• We use HST observations from the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey to reconstruct the recent star formation histories (SFHs) of three actively star-forming dwarf galaxies, NGC4449, Holmberg II and NGC1705, from their UV color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). We apply a CMD fitting technique using two independent sets of stellar isochrones, PARSEC-COLIBRI and MIST, to assess the uncertainties related to stellar evolution modelling. Irrespective of the adopted stellar models, all the three dwarfs are found to have had almost constant star formation rates (SFRs) in the last 100-200 Myr, with modest enhancements (a factor of $\sim$2) above the 100 Myr-averaged-SFR. Significant differences among the three dwarfs are found in the overall SFR, the timing of the most recent peak and the SFR$/$area. The Initial Mass Function (IMF) of NGC1705 and Holmberg II is consistent with a Salpeter slope down to $\approx$ 5 M$_{\odot}$, whereas it is slightly flatter, s$=-2.0$, in NGC4449. The SFHs derived with the two different sets of stellar models are consistent with each other, except for some quantitative details, attributable to their input assumptions. They also share the drawback that all synthetic diagrams predict a clear separation in color between upper main sequence and helium burning stars, which is not apparent in the data. Since differential reddening, significant in NGC4449, or unresolved binaries don't appear to be sufficient to fill the gap, we suggest this calls for a revision of both sets of stellar evolutionary tracks.
  • We present optical lightcurves of variable stars consistent with the positions of X-ray sources identified with the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey. Using data from the Mosaic-II instrument on the Blanco 4m Telescope at CTIO, we gathered time-resolved photometric data on timescales from $\sim2$ hr to 8 days over the $\frac{3}{4}$ of the X-ray survey containing sources from the initial GBS catalog. Among the lightcurve morphologies we identify are flickering in interacting binaries, eclipsing sources, dwarf nova outbursts, ellipsoidal variations, long period variables, spotted stars, and flare stars. $87\%$ of X-ray sources have at least one potential optical counterpart. $24\%$ of these candidate counterparts are detectably variable; a much greater fraction than expected for randomly selected field stars, which suggests that most of these variables are real counterparts. We discuss individual sources of interest, provide variability information on candidate counterparts, and discuss the characteristics of the variable population.
  • We study the spectral energy distributions and evolution of a large sample of optically selected quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that were observed in 323 Chandra images analyzed by the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP). Our highest-confidence matched sample includes 1135 X-ray detected quasars in the redshift range 0.2<z<5.4, representing some 36Msec of effective exposure. Spectroscopic redshifts are available for about 1/3 of the detected sample; elsewhere, redshifts are estimated photometrically. With 56 z>3 QSOs detected, we find no evidence for evolution out to z~5 for either the X-ray photon index Gamma or for the ratio of optical/UV to X-ray flux alpha_ox. About 10% of detected QSOs are obscured (Nh>1E22), but the fraction might reach ~1/3 if most non-detections are absorbed. We confirm a significant correlation between alpha_ox and optical luminosity, but it flattens or disappears for fainter AGN alone. Gamma hardens significantly both towards higher X-ray luminosity, and for relatively X-ray loud quasars. These trends may represent a relative increase in non-thermal X-ray emission, and our findings thereby strengthen analogies between Galactic black hole binaries and AGN.
  • We present 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, and 70 micron images of the Crab Nebula obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC and MIPS cameras, Low- and High-resolution Spitzer IRS spectra of selected positions within the nebula, and a near-infrared ground-based image made in the light of [Fe II]1.644 micron. The 8.0 micron image, made with a bandpass that includes [Ar II]7.0 micron, resembles the general morphology of visible H-alpha and near-IR [Fe II] line emission, while the 3.6 and 4.5 micron images are dominated by continuum synchrotron emission. The 24 micron and 70 micron images show enhanced emission that may be due to line emission or the presence of a small amount of warm dust in the nebula on the order of less than 1% of a solar mass. The ratio of the 3.6 and 4.5 micron images reveals a spatial variation in the synchrotron power law index ranging from approximately 0.3 to 0.8 across the nebula. Combining this information with optical and X-ray synchrotron images, we derive a broadband spectrum that reflects the superposition of the flatter spectrum jet and torus with the steeper diffuse nebula, and suggestions of the expected pileup of relativistic electrons just before the exponential cutoff in the X-ray. The pulsar, and the associated equatorial toroid and polar jet structures seen in Chandra and HST images (Hester et al. 2002) can be identified in all of the IRAC images. We present the IR photometry of the pulsar. The forbidden lines identified in the high resolution IR spectra are all double due to Doppler shifts from the front and back of the expanding nebula and give an expansion velocity of approximately 1264 km/s.