• This paper establishes the first performance guarantees for a combinatorial online algorithm that schedules stochastic, nonpreemptive jobs on unrelated machines to minimize the expected total weighted completion time. Prior work on unrelated machine scheduling with stochastic jobs was restricted to the offline case, and required sophisticated linear or convex programming relaxations for the assignment of jobs to machines. The algorithm introduced in this paper is based on a purely combinatorial assignment of jobs to machines, hence it also works online. The performance bounds are of the same order of magnitude as those of earlier work, and depend linearly on an upper bound $\Delta$ on the squared coefficient of variation of the jobs' processing times. They are $4+2\Delta$ when there are no release dates, and $12+6\Delta$ when jobs are released over time. For the special case of deterministic processing times, without and with release times, this paper shows that the same combinatorial greedy algorithm has a competitive ratio of 4 and 6, respectively. As to the technical contribution, the paper shows for the first time how dual fitting techniques can be used for stochastic and nonpreemptive scheduling problems.
  • We study the problem of recovery of matrices that are simultaneously low rank and row and/or column sparse. Such matrices appear in recent applications in cognitive neuroscience, imaging, computer vision, macroeconomics, and genetics. We propose a GDT (Gradient Descent with hard Thresholding) algorithm to efficiently recover matrices with such structure, by minimizing a bi-convex function over a nonconvex set of constraints. We show linear convergence of the iterates obtained by GDT to a region within statistical error of an optimal solution. As an application of our method, we consider multi-task learning problems and show that the statistical error rate obtained by GDT is near optimal compared to minimax rate. Experiments demonstrate competitive performance and much faster running speed compared to existing methods, on both simulations and real data sets.
  • We analyse Join-the-Shortest-Queue in a contemporary scaling regime known as the Non-Degenerate Slowdown regime. Join-the-Shortest-Queue (JSQ) is a classical load balancing policy for queueing systems with multiple parallel servers. Parallel server queueing systems are regularly analysed and dimensioned by diffusion approximations achieved in the Halfin-Whitt scaling regime. However, when jobs must be dispatched to a server upon arrival, we advocate the Non-Degenerate Slowdown regime (NDS) to compare different load-balancing rules. In this paper we identify novel diffusion approximation and timescale separation that provides insights into the performance of JSQ. We calculate the price of irrevocably dispatching jobs to servers and prove this to within 15% (in the NDS regime) of the rules that may manoeuvre jobs between servers. We also compare ours results for the JSQ policy with the NDS approximations of many modern load balancing policies such as Idle-Queue-First and Power-of-$d$-choices policies which act as low information proxies for the JSQ policy. Our analysis leads us to construct new rules that have identical performance to JSQ but require less communication overhead than power-of-2-choices.
  • We consider the problem of estimating the latent structure of a social network based on the observed information diffusion events, or {\it cascades}. Here for a given cascade, we only observe the times of infection for infected nodes but not the source of the infection. Most of the existing work on this problem has focused on estimating a diffusion matrix without any structural assumptions on it. In this paper, we propose a novel model based on the intuition that an information is more likely to propagate among two nodes if they are interested in similar topics which are also prominent in the information content. In particular, our model endows each node with an influence vector (which measures how authoritative the node is on each topic) and a receptivity vector (which measures how susceptible the node is for each topic). We show how this node-topic structure can be estimated from the observed cascades and prove an analytical upper bound on the estimation error. The estimated model can be used to build recommendation systems based on the receptivity vectors, as well as for marketing based on the influence vectors. Experiments on synthetic and real data demonstrate the improved performance and better interpretability of our model compared to existing state-of-the-art methods.
  • LTE evolved Multimedia Broadcast/Multicast Service (eMBMS) is an attractive solution for video delivery to very large groups in crowded venues. However, deployment and management of eMBMS systems is challenging, due to the lack of realtime feedback from the User Equipment (UEs). Therefore, we present the Dynamic Monitoring (DyMo) system for low-overhead feedback collection. DyMo leverages eMBMS for broadcasting Stochastic Group Instructions to all UEs. These instructions indicate the reporting rates as a function of the observed Quality of Service (QoS). This simple feedback mechanism collects very limited QoS reports from the UEs. The reports are used for network optimization, thereby ensuring high QoS to the UEs. We present the design aspects of DyMo and evaluate its performance analytically and via extensive simulations. Specifically, we show that DyMo infers the optimal eMBMS settings with extremely low overhead, while meeting strict QoS requirements under different UE mobility patterns and presence of network component failures. For instance, DyMo can detect the eMBMS Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) experienced by the 0.1% percentile of the UEs with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 0.05% with only 5 to 10 reports per second regardless of the number of UEs.
  • Linear elastic fracture mechanics admit analytic solutions that have low regularity at crack tips. Current numerical methods for partial differential equations (PDEs) of this type suffer from the constraint of such low regularity, and fail to deliver optimal high order rate of convergence. We approach the problem by (i) choosing an artificial interface to enclose the center of the low regularity; and (ii) representing the solution in the interior of artificial interface as unknown linear combination of known modes of low regular solutions. This gives rise to an interface formulation of the original PDE, and the linear combination are represented the interface conditions. By enforcing the smooth component of numerical solution in the interior domain to be approximately zero, a least square problem is obtained for the unknown coefficients. The solution of this least square problem will provide approximate interface conditions for the numerical solution of the PDE in the exterior domain. The potential of our interface formulation is favorably demonstrated by numerical experiments on 1-D and 2-D Poisson equations with low regular solutions. High order numerical solutions of unknown coefficients and PDEs are obtained. This proves the potential of the proposed interface formulation as the theoretical basis for solving linear elastic fracture mechanics problems. We indicate the relations between our interface formulation and domain decomposition methods as well as a regularization strategy for the Poisson-Boltzmann equation with singular charge density.
  • WiFi multicast to very large groups has gained attention as a solution for multimedia delivery in crowded areas. Yet, most recently proposed schemes do not provide performance guarantees and none have been tested at scale. To address the issue of providing high multicast throughput with performance guarantees, we present the design and experimental evaluation of the Multicast Dynamic Rate Adaptation (MuDRA) algorithm. MuDRA balances fast adaptation to channel conditions and stability, which is essential for multimedia applications. MuDRA relies on feedback from some nodes collected via a light-weight protocol and dynamically adjusts the rate adaptation response time. Our experimental evaluation of MuDRA on the ORBIT testbed with over 150 nodes shows that MuDRA outperforms other schemes and supports high throughput multicast flows to hundreds of receivers while meeting quality requirements. MuDRA can support multiple high quality video streams, where 90% of the nodes report excellent or very good video quality.
  • The paper studies approximations and control of a processor sharing (PS) server where the service rate depends on the number of jobs occupying the server. The control of such a system is implemented by imposing a limit on the number of jobs that can share the server concurrently, with the rest of the jobs waiting in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) buffer. A desirable control scheme should strike the right balance between efficiency (operating at a high service rate) and parallelism (preventing small jobs from getting stuck behind large ones). We employ the framework of heavy-traffic diffusion analysis to devise near optimal control heuristics for such a queueing system. However, while the literature on diffusion control of state-dependent queueing systems begins with a sequence of systems and an exogenously defined drift function, we begin with a finite discrete PS server and propose an axiomatic recipe to explicitly construct a sequence of state-dependent PS servers which then yields a drift function. We establish diffusion approximations and use them to obtain insightful and closed-form approximations for the original system under a static concurrency limit control policy. We extend our study to control policies that dynamically adjust the concurrency limit. We provide two novel numerical algorithms to solve the associated diffusion control problem. Our algorithms can be viewed as "average cost" iteration: The first algorithm uses binary-search on the average cost and can find an $\epsilon$-optimal policy in time $O\left( \log^2 \frac{1}{\epsilon} \right)$; the second algorithm uses the Newton-Raphson method for root-finding and requires $O\left( \log \frac{1}{\epsilon} \log\log \frac{1}{\epsilon}\right)$ time. Numerical experiments demonstrate the accuracy of our approximation for choosing optimal or near-optimal static and dynamic concurrency control heuristics.
  • Motivated by the problem of packing Virtual Machines on physical servers in the cloud, we study the problem of one-dimensional online stochastic bin packing. Items with sizes i.i.d. from an unknown distribution with integral support arrive as a stream and must be packed on arrival in bins of size B, also an integer. The size of an item is known when it arrives and the goal is to minimize the waste, defined to be the total unused space in non-empty bins. While there are many heuristics for online stochastic bin packing, all such heuristics are either optimal for only certain classes of item size distributions, or rely on learning the distribution. The state-of-the-art Sum of Squares heuristic (Csirik et al.) obtains sublinear (in number of items seen) waste for distributions where the expected waste for the optimal offline algorithm is sublinear, but has a constant factor larger waste for distributions with linear waste under OPT. Csirik et al. solved this problem by learning the distribution and solving an LP to inject phantom jobs in the arrival stream. We present two distribution-agnostic bin packing heuristics that achieve additive O(sqrt{n}) waste compared to OPT for all distributions. Our algorithms are gradient descent on suitably defined Lagrangian relaxations of the bin packing Linear Program. The first algorithm is very similar to the SS algorithm, but conceptually packs the bins top-down instead of bottom-up. This motivates our second heuristic that uses a different Lagrangian relaxation to pack bins bottom-up. Next, we consider the more general problem of online stochastic bin packing with item departures where the time requirement of an item is only revealed when the item departs. Our algorithms extend as is to the case of item departures. We also briefly revisit the Best Fit heuristic which has not been studied in the scenario of item departures yet.
  • We consider the bipartite matching model of customers and servers introduced by Caldentey, Kaplan, and Weiss (Adv. Appl. Probab., 2009). Customers and servers play symmetrical roles. There is a finite set C resp. S, of customer, resp. server, classes. Time is discrete and at each time step, one customer and one server arrive in the system according to a joint probability measure on CxS, independently of the past. Also, at each time step, pairs of matched customer and server, if they exist, depart from the system. Authorized matchings are given by a fixed bipartite graph. A matching policy is chosen, which decides how to match when there are several possibilities. Customers/servers that cannot be matched are stored in a buffer. The evolution of the model can be described by a discrete time Markov chain. We study its stability under various admissible matching policies including: ML (Match the Longest), MS (Match the Shortest), FIFO (match the oldest), priorities. There exist natural necessary conditions for stability (independent of the matching policy) defining the maximal possible stability region. For some bipartite graphs, we prove that the stability region is indeed maximal for any admissible matching policy. For the ML policy, we prove that the stability region is maximal for any bipartite graph. For the MS and priority policies, we exhibit a bipartite graph with a non-maximal stability region.