• Interferometric phase measurement is widely used to precisely determine quantities such as length, speed, and material properties. Without quantum correlations, the best phase sensitivity $\Delta\varphi$ achievable using $n$ photons is the shot noise limit (SNL), $\Delta\varphi=1/\sqrt{n}$. Quantum-enhanced metrology promises better sensitivity, but despite theoretical proposals stretching back decades, no measurement using photonic (i.e. definite photon number) quantum states has truly surpassed the SNL. Rather, all such demonstrations --- by discounting photon loss, detector inefficiency, or other imperfections --- have considered only a subset of the photons used. Here, we use an ultra-high efficiency photon source and detectors to perform unconditional entanglement-enhanced photonic interferometry. Sampling a birefringent phase shift, we demonstrate precision beyond the SNL without artificially correcting our results for loss and imperfections. Our results enable quantum-enhanced phase measurements at low photon flux and open the door to the next generation of optical quantum metrology advances.
  • Large-scale quantum networks will employ telecommunication-wavelength photons to exchange quantum information between remote measurement, storage, and processing nodes via fibre-optic channels. Quantum memories compatible with telecommunication-wavelength photons are a key element towards building such a quantum network. Here, we demonstrate the storage and retrieval of heralded 1532 nm-wavelength photons using a solid-state waveguide quantum memory. The heralded photons are derived from a photon-pair source that is based on parametric down-conversion, and our quantum memory is based on a 6 GHz-bandwidth atomic frequency comb prepared using an inhomogeneously broadened absorption line of a cryogenically-cooled erbium-doped lithium niobate waveguide. Using persistent spectral hole burning under varying magnetic fields, we determine that the memory is enabled by population transfer into niobium and lithium nuclear spin levels. Despite limited storage time and efficiency, our demonstration represents an important step towards quantum networks that operate in the telecommunication band and the development of on-chip quantum technology using industry-standard crystals.
  • Entanglement is the key resource for many long-range quantum information tasks, including secure communication and fundamental tests of quantum physics. These tasks require robust verification of shared entanglement, but performing it over long distances is presently technologically intractable because the loss through an optical fiber or free-space channel opens up a detection loophole. We design and experimentally demonstrate a scheme that verifies entanglement in the presence of at least $14.8\pm0.1$ dB of added loss, equivalent to approximately $80$ km of telecommunication fiber. Our protocol relies on entanglement swapping to herald the presence of a photon after the lossy channel, enabling event-ready implementation of quantum steering. This result overcomes the key barrier in device-independent communication under realistic high-loss scenarios and in the realization of a quantum repeater.
  • We study magnitudes and temperature dependences of the electron-electron and electron-phonon interaction times which play the dominant role in the formation and relaxation of photon induced hotspot in two dimensional amorphous WSi films. The time constants are obtained through magnetoconductance measurements in perpendicular magnetic field in the superconducting fluctuation regime and through time-resolved photoresponse to optical pulses. The excess magnetoconductivity is interpreted in terms of the weak-localization effect and superconducting fluctuations. Aslamazov-Larkin, and Maki-Thompson superconducting fluctuation alone fail to reproduce the magnetic field dependence in the relatively high magnetic field range when the temperature is rather close to Tc because the suppression of the electronic density of states due to the formation of short lifetime Cooper pairs needs to be considered. The time scale {\tau}_i of inelastic scattering is ascribed to a combination of electron-electron ({\tau}_(e-e)) and electron-phonon ({\tau}_(e-ph)) interaction times, and a characteristic electron-fluctuation time ({\tau}_(e-fl)), which makes it possible to extract their magnitudes and temperature dependences from the measured {\tau}_i. The ratio of phonon-electron ({\tau}_(ph-e)) and electron-phonon interaction times is obtained via measurements of the optical photoresponse of WSi microbridges. Relatively large {\tau}_(e-ph)/{\tau}_(ph-e) and {\tau}_(e-ph)/{\tau}_(e-e) ratios ensure that in WSi the photon energy is more efficiently confined in the electron subsystem than in other materials commonly used in the technology of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs). We discuss the impact of interaction times on the hotspot dynamics and compare relevant metrics of SNSPDs from different materials.
  • For photon-counting applications at ultraviolet wavelengths, there are currently no detectors that combine high efficiency (> 50%), sub-nanosecond timing resolution, and sub-Hz dark count rates. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) have seen success over the past decade for photon-counting applications in the near-infrared, but little work has been done to optimize SNSPDs for wavelengths below 400 nm. Here, we describe the design, fabrication, and characterization of UV SNSPDs operating at wavelengths between 250 and 370 nm. The detectors have active areas up to 56 ${\mu}$m in diameter, 70 - 80% efficiency, timing resolution down to 60 ps FWHM, blindness to visible and infrared photons, and dark count rates of ~ 0.25 counts/hr for a 56 ${\mu}$m diameter pixel. By using the amorphous superconductor MoSi, these UV SNSPDs are also able to operate at temperatures up to 4.2 K. These performance metrics make UV SNSPDs ideal for applications in trapped-ion quantum information processing, lidar studies of the upper atmosphere, UV fluorescent-lifetime imaging microscopy, and photon-starved UV astronomy.
  • We present an alternative approach to the fabrication of highly efficient superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) based on tungsten silicide. Using well-established technologies for the deposition of dielectric mirrors and anti-reflection coatings in conjunction with an embedded WSi bilayer photon absorber structure, we fabricated a bandwidth-enhanced detector. It exhibits system detection efficiencies (SDE) higher than $\left(87.1\pm1.3\right)\,\%$ in the range from $1450\,\mathrm{nm}$ to $1640\,\mathrm{nm}$, with a maximum of $\left(92.9\pm1.1\right)\,\%$ at $1515\,\mathrm{nm}$. Our measurements indicate SDE enhancements of up to $\left(18.4\pm1.7\right)\,\%$ over a single-absorber WSi SNSPD. The latter has been optimized for 1550 nm for comparison and exhibits maximum SDE of $\left(93.5\pm1.2\right)\,\%$ at 1555 nm. We emphasize that our technological approach has been tested with, but is not limited to, the wavelengths and absorber material presented here. It could be adapted flexibly for multi-color detector systems from the ultraviolet to the mid-infrared wavelength range. This bears the potential for significant improvements in many current quantum optical experiments and applications as well as for detector commercialization.
  • We experimentally realize a measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) system based on cost-effective and commercially available hardware such as distributed feedback (DFB) lasers and field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) that enable time-bin qubit preparation and time-tagging, and active feedback systems that allow for compensation of time-varying properties of photons after transmission through deployed fibre. We examine the performance of our system, and conclude that its design does not compromise performance. Our demonstration paves the way for MDI-QKD-based quantum networks in star-type topology that extend over more than 100 km distance.
  • Multiplexed quantum memories capable of storing and processing entangled photons are essential for the development of quantum networks. In this context, we demonstrate the simultaneous storage and retrieval of two entangled photons inside a solid-state quantum memory and measure a temporal multimode capacity of ten modes. This is achieved by producing two polarization entangled pairs from parametric down conversion and mapping one photon of each pair onto a rare-earth-ion doped (REID) crystal using the atomic frequency comb (AFC) protocol. We develop a concept of indirect entanglement witnesses, which can be used as Schmidt number witness, and we use it to experimentally certify the presence of more than one entangled pair retrieved from the quantum memory. Our work puts forward REID-AFC as a platform compatible with temporal multiplexing of several entangled photon pairs along with a new entanglement certification method useful for the characterisation of multiplexed quantum memories.
  • We present a loophole-free violation of local realism using entangled photon pairs. We ensure that all relevant events in our Bell test are spacelike separated by placing the parties far enough apart and by using fast random number generators and high-speed polarization measurements. A high-quality polarization-entangled source of photons, combined with high-efficiency, low-noise, single-photon detectors, allows us to make measurements without requiring any fair-sampling assumptions. Using a hypothesis test, we compute p-values as small as $5.9\times 10^{-9}$ for our Bell violation while maintaining the spacelike separation of our events. We estimate the degree to which a local realistic system could predict our measurement choices. Accounting for this predictability, our smallest adjusted p-value is $2.3 \times 10^{-7}$. We therefore reject the hypothesis that local realism governs our experiment.
  • Claude Shannon proved in 1949 that information-theoretic-secure encryption is possible if the encryption key is used only once, is random, and is at least as long as the message itself. Notwithstanding, when information is encoded in a quantum system, the phenomenon of quantum data locking allows one to encrypt a message with a shorter key and still provide information-theoretic security. We present one of the first feasible experimental demonstrations of quantum data locking for direct communication and propose a scheme for a quantum enigma machine that encrypts 6 bits per photon (containing messages, new encryption keys, and forward error correction bits) with less than 6 bits per photon of encryption key while remaining information-theoretically secure.
  • We use quantum detector tomography to investigate the detection mechanism in WSi nanowire superconducting single photon detectors (SSPDs). To this purpose, we fabricated a 250nm wide and 250nm long WSi nanowire and measured its response to impinging photons with wavelengths ranging from $\lambda$ = 900 nm to $\lambda$ = 1650 nm. Tomographic measurements show that the detector response depends on the total excitation energy only. Moreover, for energies Et > 0.8eV the current energy relation is linear, similar to what was observed in NbN nanowires, whereas the current-energy relation deviates from linear behaviour for total energies below 0.8eV.
  • If a photon interacts with a member of an entangled photon pair via a so-called Bell-state measurement (BSM), its state is teleported over principally arbitrary distances onto the second member of the pair. Starting in 1997, this puzzling prediction of quantum mechanics has been demonstrated many times; however, with one very recent exception, only the photon that received the teleported state, if any, travelled far while the photons partaking in the BSM were always measured closely to where they were created. Here, using the Calgary fibre network, we report quantum teleportation from a telecommunication-wavelength photon, interacting with another telecommunication photon after both have travelled over several kilometres in bee-line, onto a photon at 795~nm wavelength. This improves the distance over which teleportation takes place from 818~m to 6.2~km. Our demonstration establishes an important requirement for quantum repeater-based communications and constitutes a milestone on the path to a global quantum Internet.
  • We present a source of polarization entangled photon pairs based on spontaneous parametric downconversion engineered for frequency uncorrelated telecom photon generation. Our source provides photon pairs that display, simultaneously, the key properties for high-performance quantum information and fundamental quantum science tasks. Specifically, the source provides for high heralding efficiency, high quantum state purity and high entangled state fidelity at the same time. Among different tests we apply to our source we observe almost perfect non-classical interference between photons from independent sources with a visibility of $(100\pm5)\%$.
  • Processing and distributing quantum information using photons through fibre-optic or free-space links is essential for building future quantum networks. The scalability needed for such networks can be achieved by employing photonic quantum states that are multiplexed into time and/or frequency, and light-matter interfaces that are able to store and process such states with large time-bandwidth product and multimode capacities. Despite important progress in developing such devices, the demonstration of these capabilities using non-classical light remains challenging. Employing the atomic frequency comb quantum memory protocol in a cryogenically cooled erbium-doped optical fibre, we report the quantum storage of heralded single photons at a telecom-wavelength (1.53 {\mu}m) with a time-bandwidth product approaching 800. Furthermore we demonstrate frequency-multimode storage as well as memory-based spectral-temporal photon manipulation. Notably, our demonstrations rely on fully integrated quantum technologies operating at telecommunication wavelengths, i.e. a fibre-pigtailed nonlinear waveguide for the generation of heralded single photons, an erbium-doped fibre for photon storage and manipulation, and fibre interfaced superconducting nanowire devices for efficient single photon detection. With improved storage efficiency, our light-matter interface may become a useful tool in future quantum networks.
  • Photon-based quantum information processing promises new technologies including optical quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and distributed quantum networks. Polarization-encoded photons at telecommunication wavelengths provide a compelling platform for practical realization of these technologies. However, despite important success towards building elementary components compatible with this platform, including sources of entangled photons, efficient single photon detectors, and on-chip quantum circuits, a missing element has been atomic quantum memory that directly allows for reversible mapping of quantum states encoded in the polarization degree of a telecom-wavelength photon. Here we demonstrate the quantum storage and retrieval of polarization states of heralded single-photons at telecom-wavelength by implementing the atomic frequency comb protocol in an ensemble of erbium atoms doped into an optical fiber. Despite remaining limitations in our proof-of-principle demonstration such as small storage efficiency and storage time, our broadband light-matter interface reveals the potential for use in future quantum information processing.
  • We report entanglement swapping with time-bin entangled photon pairs, each constituted of a 795 nm photon and a 1533 nm photon, that are created via spontaneous parametric down conversion in a non-linear crystal. After projecting the two 1533 nm photons onto a Bell state, entanglement between the two 795 nm photons is verified by means of quantum state tomography. As an important feature, the wavelength and bandwidth of the 795 nm photons is compatible with Tm:LiNbO3-based quantum memories, making our experiment an important step towards the realization of a quantum repeater.
  • Two photons can simultaneously share entanglement between several degrees of freedom such as polarization, energy-time, spatial mode and orbital angular momentum. This resource is known as hyperentanglement, and it has been shown to be an important tool for optical quantum information processing. Here we demonstrate the quantum storage and retrieval of photonic hyperentanglement in a solid-state quantum memory. A pair of photons entangled in polarization and energy-time is generated such that one photon is stored in the quantum memory, while the other photon has a telecommunication wavelength suitable for transmission in optical fibre. We measured violations of a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality for each degree of freedom, independently of the other one, which proves the successful storage and retrieval of the two bits of entanglement shared by the photons. Our scheme is compatible with long-distance quantum communication in optical fibre, and is in particular suitable for linear-optical entanglement purification for quantum repeaters.
  • The realization of a future quantum Internet requires processing and storing quantum information at local nodes, and interconnecting distant nodes using free-space and fibre-optic links. Quantum memories for light are key elements of such quantum networks. However, to date, neither an atomic quantum memory for non-classical states of light operating at a wavelength compatible with standard telecom fibre infrastructure, nor a fibre-based implementation of a quantum memory has been reported. Here we demonstrate the storage and faithful recall of the state of a 1532 nm wavelength photon, entangled with a 795 nm photon, in an ensemble of cryogenically cooled erbium ions doped into a 20 meter-long silicate fibre using a photon-echo quantum memory protocol. Despite its currently limited efficiency and storage time, our broadband light-matter interface brings fibre-based quantum networks one step closer to reality. Furthermore, it facilitates novel tests of light-matter interaction and collective atomic effects in unconventional materials.
  • Non-classical states of light are of fundamental importance for emerging quantum technologies. All optics experiments producing multi-qubit entangled states have until now relied on outcome post-selection, a procedure where only the measurement results corresponding to the desired state are considered. This method severely limits the usefulness of the resulting entangled states. Here, we show the direct production of polarization-entangled photon triplets by cascading two entangled downconversion processes. Detecting the triplets with high efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors allows us to fully characterize them through quantum state tomography. We use our three-photon entangled state to demonstrate the ability to herald Bell states, a task which was not possible with previous three-photon states, and test local realism by violating the Mermin and Svetlichny inequalities. These results represent a significant breakthrough for entangled multi-photon state production by eliminating the constraints of outcome post-selection, providing a novel resource for optical quantum information processing.
  • In quantum teleportation, the state of a single quantum system is disembodied into classical information and purely quantum correlations, to be later reconstructed onto a second system that has never directly interacted with the first one. This counterintuitive phenomenon is a cornerstone of quantum information science due to its essential role in several important tasks such as the long-distance transmission of quantum information using quantum repeaters. In this context, a challenge of paramount importance is the distribution of entanglement between remote nodes, and to use this entanglement as a resource for long-distance light-to-matter quantum teleportation. Here we demonstrate quantum teleportation of the polarization state of a telecom-wavelength photon onto the state of a solid-state quantum memory. Entanglement is established between a rare-earth-ion doped crystal storing a single photon that is polarization-entangled with a flying telecom-wavelength photon. The latter is jointly measured with another flying qubit carrying the polarization state to be teleported, which heralds the teleportation. The fidelity of the polarization state of the photon retrieved from the memory is shown to be greater than the maximum fidelity achievable without entanglement, even when the combined distances travelled by the two flying qubits is 25 km of standard optical fibre. This light-to-matter teleportation channel paves the way towards long-distance implementations of quantum networks with solid-state quantum memories.