• We compare X-ray and weak-lensing masses for four galaxy clusters that comprise the top-ranked shear-selected cluster system in the Deep Lens Survey. The weak-lensing observations of this system, which is associated with A781, are from the Kitt Peak Mayall 4-m telescope, and the X-ray observations are from both Chandra and XMM-Newton. For a faithful comparison of masses, we adopt the same matter density profile for each method, which we choose to be an NFW profile. Since neither the X-ray nor weak-lensing data are deep enough to well constrain both the NFW scale radius and central density, we estimate the scale radius using a fitting function for the concentration derived from cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and an X-ray estimate of the mass assuming isothermality. We keep this scale radius in common for both X-ray and weak-lensing profiles, and fit for the central density, which scales linearly with mass. We find that for three of these clusters, there is agreement between X-ray and weak-lensing NFW central densities, and thus masses. For the other cluster, the X-ray central density is higher than that from weak-lensing by 2 sigma. X-ray images suggest that this cluster may be undergoing a merger with a smaller cluster. This work serves as an additional step towards understanding the possible biases in X-ray and weak-lensing cluster mass estimation methods. Such understanding is vital to efforts to constrain cosmology using X-ray or weak-lensing cluster surveys to trace the growth of structure over cosmic time.
  • The Shear TEsting Programme (STEP) is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of weak lensing measurement, in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. We review sixteen current and emerging shear measurement methods in a common language, and assess their performance by running them (blindly) on simulated images that contain a known shear signal. We determine the common features of algorithms that most successfully recover the input parameters. We achieve previously unattained discriminatory precision in our analysis, via a combination of more extensive simulations, and pairs of galaxy images that have been rotated with respect to each other, thus removing noise from their intrinsic ellipticities. The robustness of our simulation approach is also confirmed by testing the relative calibration of methods on real data. Weak lensing measurement has improved since the first STEP paper. Several methods now consistently achieve better than 2% precision, and are still being developed. However, the simulations can now distinguish all methods from perfect performance. Our main concern continues to be the potential for a multiplicative shear calibration bias: not least because this can not be internally calibrated with real data. We determine which galaxy populations are responsible and, by adjusting the simulated observing conditions, we also investigate the effects of instrumental and atmospheric parameters. We have isolated several previously unrecognised aspects of galaxy shape measurement, in which focussed development could provide further progress towards the sub-percent level of precision desired for future surveys. [ABRIDGED]
  • The Shear TEsting Programme, STEP, is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of all weak lensing measurements in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. In this first STEP paper we present the results of a blind analysis of simulated ground-based observations of relatively simple galaxy morphologies. The most successful methods are shown to achieve percent level accuracy. From the cosmic shear pipelines that have been used to constrain cosmology, we find weak lensing shear measured to an accuracy that is within the statistical errors of current weak lensing analyses, with shear measurements accurate to better than 7%. The dominant source of measurement error is shown to arise from calibration uncertainties where the measured shear is over or under-estimated by a constant multiplicative factor. This is of concern as calibration errors cannot be detected through standard diagnostic tests. The measured calibration errors appear to result from stellar contamination, false object detection, the shear measurement method itself, selection bias and/or the use of biased weights. Additive systematics (false detections of shear) resulting from residual point-spread function anisotropy are, in most cases, reduced to below an equivalent shear of 0.001, an order of magnitude below cosmic shear distortions on the scales probed by current surveys. Our results provide a snapshot view of the accuracy of current ground-based weak lensing methods and a benchmark upon which we can improve. To this end we provide descriptions of each method tested and include details of the eight different implementations of the commonly used Kaiser, Squires and Broadhurst (1995) method (KSB+) to aid the improvement of future KSB+ analyses.
  • We consider cosmological applications of galaxy number density correlations to be inferred from future deep and wide multi-band optical surveys. We mostly focus on very large scales as a probe of possible features in the primordial power spectrum. We find the proposed survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope may be competitive with future all-sky CMB experiments over a broad range of scales. On very large scales the inferred power spectrum is robust to photometric redshift errors, and, given a sufficient number density of galaxies, to angular variations in dust extinction and photometric calibration errors. We also consider other applications, such as constraining dark energy with the two CMB-calibrated standard rulers in the matter power spectrum, and controlling the effect of photometric redshift errors to facilitate the interpretation of cosmic shear data. We find that deep photometric surveys over wide area can provide constraints that are competitive with spectroscopic surveys in small volumes.