• Soft-X-ray ARPES (SX-ARPES) with its enhanced probing depth and chemical specificity allows access to fundamental electronic structure characteristics - momentum-resolved spectral function, band structure, Fermi surface - of systems difficult and even impossible for the conventional ARPES such as three-dimensional materials, buried interfaces and impurities. After a recap of the spectroscopic abilities of SX-ARPES, we review its applications to oxide interfaces, focusing on the paradigm LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. Resonant SX-ARPES at the Ti L-edge accentuates photoemission response of the mobile interface electrons and exposes their dxy-, dyz- and dxz-derived subbands forming the Fermi surface in the interface quantum well. After a recap of the electron-phonon interaction physics, we demonstrate that peak-dip-hump structure of the experimental spectral function manifests the Holstein-type large polaron nature of the interface charge carriers, explaining their fundamentally reduced mobility. Coupling of the charge carriers to polar soft phonon modes defines dramatic drop of mobility with temperature. Oxygen deficiency adds another dimension to the rich physics of LaAlO3-SrTiO3 resulting from co-existence of mobile and localized electrons introduced by oxygen vacancies. Oxygen deficiency allows tuning of the polaronic coupling and thus mobility of the charge carriers, as well as of interfacial ferromagnetism connected with various atomic configurations of the vacancies. Finally, we discuss spectroscopic evidence of phase separation at the LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. Concluding, we put prospects of SX-ARPES for complex heterostructures, spin-resolving experiments opening the totally unexplored field of interfacial spin structure, and in-operando field-effect experiments paving the way towards device applications of the reach physics of oxide interfaces.
  • Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments performed at the oxygen-$K$ edge on the iridate perovskites {\SIOS} and {\SION} reveal a sequence of well-defined dispersive modes over the energy range up to $\sim 0.8$ eV. The momentum dependence of these modes and their variation with the experimental geometry allows us to assign each of them to specific collective magnetic and/or electronic excitation processes, including single and bi-magnons, and spin-orbit and electron-hole excitons. We thus demonstrated that dispersive magnetic and electronic excitations are observable at the O-$K$ edge in the presence of the strong spin-orbit coupling in the $5d$ shell of iridium and strong hybridization between Ir $5d$ and O $2p$ orbitals, which confirm and expand theoretical expectations. More generally, our results establish the utility of O-$K$ edge RIXS for studying the collective excitations in a range of $5d$ materials that are attracting increasing attention due to their novel magnetic and electronic properties. Especially, the strong RIXS response at O-$K$ edge opens up the opportunity for investigating collective excitations in thin films and heterostructures fabricated from these materials.
  • We combine low energy muon spin rotation (LE-$\mu$SR) and soft-X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SX-ARPES) to study the magnetic and electronic properties of magnetically doped topological insulators based on (Bi,Sb)$_2$Te$_3$. We find that one achieves a full magnetic volume fraction in samples of (V/Cr)$_x$(Bi,Sb)$_{2-x}$Te$_3$ at doping levels x $\gtrsim$ 0.16. The observed magnetic transition is not sharp in temperature indicating a gradual magnetic ordering. We find that the evolution of magnetic ordering is consistent with formation of ferromagnetic islands which increase in number and/or volume with decreasing temperature. Resonant ARPES at the V $L_3$-edge reveals a nondispersing impurity band close to the Fermi level as well as V weight integrated into the host band structure. Calculations within the coherent potential approximation of the V contribution to the spectral function confirm that this impurity band is caused by V in substitutional sites. The implications on the observation of the quantum anomalous Hall effect at mK temperatures are discussed.
  • The angle-resolved photoemission spectra of the superconductor (Ba$_{1-x}$K$_x$)Fe$_2$As$_2$ have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Our results explain the previously obscured origins of all salient features of the ARPES response of this paradigm pnictide compound and reveal the origin of the Lifshitz transition. Comparison of calculated ARPES spectra with the underlying DMFT band structure shows an important impact of final state effects, which results for three-dimensional states in a deviation of the ARPES spectra from the true spectral function. In particular, the apparent effective mass enhancement seen in the ARPES response is not an entirely intrinsic property of the quasiparticle valence bands but may have a significant extrinsic contribution from the photoemission process and thus differ from its true value. Because this effect is more pronounced for low photoexcitation energies, soft-X-ray ARPES delivers more accurate values of the mass enhancement due to a sharp definition of the 3D electron momentum.
  • Engineered lattices in condensed matter physics, such as cold atom optical lattices or photonic crystals, can have fundamentally different properties from naturally-occurring electronic crystals. Here, we report a novel type of artificial quantum matter lattice. Our lattice is a multilayer heterostructure built from alternating thin films of topological and trivial insulators. Each interface within the heterostructure hosts a set of topologically-protected interface states, and by making the layers sufficiently thin, we demonstrate for the first time a hybridization of interface states across layers. In this way, our heterostructure forms an emergent atomic chain, where the interfaces act as lattice sites and the interface states act as atomic orbitals, as seen from our measurements by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). By changing the composition of the heterostructure, we can directly control hopping between lattice sites. We realize a topological and a trivial phase in our superlattice band structure. We argue that the superlattice may be characterized in a significant way by a one-dimensional topological invariant, closely related to the invariant of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. Our topological insulator heterostructure demonstrates a novel experimental platform where we can engineer band structures by directly controlling how electrons hop between lattice sites.
  • The electronic structure of \graySn(001) thin films strained compressively in-plane was studied both experimentally and theoretically. A new topological surface state (TSS) located entirely within the gapless projected bulk bands is revealed by \textit{ab initio}-based tight-binding calculations as well as directly accessed by soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission. The topological character of this state, which is a surface resonance, is confirmed by unravelling the band inversion and by calculating the topological invariants. In agreement with experiment, electronic structure calculations show the maximum density of states in the subsurface region, while the already established TSS near the Fermi level is strongly localized at the surface. Such varied behavior is explained by the differences in orbital composition between the specific TSS and its associated bulk states, respectively. This provides an orbital protection mechanism for topological states against mixing with the background of bulk bands.
  • We measured dispersive spin excitations in $\mathrm{SmFeAsO}$, parent compound of $\mathrm{SmFeAsO_{\text{1-x}}F_{\text{x}}}$ one of the highest temperature superconductors of Fe pnictides (T$_{\text{C}}\approx$55~K). We determine the magnetic excitations to disperse with a bandwidth energy of ca 170 meV at (0.47, 0) and (0.34, 0.34), which merges into the elastic line approaching the $\Gamma$ point. Comparing our results with other parent Fe pnictides, we show the importance of structural parameters for the magnetic excitation spectrum, with small modifications of the tetrahedron angles and As height strongly affecting the magnetism.
  • We have used Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) and dynamical susceptibility calculations to study the magnetic excitations in NaFe$_{1-x}$Co$_x$As (x = 0, 0.03, and 0.08). Despite a relatively low ordered magnetic moment, collective magnetic modes are observed in parent compounds (x = 0) and persist in optimally (x = 0.03) and overdoped (x = 0.08) samples. Their magnetic bandwidths are unaffected by doping within the range investigated. High energy magnetic excitations in iron pnictides are robust against doping, and present irrespectively of the ordered magnetic moment. Nevertheless, Co doping slightly reduces the overall magnetic spectral weight, differently from previous studies on hole-doped BaFe$_{2}$As$_{2}$, where it was observed constant. Finally, we demonstrate that the doping evolution of magnetic modes is different for the dopants being inside or outside the Fe-As layer.
  • Clarification of the position of the Fermi level ($E_\mathrm{F}$) is important in understanding the origin of ferromagnetism in the prototypical ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga$_{1-x}$Mn$_x$As (GaMnAs). In a recent publication, Souma $et$ $al$. [Sci. Rep. $\mathbf{6}$, 27266 (2016)], have investigated the band structure and the $E_\mathrm{F}$ position of GaMnAs using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and concluded that $E_\mathrm{F}$ is located in the valence band (VB). However, this conclusion contradicts a number of recent experimental results for GaMnAs, which showed that $E_\mathrm{F}$ is located above the VB maximum in the impurity band (IB). Here, we show an alternative interpretation of their ARPES experiments, which is consistent with those recent experiments and supports the picture that $E_\mathrm{F}$ is located above the VB maximum in the IB.
  • The metal-insulator transitions and the intriguing physical properties of rare-earth perovskite nickelates have attracted considerable attention in recent years. Nonetheless, a complete understanding of these materials remains elusive. Here, taking a NdNiO3 thin film as a representative example, we utilize a combination of x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopies to resolve important aspects of the complex electronic structure of the rare-earth nickelates. The unusual coexistence of bound and continuum excitations observed in the RIXS spectra provides strong evidence for the abundance of oxygen 2p holes in the ground state of these materials. Using cluster calculations and Anderson impurity model interpretation, we show that these distinct spectral signatures arise from a Ni 3d8 configuration along with holes in the oxygen 2p valence band, confirming suggestions that these materials do not obey a conventional positive charge-transfer picture, but instead exhibit a negative charge-transfer energy, in line with recent models interpreting the metal to insulator transition in terms of bond disproportionation.
  • We report theoretical and experimental discovery of Lorentz-violating Weyl fermion semimetal type-II state in the LaAlGe class of materials. Previously type-II Weyl state was predicted in WTe2 materials which remains unrealized in surface experiments. We show theoretically and experimentally that LaAlGe class of materials are the robust platforms for the study of type-II Weyl physics.
  • Silicon spintronics requires injection of spin-polarized carriers into Si. An emerging approach is direct electrical injection from a ferromagnetic semiconductor - EuO being the prime choice. Functionality of the EuO/Si spin contact is determined by the interface band alignment. In particular, the band offset should fall within the 0.5-2 eV range. We employ soft-X-ray ARPES to probe the electronic structure of the buried EuO/Si interface with momentum resolution and chemical specificity. The band structure reveals a conduction band offset of 1.0 eV attesting the technological potential of the EuO/Si system.
  • Strongly correlated insulators are broadly divided into two classes: Mott-Hubbard insulators, where the insulating gap is driven by the Coulomb repulsion $U$ on the transition-metal cation, and charge-transfer insulators, where the gap is driven by the charge transfer energy $\Delta$ between the cation and the ligand anions. The relative magnitudes of $U$ and $\Delta$ determine which class a material belongs to, and subsequently the nature of its low-energy excitations. These energy scales are typically understood through the local chemistry of the active ions. Here we show that the situation is more complex in the low-dimensional charge transfer insulator Li$_\mathrm{2}$CuO$_\mathrm{2}$, where $\Delta$ has a large non-electronic component. Combining resonant inelastic x-ray scattering with detailed modeling, we determine how the elementary lattice, charge, spin, and orbital excitations are entangled in this material. This results in a large lattice-driven renormalization of $\Delta$, which significantly reshapes the fundamental electronic properties of Li$_\mathrm{2}$CuO$_\mathrm{2}$.
  • We study the fate of the surface states of Bi$_2$Se$_3$ under disorder with strength larger than the bulk gap, caused by neon sputtering and nonmagnetic adsorbates. We find that neon sputtering introduces strong but dilute defects, which can be modeled by a unitary impurity distribution, whereas adsorbates, such as water vapor or carbon monoxide, are best described by Gaussian disorder. Remarkably, these two disorder types have a dramatically different effect on the surface states. Our soft x-ray ARPES measurements combined with numerical simulations show that unitary surface disorder pushes the Dirac state to inward quintuplet layers, burying it below an insulating surface layer. As a consequence, the surface spectral function becomes weaker, but retains its quasiparticle peak. This is in contrast to Gaussian disorder, which smears out the quasiparticle peak completely. At the surface of Bi$_2$Se$_3$, the effects of Gaussian disorder can be reduced by removing surface adsorbates using neon sputtering, which, however, introduces unitary scatterers. Since unitary disorder has a weaker effect than Gaussian disorder, the ARPES signal of the Dirac surface state becomes sharper upon sputtering.
  • Weyl semimetals are expected to open up new horizons in physics and materials science because they provide the first realization of Weyl fermions and exhibit protected Fermi arc surface states. However, they had been found to be extremely rare in nature. Recently, a family of compounds, consisting of TaAs, TaP, NbAs and NbP was predicted as Weyl semimetal candidates. Here, we experimentally realize a Weyl semimetal state in TaP. Using photoemission spectroscopy, we directly observe the Weyl fermion cones and nodes in the bulk and the Fermi arcs on the surface. Moreover, we find that the surface states show an unexpectedly rich structure, including both topological Fermi arcs and several topologically-trivial closed contours in the vicinity of the Weyl points, which provides a promising platform to study the interplay between topological and trivial surface states on a Weyl semimetal's surface. We directly demonstrate the bulk-boundary correspondence and hence establish the topologically nontrivial nature of the Weyl semimetal state in TaP, by resolving the net number of chiral edge modes on a closed path that encloses the Weyl node. This also provides, for the first time, an experimentally practical approach to demonstrating a bulk Weyl fermion from a surface state dispersion measured in photoemission.
  • Concept of a multichannel electron spin detector based on optical imaging principles and Mott scattering (iMott) is presented. A multichannel electron image produced by standard angle-resolving (photo) electron analyzer or microscope is re-imaged by an electrostatic lens at an accelerating voltage of 40 keV onto the Au target. Quasi-elastic electrons bearing spin asymmetry of the Mott scattering are imaged by magnetic lenses onto position-sensitive electron CCDs whose differential signals yield the multichannel spin asymmetry image. Fundamental advantages of this concept include acceptance of inherently divergent electron sources from the electron analyzer or microscope focal plane as well as small aberrations achieved by virtue of high accelerating voltages, as demonstrated by extensive ray-tracing analysis. The efficiency gain compared to the single-channel Mott detector can be a factor of more than 1e4 which opens new prospects of spin-resolved spectroscopies in application not only to standard bulk and surface systems (Rashba effect, topological insulators, etc.) but also to buried heterostructures. The simultaneous spin detection and fast CCD readout enable efficient use of the iMott detectors at X-ray FEL facilities.
  • Polarization-controlled synchrotron radiation was used to map the electronic structure of buried conducting interfaces of LaAlO$_3$/SrTiO$_3$ in a resonant angle-resolved photoemission experiment. A strong dependence on the light polarization of the Fermi surface and band dispersions is demonstrated, highlighting the distinct Ti 3d orbitals involved in 2D conduction. Samples with different 2D doping levels were prepared and measured by photoemission, revealing different band occupancies and Fermi surface shapes. A direct comparison between the photoemission measurements and advanced first-principle calculations carried out for different 3d-band fillings is presented in conjunction with the 2D carrier concentration obtained from transport measurements.
  • (Ga,Mn)As is a paradigm diluted magnetic semiconductor which shows ferromagnetism induced by doped hole carriers. With a few controversial models emerged from numerous experimental and theoretical studies, the mechanism of the ferromagnetism in (Ga,Mn)As still remains a puzzling enigma. In this Letter, we use soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to positively identify the ferromagnetic Mn 3d-derived impurity band in (Ga,Mn)As. The band appears hybridized with the light-hole band of the host GaAs. These findings conclude the picture of the valence band structure of (Ga,Mn)As disputed for more than a decade. The non-dispersive character of the IB and its location in vicinity of the valence-band maximum indicate that the Mn 3d-derived impurity band is formed as a split-off Mn-impurity state predicted by the Anderson impurity model. Responsible for the ferromagnetism in (Ga,Mn)As is the transport of hole carriers in the impurity band.
  • Interplay of the angle dependent X-ray reflectivity and absorption with the photoelectron attenuation length in the photoelectron emission process determine the optimal X-ray incidence angle which maximizes the photoelectron signal. Calculations in a wide VUV through hard-X-ray energy range show that the optimal angle goes with energy progressively more grazing from a few tens of degrees at 50 eV to about one degree at 3.5 keV accompanied by the intensity gain increasing up to a few tens of times as long as the X-ray footprint on the sample stays within the analyzer field of view. This trend is fairly material independent. The obtained results bear immediate implications for design of the (synchrotron based) photoelectron spectrometers.
  • We report a high-resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering study of the quantum magnetic spin-chain materials Li2CuO2 and CuGeO3. By tuning the incoming photon energy to the oxygen K-edge, a strong excitation around 3.5 eV energy loss is clearly resolved for both materials. Comparing the experimental data to many-body calculations, we identify this excitation as a Zhang-Rice singlet exciton on neighboring CuO4-plaquettes. We demonstrate that the strong temperature dependence of the inelastic scattering related to this high-energy exciton enables to probe short-range spin correlations on the 1 meV scale with outstanding sensitivity.
  • Atomically controlled crystal growth of thin films has established foundations of nanotechnology aimed at the development of advanced functional devices. Crystallization under non-equilibrium conditions allows engineering of new materials with their atomically-flat interfaces in the heterostructures exhibiting novel physical properties. From a fundamental point of view, knowledge of the electronic structures of thin films and their interfaces is indispensable to understand the origins of their functionality which further evolves into realistic device application. In view of extreme surface sensitivity of the conventional vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), with a probing depth of several angstroms, experiments on thin films have to use sophisticated in-situ sample transfer systems to avoid surface contamination. In this Letter, we put forward a method to circumvent these difficulties using soft X-ray (SX) ARPES. A GaAs:Be thin film in our samples was protected by an amorphous As layer with an thickness of $\sim 1$ nm exceeding the probing depth of the VUV photoemission with photon energy $h\nu$ around 100 eV. The increase of the probing depth with increasing $h\nu$ towards the SX region has clearly exposed the bulk band dispersion without any surface treatment. Any contributions from potential interface states between the thin film and the amorphous capping layer has been below the detection limit. Our results demonstrate that SX-ARPES enables the observation of coherent three-dimensional band dispersion of buried heterostructure layers through an amorphous capping layer, breaking through the necessity of surface cleaning of thin film samples. Thereby, this opens new frontiers in diagnostics of authentic momentum-resolved electronic structure of protected thin-film heterostructures.
  • Electronic structure of crystalline materials is their fundamental characteristic which is the basis of almost all their physical and chemical properties. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is the main experimental tool to study all electronic structure aspects with resolution in k-space. However, its application to three-dimensional (3D) materials suffers from a fundamental problem of ill-defined surface-perpendicular wavevector kz. Here, we achieve sharp definition of kz to enable precise navigation in 3D k space by pushing ARPES into the soft-X-ray photon energy range. Essential to break through the notorious problem of small photoexcitation cross-section was an advanced photon flux performance of our instrumentation. We explore the electronic structure of a transition metal dichalcogenide VSe2 which develops charge density waves (CDWs) possessing exotic 3D character. We experimentally identify nesting of its 3D Fermi surface (FS) as the precursor for these CDWs. Our study demonstrates an immense potential of soft-X-ray ARPES (SX-ARPES) to resolve various aspects of 3D electronic structure.
  • BiTeI has a layered and non-centrosymmetric structure where strong spin-orbit interaction leads to a giant spin splitting in the bulk bands. Here we present high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) data in the UV and soft x-ray regime that clearly disentangle the surface from the bulk electronic structure. Spin-resolved UV-ARPES measurements on opposite, non-equivalent surfaces show identical spin structures, thus clarifying the surface state character. Soft x-ray ARPES data clearly reveal the spindle-torus shape of the bulk Fermi surface, induced by the spin-orbit interaction.
  • We combine high-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering with cluster calculations utilizing a recently derived effective magnetic scattering operator to analyze the polarization, excitation energy, and momentum dependent excitation spectrum of the low-dimensional quantum magnet TiOCl in the range expected for orbital and magnetic excitations (0 - 2.5 eV). Ti 3d orbital excitations yield complete information on the temperature-dependent crystal-field splitting. In the spin-Peierls phase we observe a dispersive two-spinon excitation and estimate the inter- and intra-dimer magnetic exchange coupling from a comparison to cluster calculations.