• Context. Differential rotation has a strong influence on stellar internal dynamics and evolution, notably by triggering hydrodynamical instabilities, by interacting with the magnetic field, and more generally by inducing transport of angular momentum and chemical elements. Moreover, it modifies the way waves propagate in stellar interiors and thus the frequency spectrum of these waves, the regions they probe, and the transport they generate. Aims. We investigate the impact of a general differential rotation (both in radius and latitude) on the propagation of axisymmetric gravito-inertial waves. Methods. We use a small-wavelength approximation to obtain a local dispersion relation for these waves. We then describe the propagation of waves thanks to a ray model that follows a Hamiltonian formalism. Finally, we numerically probe the properties of these gravito-inertial rays for different regimes of radial and latitudinal differential rotation. Results. We derive a local dispersion relation that includes the effect of a general differential rotation. Subsequently, considering a polytropic stellar model, we observe that differential rotation allows for a large variety of resonant cavities that can be probed by gravito-inertial waves. We identify that for some regimes of frequency and differential rotation, the properties of gravito-inertial rays are similar to those found in the uniformly rotating case. Furthermore, we also find new regimes specific to differential rotation, where the dynamics of rays is chaotic. Conclusions. As a consequence, we expect modes to follow the same trend. Some parts of oscillation spectra corresponding to regimes similar to those of the uniformly rotating case would exhibit regular patterns, while parts corresponding to the new regimes would be mostly constituted of chaotic modes with a spectrum rather characterised by a generic statistical distribution.
  • Context. As of today, asteroseismology mainly allows us to probe the internal rotation of stars when modes are only weakly affected by rotation using perturbative methods. Such methods cannot be applied to rapidly rotating stars, which exhibit complex oscillation spectra. In this context, the so-called traditional approximation, which neglects the terms associated with the latitudinal component of the rotation vector, describes modes that are strongly affected by rotation. This approximation is sometimes used for interpreting asteroseismic data, however, its domain of validity is not established yet. Aims. We aim at deriving analytical prescriptions for period spacings of low-frequency gravity modes strongly affected by rotation through the full Coriolis acceleration, which can be used to probe stellar internal structure and rotation. Methods. We approximated the asymptotic theory of gravito-inertial waves in uniformly rotating stars using ray theory described in a previous paper in the low-frequency regime, where waves are trapped near the equatorial plane. We put the equations of ray dynamics into a separable form and used the EBK quantisation method to compute modes frequencies from rays. Results. Two spectral patterns that depend on stratification and rotation are predicted within this new approximation: one for axisymmetric modes and one for non-axisymmetric modes. Conclusions. The detection of the predicted patterns in observed oscillation spectra would give constraints on internal rotation and chemical stratification of rapidly rotating stars exhibiting gravity modes, such as $\gamma$ Doradus, SPB, or Be stars. The obtained results have a mathematical form that is similar to that of the traditional approximation, but the new approximation takes the full Coriolis, which allows for propagation near the centre, and centrifugal accelerations into account.
  • Most of the information we have about the internal rotation of stars comes from modes that are weakly affected by rotation, for example by using rotational splittings. In contrast, we present here a method, based on the asymptotic theory of Prat et al. (2016), which allows us to analyse the signature of rotation where its effect is the most important, that is in low-frequency gravity modes that are strongly affected by rotation. For such modes, we predict two spectral patterns that could be confronted to observed spectra and those computed using fully two-dimensional oscillation codes.
  • Recent numerical simulations suggest that the model by Zahn (1992, A&A, 265, 115) for the turbulent mixing of chemical elements due to differential rotation in stellar radiative zones is valid. We investigate the robustness of this result with respect to the numerical configuration and Reynolds number of the flow. We compare results from simulations performed with two different numerical codes, including one that uses the shearing-box formalism. We also extensively study the dependence of the turbulent diffusion coefficient on the turbulent Reynolds number. The two numerical codes used in this study give consistent results. The turbulent diffusion coefficient is independent of the size of the numerical domain if at least three large turbulent structures fit in the box. Generally, the turbulent diffusion coefficient depends on the turbulent Reynolds number. However, our simulations suggest that an asymptotic regime is obtained when the turbulent Reynolds number is larger than $10^3$. Shear mixing in the regime of small P\'eclet numbers can be investigated numerically both with shearing-box simulations and simulations using explicit forcing. Our results suggest that Zahn's model is valid at large turbulent Reynolds numbers.
  • Recently Pasetto et al. have proposed a new method to derive a convection theory appropriate for the implementation in stellar evolution codes. Their approach is based on the simple physical picture of spherical bubbles moving within a potential flow in dynamically unstable regions, and a detailed computation of the bubble dynamics. Based on this approach the authors derive a new theory of convection which is claimed to be parameter free, non-local and time-dependent. This is a very strong claim, as such a theory is the holy grail of stellar physics. Unfortunately we have identified several distinct problems in the derivation which ultimately render their theory inapplicable to any physical regime. In addition we show that the framework of spherical bubbles in potential flows is unable to capture the essence of stellar convection, even when equations are derived correctly.
  • Context. The seismology of early-type stars is limited by our incomplete understanding of gravito-inertial modes. Aims. We develop a short-wavelength asymptotic analysis for gravito-inertial modes in rotating stars. Methods. The Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation was applied to the equations governing adiabatic small perturbations about a model of a uniformly rotating barotropic star. Results. A general eikonal equation, including the effect of the centrifugal deformation, is derived. The dynamics of axisymmetric gravito-inertial rays is solved numerically for polytropic stellar models of increasing rotation and analysed by describing the structure of the phase space. Three different types of phase-space structures are distinguished. The first type results from the continuous evolution of structures of the non-rotating integrable phase space. It is predominant in the low-frequency part of the phase space. The second type of structures are island chains associated with stable periodic rays. The third type of structures are large chaotic regions that can be related to the envelope minimum of the Brunt-V\"ais\"al\"a frequency. Conclusions. Gravito-inertial modes are expected to follow this classification, in which the frequency spectrum is a superposition of sub-spectra associated with these different types of phase-space structures. The detailed confrontation between the predictions of this ray-based asymptotic theory and numerically computed modes will be presented in a companion paper.
  • Several parametrizations for overshooting in 1D stellar evolution calculations coexist in the literature. These parametrizations are used somewhat arbitrarily in stellar evolution codes, based on what works best for a given problem, or even for historical reasons related to the development of each code. We bring attention to the fact that these different parametrizations correspond to different physical regimes of overshooting, depending whether the effects of radiation are dominant, marginal, or negligible. Our analysis is based on previously published theoretical results, as well as multidimensional hydrodynamical simulations of stellar convection where the interaction between the convective region and a stably-stratified region is observed. Although the underlying hydrodynamical processes are the same, the outcome of the overshooting process is profoundly affected by radiative effects. Using a simple picture of the scales involved in the overshooting process, we show how three regimes are obtained, depending on the importance of radiative effects. These three regimes correspond to the different behaviors observed in hydrodynamical simulations so far, and to the three types of parametrizations used in 1D codes. We suggest that the existing parametrizations for overshooting should coexist in 1D stellar evolution codes, and should be applied consistently at convective boundaries depending on the local physical conditions.
  • Turbulent transport of chemical elements in radiative zones of stars is considered in current stellar evolution codes thanks to phenomenologically derived diffusion coefficients. Recent local numerical simulations (Prat & Ligni\`eres 2013, A&A, 551, L3) suggest that the coefficient for radial turbulent diffusion due to radial differential rotation satisfies $D_{\rm t}\simeq0.058\kappa/Ri$, in qualitative agreement with Zahn's model. However, this model does not apply when differential rotation is strong with respect to stable thermal stratification or when chemical stratification has a significant dynamical effect, a situation encountered at the outer boundary of nuclear-burning convective cores. We extend our numerical study to consider the effects of chemical stratification and of strong shear, and compare the results with prescriptions used in stellar evolution codes. We performed local, direct numerical simulations of stably stratified, homogeneous, sheared turbulence in the Boussinesq approximation. The regime of high thermal diffusivities, typical of stellar radiative zones, is reached thanks to the so-called small-P\'eclet-number approximation, which is an asymptotic development of the Boussinesq equations in this regime. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on chemical stratification was explored in this approximation. Maeder's extension of Zahn's model in the strong-shear regime is not supported by our results, which are better described by a model found in the geophysical literature. As regards the effect of chemical stratification, our quantitative estimate of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the mean gradient of mean molecular weight leads to the formula $D_{\rm t}\simeq 0.45\kappa(0.12-Ri_\mu)/Ri$, which is compatible in the weak-shear regime with the model of Maeder & Meynet (1996, A&A, 313, 140).
  • Context. In stellar interiors, rotation is able to drive turbulent motions, and the related transport processes have a significant influence on the evolution of stars. Turbulent mixing in the radiative zones is currently taken into account in stellar evolution models through a set of diffusion coefficients that are generally poorly constrained. Aims. We want to constrain the form of one of them, the radial diffusion coefficient of chemical elements due to the turbulence driven by radial differential rotation, derived by Zahn (1974, 1992) on phenomenological grounds and largely used since. Methods. We performed local, direct numerical simulations of stably stratified homogeneous sheared turbulence using the Boussinesq approximation. The domain of low P\'eclet numbers found in stellar interiors is currently inaccessible to numerical simulations without approximation. It is explored here thanks to a suitable asymptotic form of the Boussinesq equations. The turbulent transport of a passive scalar is determined in statistical steady states. Results. We provide a first quantitative determination of the turbulent diffusion coefficient and find that the form proposed by Zahn is in good agreement with the results of the numerical simulations.