• This paper presents a methodology for simulating the Internet of Things (IoT) using multi-level simulation models. With respect to conventional simulators, this approach allows us to tune the level of detail of different parts of the model without compromising the scalability of the simulation. As a use case, we have developed a two-level simulator to study the deployment of smart services over rural territories. The higher level is base on a coarse grained, agent-based adaptive parallel and distributed simulator. When needed, this simulator spawns OMNeT++ model instances to evaluate in more detail the issues concerned with wireless communications in restricted areas of the simulated world. The performance evaluation confirms the viability of multi-level simulations for IoT environments.
  • This paper deals with the use of hybrid simulation to build and compose heterogeneous simulation scenarios that can be proficiently exploited to model and represent the Internet of Things (IoT). Hybrid simulation is a methodology that combines multiple modalities of modeling/simulation. Complex scenarios are decomposed into simpler ones, each one being simulated through a specific simulation strategy. All these simulation building blocks are then synchronized and coordinated. This simulation methodology is an ideal one to represent IoT setups, which are usually very demanding, due to the heterogeneity of possible scenarios arising from the massive deployment of an enormous amount of sensors and devices. We present a use case concerned with the distributed simulation of smart territories, a novel view of decentralized geographical spaces that, thanks to the use of IoT, builds ICT services to manage resources in a way that is sustainable and not harmful to the environment. Three different simulation models are combined together, namely, an adaptive agent-based parallel and distributed simulator, an OMNeT++ based discrete event simulator and a script-language simulator based on MATLAB. Results from a performance analysis confirm the viability of using hybrid simulation to model complex IoT scenarios.
  • This paper deals with the problem of properly simulating the Internet of Things (IoT). Simulating an IoT allows evaluating strategies that can be employed to deploy smart services over different kinds of territories. However, the heterogeneity of scenarios seriously complicates this task. This imposes the use of sophisticated modeling and simulation techniques. We discuss novel approaches for the provision of scalable simulation scenarios, that enable the real-time execution of massively populated IoT environments. Attention is given to novel hybrid and multi-level simulation techniques that, when combined with agent-based, adaptive Parallel and Distributed Simulation (PADS) approaches, can provide means to perform highly detailed simulations on demand. To support this claim, we detail a use case concerned with the simulation of vehicular transportation systems.
  • In this paper, a methodology is presented and employed for simulating the Internet of Things (IoT). The requirement for scalability, due to the possibly huge amount of involved sensors and devices, and the heterogeneous scenarios that might occur, impose resorting to sophisticated modeling and simulation techniques. In particular, multi-level simulation is regarded as a main framework that allows simulating large-scale IoT environments while keeping high levels of detail, when it is needed. We consider a use case based on the deployment of smart services in decentralized territories. A two level simulator is employed, which is based on a coarse agent-based, adaptive parallel and distributed simulation approach to model the general life of simulated entities. However, when needed a finer grained simulator (based on OMNeT++) is triggered on a restricted portion of the simulated area, which allows considering all issues concerned with wireless communications. Based on this use case, it is confirmed that the ad-hoc wireless networking technologies do represent a principle tool to deploy smart services over decentralized countrysides. Moreover, the performance evaluation confirms the viability of utilizing multi-level simulation for simulating large scale IoT environments.
  • This paper presents main concepts and issues concerned with the simulation of Internet of Things (IoT). The heterogeneity of possible scenarios, arising from the massive deployment of an enormous amount of sensors and devices, imposes the use of sophisticated modeling and simulation techniques. In fact, the simulation of IoT introduces several issues from both quantitative and qualitative aspects. We discuss novel simulation techniques to enhance scalability and to permit the real-time execution of massively populated IoT environments (e.g., large-scale smart cities). In particular, we claim that agent-based, adaptive Parallel and Distributed Simulation (PADS) approaches are needed, together with multi-level simulation, which provide means to perform highly detailed simulations, on demand. We present a use case concerned with the simulation of smart territories.
  • This paper discusses on the need to focus on effective and cheap communication solutions for the deployment of smart services in countrysides. We present the main wireless technologies, software architectures and protocols that need to be exploited, such as multihop, multipath communication and mobility support through multihoming. We present Always Best Packet Switching (ABPS), an operation mode to perform network handover in a seamless way without the need to change the current network infrastructure and configuration. This is in accordance with the need of having cheap solutions that may work in a smart shire scenario. A simulation assessment confirms the effectiveness of our approach.
  • This work presents a comprehensive and structured taxonomy of available techniques for managing the handover process in mobility architectures. Representative works from the existing literature have been divided into appropriate categories, based on their ability to support horizontal handovers, vertical handovers and multihoming. We describe approaches designed to work on the current Internet (i.e. IPv4-based networks), as well as those that have been devised for the "future" Internet (e.g. IPv6-based networks and extensions). Quantitative measures and qualitative indicators are also presented and used to evaluate and compare the examined approaches. This critical review provides some valuable guidelines and suggestions for designing and developing mobility architectures, including some practical expedients (e.g. those required in the current Internet environment), aimed to cope with the presence of NAT/firewalls and to provide support to legacy systems and several communication protocols working at the application layer.
  • In this paper we argue that the set of wireless, mobile devices (e.g., portable telephones, tablet PCs, GPS navigators, media players) commonly used by human users enables the construction of what we term a digital ecosystem, i.e., an ecosystem constructed out of so-called digital organisms (see below), that can foster the development of novel distributed services. In this context, a human user equipped with his/her own mobile devices, can be though of as a digital organism (DO), a subsystem characterized by a set of peculiar features and resources it can offer to the rest of the ecosystem for use from its peer DOs. The internal organization of the DO must address issues of management of its own resources, including power consumption. Inside the DO and among DOs, peer-to-peer interaction mechanisms can be conveniently deployed to favor resource sharing and data dissemination. Throughout this paper, we show that most of the solutions and technologies needed to construct a digital ecosystem are already available. What is still missing is a framework (i.e., mechanisms, protocols, services) that can support effectively the integration and cooperation of these technologies. In addition, in the following we show that that framework can be implemented as a middleware subsystem that enables novel and ubiquitous forms of computation and communication. Finally, in order to illustrate the effectiveness of our approach, we introduce some experimental results we have obtained from preliminary implementations of (parts of) that subsystem.
  • Always Best Packet Switching (ABPS) is a novel approach for wireless communications that enables mobile nodes, equipped with multiple network interface cards (NICs), to dynamically determine the most appropriate NIC to use. Using ABPS, a mobile node can seamlessly switch to a different NIC in order to get better performance, without causing communication interruptions at the application level. To make this possible, NICs are kept always active and a software monitor constantly probes the channels for available access points. While this ensures maximum connection availability, considerable energy may be wasted when no access points are available for a given NIC. In this paper we address this issue by investigating the use of an "oracle" able to provide information on network availability. This allows to dynamically switch on/off NICs based on reported availability, thus reducing the power consumption. We present a Markov model which allows us to estimate the impact of the oracle on the ABPS mechanism: results show that significant reduction in energy consumption can be achieved with minimal impact on connection availability. We conclude by describing a prototype implementation of the oracle based on Web services and geolocalization.
  • This paper presents a mitigation scheme to cope with the random query string Denial of Service (DoS) attack, which is based on a vulnerability of current Content Delivery Networks (CDNs). The attack exploits the fact that edge servers composing a CDN, receiving an HTTP request for a resource with an appended random query string never saw before, ask the origin server for a (novel) copy of the resource. Such characteristics can be employed to take an attack against the origin server by exploiting edge servers. Our strategy adopts a simple gossip protocol executed by edge servers to detect the attack. Based on such a detection, countermeasures can be taken to protect the origin server and the CDN against the attack. We provide simulation results that show the viability of our approach.
  • The coupling of scale-free networks with mobile unstructured networks is certainly unusual. In mobile networks, connections active at a given instant are constrained by the geographical distribution of mobile nodes, and by the limited signal strength of the wireless technology employed to build the ad-hoc overlay. This is in contrast with the presence of hubs, typical of scale-free nets. However, opportunistic (mobile) networks possess the distinctive feature to be delay tolerant; mobile nodes implement a store, carry and forward strategy that permits to disseminate data based on a multi-hop route, which is built in time, when nodes encounter other ones while moving. In this paper, we consider opportunistic networks as evolving graphs where links represent contacts among nodes arising during a (non-instantaneous) time interval. We discuss a strategy to control the way nodes manage contacts and build "opportunistic overlays". Based on such an approach, interesting overlays can be obtained, shaped following given desired topologies, such as scale-free ones.