• We model the velocity dispersion of the ultra-diffuse galaxy NGC 1052-DF2 using Newtonian gravity and modified gravity (MOG). The velocity dispersion predicted by MOG is higher than the Newtonian gravity prediction, but it is fully consistent with the observed velocity dispersion that is obtained from the motion of 10 globular clusters.
  • We investigate gravitational lensing in the context of the MOG modified theory of gravity. Using a formulation of the theory with no adjustable or fitted parameters, we present the MOG equations of motion for slow, nonrelativistic test particles and for ultrarelativistic test particles, such as rays of light. We demonstrate how the MOG prediction for the bending of light can be applied to astronomical observations. Our investigation first focuses on a small set of strong lensing observations where the properties of the lensing objects are found to be consistent with the predictions of the theory. We also present an analysis of the colliding clusters 1E0657-558 (known also as the Bullet Cluster) and Abell 520; in both cases, the predictions of the MOG theory are in good agreement with observation.
  • Modified gravity (MOG) is a covariant, relativistic, alternative gravitational theory whose field equations are derived from an action that supplements the spacetime metric tensor with vector and scalar fields. Both gravitational (spin 2) and electromagnetic waves travel on null geodesics of the theory's one metric. Despite a recent claim to the contrary, MOG satisfies the weak equivalence principle and is consistent with observations of the neutron star merger and gamma ray burster event GW170817/GRB170817A.
  • Galaxy rotation curves determined observationally out to a radius well beyond the galaxy cores can provide a critical test of modified gravity models without dark matter. The predicted rotational velocity curve obtained from Scalar-Vector-Tensor Gravity (STVG or MOG) is in excellent agreement with data for the Milky Way without a dark matter halo, with a mass of $5\times 10^{10}\,M_{\odot}$. The velocity rotation curve predicted by modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) does not agree with the data.
  • The Karlhede invariant is formed from the contraction of the covariant derivative of the Riemann tensor. It is a coordinate invariant that vanishes at the Schwarzschild event horizon $r=2m$. The vanishing of the invariant allows an observer to construct a local measuring device and use it to detect an event horizon while falling into a black hole. Recent proposals postulate the existence of a "firewall" at the event horizon that may incinerate an infalling observer. These proposals face an apparent paradox if a freely falling observer detects nothing special in the vicinity of the horizon. The behavior of Karlhede's invariant raises the possibility that the event horizon is a real physical membrane with measurable properties that are detectable by a freely falling observer.
  • Our modified gravity theory (MOG) is a gravitational theory without exotic dark matter, based on an action principle. MOG has been used successfully to model astrophysical phenomena such as galaxy rotation curves, galaxy cluster masses, and lensing. MOG may also be able to account for cosmological observations. We assume that the MOG point source solution can be used to describe extended distributions of matter via an appropriately modified Poisson equation. We use this result to model perturbation growth in MOG and find that it agrees well with the observed matter power spectrum at present. As the resolution of the power spectrum improves with increasing survey size, however, significant differences emerge between the predictions of MOG and the standard LCDM model, as in the absence of exotic dark matter, oscillations of the power spectrum in MOG are not suppressed. We can also use MOG to model the acoustic power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background. A suitably adapted semi-analytical model offers a first indication that MOG may pass this test, and correctly model the peak of the acoustic spectrum.
  • We explore the cosmological consequences of Modified Gravity (MOG), and find that it provides, using a minimal number of parameters, good fits to data, including CMB temperature anisotropy, galaxy power spectrum, and supernova luminosity-distance observations without exotic dark matter. MOG predicts a bouncing cosmology with a vacuum energy term that yields accelerating expansion and an age of ~13 billion years.
  • We comment on arXiv:1112.1320 and point out that baryonic oscillations of the matter power spectrum, while predicted by theories that do not incorporate collisionless cold dark matter, are strongly suppressed by the statistical window function that is used to process finite-sized galaxy samples. We assert that with present-day data sets, the slope of the matter power spectrum is a much stronger indicator of a theory's validity. We also argue that MOND should not be used as a strawman theory as it is not in general representative of modified gravity theories; some theories, notably our scalar-vector-tensor MOdified Gravity (MOG), offer much more successful predictions of cosmological observations.
  • Our modified gravity theory (MOG) was used successfully in the past to explain a range of astronomical and cosmological observations, including galaxy rotation curves, the CMB acoustic peaks, and the galaxy mass power spectrum. MOG was also used successfully to explain the unusual features of the Bullet Cluster 1E0657-558 without exotic dark matter. In the present work, we derive the relativistic equations of motion in the spherically symmetric field of a point source in MOG and, in particular, we derive equations for light bending and lensing. Our results also have broader applications in the case of extended distributions of matter, and they can be used to validate the Bullet Cluster results and provide a possible explanation for the merging clusters in Abell 520.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) provides data on several hundred thousand galaxies. Precise location of these galaxies in the sky, along with information about their luminosities and line-of-sight (Doppler) velocities allows one to construct a three-dimensional map of their location and estimate their line-of-sight velocity dispersion. This information, in principle, allows one to test dynamical gravity models, specifically models of satellite galaxy velocity dispersions near massive hosts. A key difficulty is the separation of true satellites from interlopers. We sidestep this problem by not attempting to derive satellite galaxy velocity dispersions from the data, but instead incorporate an interloper background into the mathematical models and compare the result to the actual data. We find that due to the presence of interlopers, it is not possible to exclude several gravitational theories on the basis of the SDSS data.
  • We investigate the properties of a Finite Electroweak (FEW) Theory first proposed in 1991. The theory predicts a running of the electroweak coupling constants and a suppression of tree level amplitudes, ensuring unitarity without a Higgs particle. We demonstrate this explicitly by calculating W_L^+W_L^- -> W_L^+W_L^- and e+e- -> W_L^+W_L^- in both the electroweak Standard Model and the FEW model.
  • We apply our scalar-tensor-vector (STVG) modified gravity theory (MOG) to calculate the infall velocities of the two clusters constituting the Bullet Cluster 1E0657-06. In the absence of an applicable two-body solution to the MOG field equations, we adopt an approximate acceleration formula based on the spherically symmetric, static, vacuum solution of the theory in the presence of a point source. We find that this formula predicts an infall velocity of the two clusters that is consistent with estimates based on hydrodynamic simulations.
  • An electroweak model in which the masses of the W and Z bosons and the fermions are generated by quantum loop graphs through a symmetry breaking is investigated. The model is based on a regularized quantum field theory in which the quantum loop graphs are finite to all orders of perturbation theory and the massless theory is gauge invariant, Poincare invariant, and unitary. The breaking of the electroweak symmetry SU_L(2) X U_Y(1) is achieved without a Higgs particle. A fundamental energy scale \Lambda_W (not to be confused with a naive cutoff) enters the theory through the regularization of the Feynman loop diagrams. The finite regularized theory with \Lambda_W allows for a fitting of low energy electroweak data. \Lambda_W ~ 542 GeV is determined at the Z pole by fitting it to the Z mass m_Z, and anchoring the value of \sin^2\theta_w to its experimental value at the Z pole yields a prediction for the W mass m_W that is accurate to about 0.5% without radiative corrections. The scattering amplitudes for W_LW_L -> W_LW_L and e+e- -> W_L^+W_L^- processes do not violate unitarity at high energies due to the suppression of the amplitudes by the running of the coupling constants at vertices. There is no Higgs hierarchy fine-tuning problem in the model. The unitary tree level amplitudes for W_LW_L -> W_LW_L scattering and e+e- -> W_L^+W_L^- annihilation, predicted by the finite electroweak model are compared with the amplitudes obtained from the standard model with Higgs exchange. These predicted amplitudes can be used to distinguish at the LHC between the standard electroweak model and the Higgsless model.
  • We comment on a recent paper by Deng et al. (Phys. Rev. D 79, 044014 (2009), arXiv:0901.3730) in which the Eddington-Robertson parameters for our modified gravity theory (MOG) are derived. We show by explicit calculation that the role of the vector field $\phi_\mu$ cannot be ignored in this derivation.
  • An electroweak model in which the masses of the W and Z bosons and the fermions are generated by quantum loop graphs through a symmetry breaking is investigated. The model is based on a regularized quantum field theory in which the quantum loop graphs are finite to all orders of perturbation theory and the massless theory is gauge invariant, Poincare invariant, and unitary. The breaking of the electroweak symmetry SU(2) X U(1) is achieved without a Higgs particle. A fundamental energy scale of ~542 GeV (not to be confused with a naive cutoff) enters the theory through the regularization of the Feynman loop diagrams. The theory yields a prediction for the W mass that is accurate to about 0.5% without radiative corrections. The scattering amplitudes for WW -> WW and e+e- -> WW processes do not violate unitarity at high energies due to the suppression of the amplitudes by the running of the coupling constants at vertices.
  • MOG is a fully relativistic modified theory of gravity based on an action principle. The MOG field equations are exactly solvable numerically in two important cases. In the spherically symmetric, static case of a gravitating mass, the equations also admit an approximate solution that closely resembles the Reissner-Nordstrom metric. Furthermore, for weak gravitational fields, a Yukawa-type modification to the Newtonian acceleration law can be obtained, which can be used to model a range of astronomical observations. Without nonbaryonic dark matter, MOG provides good agreement with the data for galaxy rotation curves, galaxy cluster masses, and gravitational lensing, while predicting no appreciable deviation from Einstein's predictions on the scale of the solar system. Another solution of the field equations is obtained for the case of a a spatially homogeneous, isotropic cosmology. MOG predicts an accelerating universe without introducing Einstein's cosmological constant; it also predicts a CMB acoustic power spectrum and a mass power spectrum that are consistent with observations without relying on non-baryonic dark matter. Increased sensitivity in future observations or space-based experiments may be sufficient to distinguish MOG from other theories, notably the LCDM "standard model" of cosmology.
  • Modified gravity theory is known to violate Birkhoff's theorem. We explore a key consequence of this violation, the effect of distant matter in the Universe on the motion of test particles. We find that when a particle is accelerated, a force is experienced that is proportional to the particle's mass and acceleration and acts in the direction opposite to that of the acceleration. We identify this force with inertia. At very low accelerations, our inertial law deviates slightly from that of Newton, yielding a testable prediction that may be verified with relatively simple experiments. Our conclusions apply to all gravity theories that reduce to a Yukawa-like force in the weak field approximation.
  • Modified Gravity (MOG) has been used successfully to explain the rotation curves of galaxies, the motion of galaxy clusters, the Bullet Cluster, and cosmological observations without the use of dark matter or Einstein's cosmological constant. We now have the ability to demonstrate how these solutions can be obtained directly from the action principle, without resorting to the use of fitted parameters or empirical formulae. We obtain numerical solutions to the theory's field equations that are exact in the sense that no terms are omitted, in two important cases: the spherically symmetric, static vacuum solution and the cosmological case of an homogeneous, isotropic universe. We compare these results to selected astrophysical and cosmological observations.
  • A modified gravity (MOG) theory, that has been successfully fitted to galaxy rotational velocity data, cluster data, the Bullet Cluster 1E0657-56 and cosmological observations, is shown to be in good agreement with the motion of satellite galaxies around host galaxies at distances 50-400 kpc.
  • Globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way have characteristic velocity dispersions that are consistent with the predictions of Newtonian gravity, and may be at odds with Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). We discuss a modified gravity (MOG) theory that successfully predicts galaxy rotation curves, galaxy cluster masses and velocity dispersions, lensing, and cosmological observations, yet produces predictions consistent with Newtonian theory for smaller systems, such as GCs. MOG produces velocity dispersion predictions for GCs that are independent of the distance from the galactic center, which may not be the case for MOND. New observations of distant GCs may produce strong criteria that can be used to distinguish between competing gravitational theories.