• Objective:Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) tomography is aimed at reconstructing maps of the initial pressure rise induced by the absorption of light pulses in tissue. In practice, due to inaccurate assumptions in the forward model, noise and other experimental factors, the images are often afflicted by artifacts, occasionally manifested as negative values. The aim of the work is to develop an inversion method which reduces the occurrence of negative values and improves the quantitative performance of optoacoustic imaging. Methods: We present a novel method for optoacoustic tomography based on an entropy maximization algorithm, which uses logarithmic regularization for attaining non-negative reconstructions. The reconstruction image quality is further improved using structural prior based fluence correction. Results: We report the performance achieved by the entropy maximization scheme on numerical simulation, experimental phantoms and in-vivo samples. Conclusion: The proposed algorithm demonstrates superior reconstruction performance by delivering non-negative pixel values with no visible distortion of anatomical structures. Significance: Our method can enable quantitative optoacoustic imaging, and has the potential to improve pre-clinical and translational imaging applications.
  • Light propagating in tissue attains a spectrum that varies with location due to wavelength-dependent fluence attenuation by tissue optical properties, an effect that causes spectral corruption. Predictions of the spectral variations of light fluence in tissue are challenging since the spatial distribution of optical properties in tissue cannot be resolved in high resolution or with high accuracy by current methods. Spectral corruption has fundamentally limited the quantification accuracy of optical and optoacoustic methods and impeded the long sought-after goal of imaging blood oxygen saturation (sO2) deep in tissues; a critical but still unattainable target for the assessment of oxygenation in physiological processes and disease. We discover a new principle underlying light fluence in tissues, which describes the wavelength dependence of light fluence as an affine function of a few reference base spectra, independently of the specific distribution of tissue optical properties. This finding enables the introduction of a previously undocumented concept termed eigenspectra Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (eMSOT) that can effectively account for wavelength dependent light attenuation without explicit knowledge of the tissue optical properties. We validate eMSOT in more than 2000 simulations and with phantom and animal measurements. We find that eMSOT can quantitatively image tissue sO2 reaching in many occasions a better than 10-fold improved accuracy over conventional spectral optoacoustic methods. Then, we show that eMSOT can spatially resolve sO2 in muscle and tumor; revealing so far unattainable tissue physiology patterns. Last, we related eMSOT readings to cancer hypoxia and found congruence between eMSOT tumor sO2 images and tissue perfusion and hypoxia maps obtained by correlative histological analysis.
  • Non-invasive observation of spatiotemporal neural activity of large neural populations distributed over entire brains is a longstanding goal of neuroscience. We developed a real-time volumetric and multispectral optoacoustic tomography platform for imaging of neural activation deep in scattering brains. The system can record 100 volumetric frames per second across a 200mm3 field of view and spatial resolutions below 70um. Experiments performed in immobilized and freely swimming larvae and in adult zebrafish brains demonstrate, for the first time, the fundamental ability to optoacoustically track neural calcium dynamics in animals labeled with genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP5G, while overcoming the longstanding penetration barrier of optical imaging in scattering brains. The newly developed platform offers unprecedented capabilities for functional whole-brain observations of fast calcium dynamics; in combination with optoacoustics' well-established capacity in resolving vascular hemodynamics, it could open new vistas in the study of neural activity and neurovascular coupling in health and disease.
  • Photocontrol of reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) was used to program optoacoustic signal time courses that were temporally unmixed to increase the proteins contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) in optoacoustic imaging. In this way, two variants of the RSFP Dronpa with very similar optoacoustic spectra could be readily discriminated in the presence of highly absorbing blood. Addition of temporal unmixing to multispectral optoacoustic tomography (tuMSOT) in conjunction with synthetic or genetically controlled photochromic contrast agents and customized photoswitching schedules can increase the performance of multiplexed and high contrast molecular optoacoustic imaging.