• LSST Science Collaborations: Phil Marshall, Timo Anguita, Federica B. Bianco, Eric C. Bellm, Niel Brandt, Will Clarkson, Andy Connolly, Eric Gawiser, Zeljko Ivezic, Lynne Jones, Michelle Lochner, Michael B. Lund, Ashish Mahabal, David Nidever, Knut Olsen, Stephen Ridgway, Jason Rhodes, Ohad Shemmer, David Trilling, Kathy Vivas, Lucianne Walkowicz, Beth Willman, Peter Yoachim, Scott Anderson, Pierre Antilogus, Ruth Angus, Iair Arcavi, Humna Awan, Rahul Biswas, Keaton J. Bell, David Bennett, Chris Britt, Derek Buzasi, Dana I. Casetti-Dinescu, Laura Chomiuk, Chuck Claver, Kem Cook, James Davenport, Victor Debattista, Seth Digel, Zoheyr Doctor, R. E. Firth, Ryan Foley, Wen-fai Fong, Lluis Galbany, Mark Giampapa, John E. Gizis, Melissa L. Graham, Carl Grillmair, Phillipe Gris, Zoltan Haiman, Patrick Hartigan, Suzanne Hawley, Renee Hlozek, Saurabh W. Jha, C. Johns-Krull, Shashi Kanbur, Vassiliki Kalogera, Vinay Kashyap, Vishal Kasliwal, Richard Kessler, Alex Kim, Peter Kurczynski, Ofer Lahav, Michael C. Liu, Alex Malz, Raffaella Margutti, Tom Matheson, Jason D. McEwen, Peregrine McGehee, Soren Meibom, Josh Meyers, Dave Monet, Eric Neilsen, Jeffrey Newman, Matt O'Dowd, Hiranya V. Peiris, Matthew T. Penny, Christina Peters, Radoslaw Poleski, Kara Ponder, Gordon Richards, Jeonghee Rho, David Rubin, Samuel Schmidt, Robert L. Schuhmann, Avi Shporer, Colin Slater, Nathan Smith, Marcelles Soares-Santos, Keivan Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael Strauss, Rachel Street, Christopher Stubbs, Mark Sullivan, Paula Szkody, Virginia Trimble, Tony Tyson, Miguel de Val-Borro, Stefano Valenti, Robert Wagoner, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Bevin Ashley Zauderer
    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is designed to provide an unprecedented optical imaging dataset that will support investigations of our Solar System, Galaxy and Universe, across half the sky and over ten years of repeated observation. However, exactly how the LSST observations will be taken (the observing strategy or "cadence") is not yet finalized. In this dynamically-evolving community white paper, we explore how the detailed performance of the anticipated science investigations is expected to depend on small changes to the LSST observing strategy. Using realistic simulations of the LSST schedule and observation properties, we design and compute diagnostic metrics and Figures of Merit that provide quantitative evaluations of different observing strategies, analyzing their impact on a wide range of proposed science projects. This is work in progress: we are using this white paper to communicate to each other the relative merits of the observing strategy choices that could be made, in an effort to maximize the scientific value of the survey. The investigation of some science cases leads to suggestions for new strategies that could be simulated and potentially adopted. Notably, we find motivation for exploring departures from a spatially uniform annual tiling of the sky: focusing instead on different parts of the survey area in different years in a "rolling cadence" is likely to have significant benefits for a number of time domain and moving object astronomy projects. The communal assembly of a suite of quantified and homogeneously coded metrics is the vital first step towards an automated, systematic, science-based assessment of any given cadence simulation, that will enable the scheduling of the LSST to be as well-informed as possible.
  • Flares we observe on stars in white light, UV or soft X-rays are probably harbingers of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). If we use the Sun as a guide, large stellar flares will dissipate two orders of magnitude less X-ray radiative energy than the kinetic energy in the associated CME. Since coronal emission on active stars appears to be dominated by flare activity, CMEs pose a quandary for understanding the fraction of their energy budget stars can spend on magnetic activity. One answer is magnetic suppression of CMEs, in which the strong large-scale fields of active stars entrap and prevent CMEs unless their free energy exceeds a critical value. The CME-less flaring active region NOAA 2192 presents a possible solar analogue of this. Monster CMEs will still exist, and have the potential to ravage planetary atmospheres.
  • This is the stars chapter of the Kavli workshop report, which resulted from the community-based study of needed US OIR capabilities in the LSST era. The full report, which will include this chapter, is anticipated to be available in Fall 2016. See NOAO website (http://www.noao.edu/meetings/lsst-oir-study/) for more details.
  • The recurrent symbiotic nova V745 Sco exploded on 2014 February 6 and was observed on February 22 and 23 by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Transmission Grating Spectrometers. By that time the supersoft source phase had already ended and Chandra spectra are consistent with emission from a hot, shock-heated circumstellar medium with temperatures exceeding 10^7K. X-ray line profiles are more sharply peaked than expected for a spherically-symmetric blast wave, with a full width at zero intensity of approximately 2400 km/s, a full width at half maximum of 1200 +/- 30 km/s and an average net blueshift of 165 +/- 10 km/s. The red wings of lines are increasingly absorbed toward longer wavelengths by material within the remnant. We conclude that the blast wave was sculpted by an aspherical circumstellar medium in which an equatorial density enhancement plays a role, as in earlier symbiotic nova explosions. Expansion of the dominant X-ray emitting material is aligned close to the plane of the sky and most consistent with an orbit seen close to face-on. Comparison of an analytical blast wave model with the X-ray spectra, Swift observations and near-infrared line widths indicates the explosion energy was approximately 10^43 erg, and confirms an ejected mass of approximately 10^-7 Msun. The total mass lost is an order of magnitude lower than the accreted mass required to have initiated the explosion, indicating the white dwarf is gaining mass and is a supernova Type 1a progenitor candidate.
  • We present the results of the first strong lens time delay challenge. The motivation, experimental design, and entry level challenge are described in a companion paper. This paper presents the main challenge, TDC1, which consisted of analyzing thousands of simulated light curves blindly. The observational properties of the light curves cover the range in quality obtained for current targeted efforts (e.g.,~COSMOGRAIL) and expected from future synoptic surveys (e.g.,~LSST), and include simulated systematic errors. \nteamsA\ teams participated in TDC1, submitting results from \nmethods\ different method variants. After a describing each method, we compute and analyze basic statistics measuring accuracy (or bias) $A$, goodness of fit $\chi^2$, precision $P$, and success rate $f$. For some methods we identify outliers as an important issue. Other methods show that outliers can be controlled via visual inspection or conservative quality control. Several methods are competitive, i.e., give $|A|<0.03$, $P<0.03$, and $\chi^2<1.5$, with some of the methods already reaching sub-percent accuracy. The fraction of light curves yielding a time delay measurement is typically in the range $f = $20--40\%. It depends strongly on the quality of the data: COSMOGRAIL-quality cadence and light curve lengths yield significantly higher $f$ than does sparser sampling. Taking the results of TDC1 at face value, we estimate that LSST should provide around 400 robust time-delay measurements, each with $P<0.03$ and $|A|<0.01$, comparable to current lens modeling uncertainties. In terms of observing strategies, we find that $A$ and $f$ depend mostly on season length, while P depends mostly on cadence and campaign duration.
  • The nature of the mechanisms apparently driving X-rays from intermediate mass stars lacking strong convection zones or massive winds remains poorly understood, and the possible role of hidden, lower mass close companions is still unclear. A 20ks Chandra HRC-I observation of HR 4796A, an 8 Myr old main sequence A0 star devoid of close stellar companions, has been used to search for a signature or remnant of magnetic activity from the Herbig Ae phase. X-rays were not detected and the X-ray luminosity upper limit was L_X =< 1.3x10^27 erg/s. The result is discussed in the context of various scenarios for generating magnetic activity, including rotational shear and subsurface convection. A dynamo driven by natal differential rotation is unlikely to produce observable X rays, chiefly because of the difficulty in getting the dissipated energy up to the surface of the star. A subsurface convection layer produced by the ionisation of helium could host a dynamo that should be effective throughout the main-sequence but can only produce X-ray luminosities of order 10^25 erg/s. This luminosity lies only moderately below the current detection limit for Vega. Our study supports the idea that X-ray production in Herbig Ae/Be stars is linked largely to the accretion process rather than the properties of the underlying star, and that early A stars generally decline in X-ray luminosity at least 100,000 fold in only a few million years.
  • Extensive X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photometric observations of the eclipsing RS CVn system AR Lac were obtained over the years 1997 to 2013 with the Chandra X-ray Observatory Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer. During primary eclipse, HRC count rates decrease by ~40%. A similar minimum is seen during one primary eclipse observed by EUVE but not in others owing to intrinsic source variability. Little evidence for secondary eclipses is present in either the X-ray or EUV data, reminiscent of earlier X-ray and EUV observations. Primary eclipses allow us to estimate the extent of a spherically symmetric corona on the primary G star of about 1.3Rsun, or 0.86Rstar, and indicate the G star is likely brighter than the K component by a factor of 2-5. Brightness changes not attributable to eclipses appear to be dominated by stochastic variability and are generally non-repeating. X-ray and EUV light curves cannot therefore be reliably used to reconstruct the spatial distribution of emission assuming only eclipses and rotational modulation are at work. Moderate flaring is observed, where count rates increase by up to a factor of three above quiescence. Combined with older ASCA, Einstein, EXOSAT, ROSAT and Beppo-SAX observations, the data show that the level of quiescent coronal emission at X-ray wavelengths has remained remarkably constant over 33 years, with no sign of variation due to magnetic cycles. Variations in base level X-ray emission seen by Chandra over 13 years are only ~10%, while variations back to pioneering Einstein observations in 1980 amount to a maximum of 45% and more typically about 15%.
  • This article offers a short guide to the steps scientists can take to ensure that their data and associated analyses continue to be of value and to be recognized. In just the past few years, hundreds of scholarly papers and reports have been written on questions of data sharing, data provenance, research reproducibility, licensing, attribution, privacy, and more, but our goal here is not to review that literature. Instead, we present a short guide intended for researchers who want to know why it is important to "care for and feed" data, with some practical advice on how to do that.
  • An XMM-Newton observation of the nearby "pre-cataclysmic" short-period (P_orb = 3.62 hr) binary QS Vir (EC 13471-1258) revealed regular narrow X-ray eclipses when the white dwarf passed behind its M2-4 dwarf companion. The X-ray emission provides a clear signature of mass transfer and accretion onto the white dwarf. The low-resolution XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are consistent with a cooling flow model and indicate an accretion rate of Mdot= 1.7\times10^-13M\odot/yr. At 48 pc distant, QS Vir is then the second nearest accreting cataclysmic variable known, with one of the lowest accretion rates found to date for a non-magnetic system. To feed this accretion through a wind would require a wind mass loss rate of Mdot ~ 2 \times 10^-12M\odot/yr if the accretion efficiency is of the order of 10%. Consideration of likely mass loss rates for M dwarfs suggests this is improbably high and pure wind accretion unlikely. A lack of accretion disk signatures also presents some difficulties for direct Roche lobe overflow. We speculate that QS Vir is on the verge of Roche lobe overflow, and that the observed mass transfer could be supplemented by upward chromospheric flows on the M dwarf, analogous to spicules and mottles on the Sun, that escape the Roche surface to be subsequently swept up into the white dwarf Roche lobe. If so, QS Vir would be in a rare evolutionary phase lasting only a million years. The X-ray luminosity of the M dwarf estimated during primary eclipse is L_X = 3 \times 10^28 erg/s, which is consistent with that of rapidly rotating "saturated" K and M dwarfs.
  • The frequency of heating events in the corona is an important constraint on the coronal heating mechanisms. Observations indicate that the intensities and velocities measured in active region cores are effectively steady, suggesting that heating events occur rapidly enough to keep high temperature active region loops close to equilibrium. In this paper, we couple observations of Active Region 10955 made with XRT and EIS on \textit{Hinode} to test a simple steady heating model. First we calculate the differential emission measure of the apex region of the loops in the active region core. We find the DEM to be broad and peaked around 3\,MK. We then determine the densities in the corresponding footpoint regions. Using potential field extrapolations to approximate the loop lengths and the density-sensitive line ratios to infer the magnitude of the heating, we build a steady heating model for the active region core and find that we can match the general properties of the observed DEM for the temperature range of 6.3 $<$ Log T $<$ 6.7. This model, for the first time, accounts for the base pressure, loop length, and distribution of apex temperatures of the core loops. We find that the density-sensitive spectral line intensities and the bulk of the hot emission in the active region core are consistent with steady heating. We also find, however, that the steady heating model cannot address the emission observed at lower temperatures. This emission may be due to foreground or background structures, or may indicate that the heating in the core is more complicated. Different heating scenarios must be tested to determine if they have the same level of agreement.
  • The Chandra Multiwavength Plane (ChaMPlane) Survey of the galactic plane incorporates serendipitous sources from selected Chandra pointings in or near the galactic plane (b < 12deg; >20 ksec; lack of bright diffuse or point sources) to measure or constrain the luminosity function of low-luminosity accretion sources in the Galaxy. The primary goal is to detect and identify accreting white dwarfs (cataclysmic variables, with space density still uncertain by a factor of >10-100), neutron stars and black holes (quiescent low mass X-ray binaries) to constrain their space densities and thus origin and evolution. Secondary objectives are to identify Be stars in high mass X-ray binaries and constrain their space densities, and to survey the H-R diagram for stellar coronal sources. A parallel optical imaging under the NOAO Long Term Survey program provides deep optical images using the Mosaic imager on the CTIO and KPNO 4-m telescopes. The 36arcmin X 36arcmin optical images (Halpha, R, V and I) cover ~5X the area of each enclosed Chandra ACIS FOV, providing an extended survey of emission line objects for comparison with Chandra. Spectroscopic followup of optical counterparts is then conducted, thus far with WIYN and Magellan. The X-ray preliminary results from both the Chandra and optical surveys will be presented, including logN-logS vs. galactic position (l,b) and optical idenifications.
  • We investigate the contribution of very weak flares to the coronal luminosity of low-mass active stars. We analyze EUVE/DS events data from FK Aqr, V1054 Oph, and AD Leo and conclude that in all these cases the coronal emission is dominated by flares to such an extent that in some cases the entire emission may be ascribed to flare heating. We have developed a new method to directly model for the first time stochastically produced flare emission, including undetectable flares, and their effects on the observed photon arrival times. We find that the index of the power-law distribution of flare energies (dN/dE ~ E^{-alpha}) is 2.6+-0.34, 2.74+-0.35, and 2.03-2.32 for FK Aqr, V1054 Oph, and AD Leo respectively. We also find that the flare component accounts for a large fraction (generally >50 percent) of the total flux.
  • Wavelets are scaleable, oscillatory functions that deviate from zero only within a limited spatial regime and have average value zero. In addition to their use as source characterizers, wavelet functions are rapidly gaining currency within the source detection field. Wavelet-based source detection involves the correlation of scaled wavelet functions with binned, two-dimensional image data. If the chosen wavelet function exhibits the property of vanishing moments, significantly non-zero correlation coefficients will be observed only where there are high-order variations in the data; e.g., they will be observed in the vicinity of sources. In this paper, we describe the mission-independent, wavelet-based source detection algorithm WAVDETECT, part of the CIAO software package. Aspects of our algorithm include: (1) the computation of local, exposure-corrected normalized (i.e. flat-fielded) background maps; (2) the correction for exposure variations within the field-of-view; (3) its applicability within the low-counts regime, as it does not require a minimum number of background counts per pixel for the accurate computation of source detection thresholds; (4) the generation of a source list in a manner that does not depend upon a detailed knowledge of the point spread function (PSF) shape; and (5) error analysis. These features make our algorithm considerably more general than previous methods developed for the analysis of X-ray image data, especially in the low count regime. We demonstrate the algorithm's robustness by applying it to various images.
  • We compare the count-rates of active binaries observed by Einstein and ROSAT. We find significant evidence for short-term variability (approx 0.32) and marginal evidence for a larger variability at longer timescales (approx 0.38). Modeling this excess as cyclic variability, we place an upper limit on the relative amplitude of the cyclic component (I_cyc/I_min < 4) for active binaries, significantly less than the variations seen in the Solar X-ray output over the Solar cycle.