, the iron group, and heavier elements by a quantitative analysis of the optical and UV spectral range. Detailed line-formation calculations are employed that account for deviations from local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE). We intend to verify whether core-collapse supernova are a site of r-process element production. Here, we state the current status of the project.
  • Hot subdwarf stars of spectral type B (sdBs) are evolved, core helium-burning objects. The formation of those objects is puzzling, because the progenitor star has to lose almost its entire hydrogen envelope in the red-giant phase. Binary interactions have been invoked, but single sdBs exist as well. We report the discovery of two close hot subdwarf binaries with small radial velocity amplitudes. Follow-up photometry revealed reflection effects originating from cool irradiated companions, but no eclipses. The lower mass limits for the companions of CPD-64$^{\circ}$481 ($0.048\,M_{\rm \odot}$) and PHL\,457 ($0.027\,M_{\rm \odot}$) are significantly below the stellar mass limit. Hence they could be brown dwarfs unless the inclination is unfavourable. Two very similar systems have already been reported. The probability that none of them is a brown dwarf is very small, 0.02%. Hence we provide further evidence that substellar companions with masses that low are able to eject a common envelope and form an sdB star. Furthermore, we find that the properties of the observed sample of hot subdwarfs in reflection effect binaries is consistent with a scenario where single sdBs can still be formed via common envelope events, but their low-mass substellar companions do not survive.
  • In course of the MUCHFUSS project we found two new HW Virginis systems. J192059+372220 (J1920) has an orbital period of 0.169 d and an M dwarf companion with a mass of $0.116 M_{\odot}$. J162256+473051 (J1622) has the shortest period (0.069 d) of all known HW Virginis systems. Its companion has a mass of $0.0635\pm 0.004 M_{\odot}$ and is therefore the second close brown dwarf found orbiting a subdwarf B star.
  • Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are core helium-burning stars located on the extreme horizontal branch. About half of the known sdB stars are found in close binaries. Their short orbital periods of 1.2 h to a few days suggest that they are post common-envelope systems. Eclipsing hot subdwarf binaries are rare, but important to determine the fundamental stellar parameters. Low-mass companions are identified by the reflection effect. In most cases the companion is a main sequence star near the stellar mass limit. Here we report the discovery of an eclipsing hot subdwarf binary SDSS J162256.66+473051.1 (J1622) of very short orbital period (0.0697 d), found in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. The lightcurve shows grazing eclipses and a prominent reflection effect. An analysis of the light- and radial velocity (RV) curves indicated a mass ratio of $q=$ 0.1325, an RV semiamplitude $K=47.2\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$, and an inclination of $i=72.33^\circ$. We show that a companion mass of 0.064 $M_{\rm \odot}$, well below the hydrogen-burning limit, is the most plausible solution, which implies a mass close to the canonical mass (0.47 $M_{\rm \odot}$) of the sdB star. Therefore, the companion is a brown dwarf, which not only survived the engulfment by the red-giant envelope, but also triggered its ejection, and enabled the sdB star to form. The rotation of J1622 is expected to be tidally locked to the orbit. However, J1622 rotates too slowly ($v_{\rm rot}=74.5\pm 7\rm\,km\,s^{-1}$) to be synchronized, challenging tidal interaction models.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (muchfuss) aims to discover subdwarf-B stars with massive compact companions such as overmassive white dwarfs (M > 1.0 M_sun), neutron stars or black holes. From the 127 subdwarfs with substantial radial-velocity variations discovered in the initial survey, a number of interesting objects have been selected for extensive follow-up. After an initial photometry run with BUSCA revealed that FBS 0117+396 is photometrically variable both on long and short timescales, we chose it as an auxiliary target during a 6-night multi-color photometry run with Ultracam. Spectroscopy was obtained at a number of observatories in order to determine the binary period and obtain a radial-velocity amplitude. After establishing an orbital period of P = 0.252 d, and removing the signal associated with the irradiated hemisphere of the M-dwarf companion, we were able to detect ten pulsation periods in the Fourier spectrum of the light curve. Two pulsation modes are found to have short periods of 337 and 379 s, and at least eight modes are found with periods between 45 minutes and 2.5 hours. This establishes that FBS 0117+396 is an sdB+dM reflection binary, in which the primary is a hybrid pulsator, and the first one found with this particular melange of flavours.
  • We started a new project which aims to find compact hot subdwarf binaries at low Galactic latitudes. Targets are selected from several photometric surveys and a spectroscopic follow-up campaign to find radial velocity variations on timescales as short as tens of minutes has been started. Once radial variations are detected phase-resolved spectroscopy is obtained to measure the radial velocity curve and the mass function of the system. The observing strategy is described and the discovery of two short period hot subdwarf binaries is presented. UVEXJ032855.25+503529.8 contains a hot subdwarf B star (sdB) orbited by a cool M-dwarf in a P=0.11017 days orbit. The lightcurve shows a strong reflection effect but no eclipses are visible. HS 1741+2133 is a short period (P=0.20 days) sdB most likely with a white dwarf (WD) companion.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) are the most important standard candles for measuring the expansion history of the universe. The thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf can explain their observed properties, but neither the progenitor systems nor any stellar remnants have been conclusively identified. Underluminous SN Ia have been proposed to originate from a so-called double-detonation of a white dwarf. After a critical amount of helium is deposited on the surface through accretion from a close companion, the helium is ignited causing a detonation wave that triggers the explosion of the white dwarf itself. We have discovered both shallow transits and eclipses in the tight binary system CD-30 11223 composed of a carbon/oxygen white dwarf and a hot helium star, allowing us to determine its component masses and fundamental parameters. In the future the system will transfer mass from the helium star to the white dwarf. Modelling this process we find that the detonation in the accreted helium layer is sufficiently strong to trigger the explosion of the core. The helium star will then be ejected at so large a velocity that it will escape the Galaxy. The predicted properties of this remnant are an excellent match to the so-called hypervelocity star US 708, a hot, helium-rich star moving at more than 750 km/s, sufficient to leave the Galaxy. The identification of both progenitor and remnant provides a consistent picture of the formation and evolution of underluminous type Ia supernovae.
  • We report the discovery of a bright (V=11.6 mag) eclipsing hot subdwarf binary of spectral type B with a late main sequence companion from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS 102322-3737.0). Such systems are called HW Vir stars after the prototype. The lightcurve shows a grazing eclipse and a strong reflection effect. An orbital period of P=0.13927 d, an inclination of i=65.86{\deg}, a mass ratio q=0.34, a radial velocity semiamplitude K_1=81.0 kms^-1, and other parameters are derived from a combined spectroscopic and photometric analysis. The short period can only be explained by a common envelope origin of the system. The atmospheric parameters (T_eff=28400 K, log g=5.60) are consistent with a core helium-burning star located on the extreme horizontal branch. In agreement with that we derived the most likely sdB mass to be M_sdB=0.46M_sun, close to the canonical mass of such objects. The companion is a late M-dwarf with a mass of M_comp=0.16 M_sun. ASAS 102322-3737.0 is the third brightest of only 12 known HW Virginis systems, which makes it an ideal target for detailed spectroscopic studies and long term photometric monitoring to search for period variations, e.g. caused by a substellar companion.
  • We report the discovery of an extremely close, eclipsing binary system. A white dwarf is orbited by a core He-burning compact hot subdwarf star with a period as short as $\simeq0.04987 {\rm d}$ making this system the most compact hot subdwarf binary discovered so far. The subdwarf will start to transfer helium-rich material on short timescales of less than $50 {\rm Myr}$. The ignition of He-burning at the surface may trigger carbon-burning in the core although the WD is less massive than the Chandrasekhar limit ($>0.74\,M_{\rm \odot}$) making this binary a possible progenitor candidate for a supernova type Ia event.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions (white dwarfs with masses $M>1.0 {\rm M_{\odot}}$, neutron stars or black holes). The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution calculations and some candidate systems have been found. We identified $\simeq1100$ hot subdwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Stars with high velocities have been reobserved and individual SDSS spectra have been analysed. About 70 radial velocity variable subdwarfs have been selected as good candidates for follow-up time resolved spectroscopy to derive orbital parameters and photometric follow-up to search for features like eclipses in the light curves. Up to now we found nine close binary sdBs with short orbital periods ranging from $\simeq0.07 {\rm d}$ to $1.5 {\rm d}$. Two of them are eclipsing binaries with companions that are most likely of substellar nature.
  • The project Massive Unseen Companions to Hot Faint Underluminous Stars from SDSS (MUCHFUSS) aims at finding hot subdwarf stars with massive compact companions (massive white dwarfs M>1.0 Msun, neutron stars or stellar mass black holes). The existence of such systems is predicted by binary evolution theory and some candidate systems have been found. We classified about 1400 hot subdwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by colour selection and visual inspection of their spectra. Stars with high velocities have been reobserved and individual SDSS spectra have been analysed. In total 201 radial velocity variable subdwarfs have been discovered and about 140 of them have been selected as good candidates for follow-up time resolved spectroscopy to derive their orbital parameters and photometric follow-up to search for features like eclipses in the light curves. Up to now we found seven close binary sdBs with short orbital periods ranging from 0.21 d to 1.5 d and two eclipsing binaries with companions that are most likely of substellar nature. A new pulsating sdB in a close binary system has been discovered as well.
  • It has been suggested that besides stellar companions, substellar objects in close orbits may be able to trigger mass loss in a common envelope phase and form hot subdwarfs. In an ongoing project we search for close substellar companions combining time resolved high resolution spectroscopy with photometry. We determine the fraction of as yet undetected radial velocity variable systems from a sample of 27 apparently single sdB stars to be 16%. We discovered low-mass stellar companions to the He-sdB CPD-20 1123 and the pulsator KPD 0629-0016. The brown dwarf reported to orbit the eclipsing binary SDSS J0820+0008 could be confirmed by an analysis of high resolution spectra taken with UVES. Reflection effects have been detected in the light curves of the known sdB binaries CPD-64 481 and BPS CS 22169-0001. The inclinations of these systems must be much higher than expected and the most likely companion masses are in the substellar regime. Finally, we determined the orbit of the sdB binary PHL 457, which has a very small radial velocity amplitude and may host the lowest mass substellar companion known. The implications of these new results for the open question of sdB formation are discussed.
  • Hot subdwarf B stars (sdBs) are extreme horizontal branch stars believed to originate from close binary evolution. Indeed about half of the known sdB stars are found in close binaries with periods ranging from a few hours to a few days. The enormous mass loss required to remove the hydrogen envelope of the red-giant progenitor almost entirely can be explained by common envelope ejection. A rare subclass of these binaries are the eclipsing HW Vir binaries where the sdB is orbited by a dwarf M star. Here we report the discovery of an HW Vir system in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. A most likely substellar object ($\simeq0.068\,M_{\rm \odot}$) was found to orbit the hot subdwarf J08205+0008 with a period of 0.096 days. Since the eclipses are total, the system parameters are very well constrained. J08205+0008 has the lowest unambiguously measured companion mass yet found in a subdwarf B binary. This implies that the most likely substellar companion has not only survived the engulfment by the red-giant envelope, but also triggered its ejection and enabled the sdB star to form. The system provides evidence that brown dwarfs may indeed be able to significantly affect late stellar evolution.
  • The formation of hot subdwarf stars (sdBs), which are core helium-burning stars located on the extended horizontal branch, is still not understood. Many of the known hot subdwarf stars reside in close binary systems with short orbital periods between a few hours and a few days with either M star or white dwarf companions. Common envelope ejection is the most probable formation channel. Among these, eclipsing systems are of special importance because it is possible to constrain the parameters of both components tightly by combining spectroscopic and light curve analyses. We report the discovery of two eclipsing binaries with a brown dwarf (< 0.07 M*) and a 0.15 M* late main sequence star companion in close orbits around sdB stars.
  • We give a brief review over the observational evidence for close substellar companions to hot subdwarf stars. The formation of these core helium-burning objects requires huge mass loss of their red giant progenitors. It has been suggested that besides stellar companions substellar objects in close orbits may be able to trigger this mass loss. Such objects can be easily detected around hot subdwarf stars by medium or high resolution spectroscopy with an RV accuracy at the km/s-level. Eclipsing systems of HW Vir type stick out of transit surveys because of their characteristic light curves. The best evidence that substellar objects in close orbits around sdBs exist and that they are able to trigger the required mass loss is provided by the eclipsing system SDSS J0820+0008, which was found in the course of the MUCHFUSS project. Furthermore, several candidate systems have been discovered.