• Tropical algebra emerges in many fields of mathematics such as algebraic geometry, mathematical physics and combinatorial optimization. In part, its importance is related to the fact that it makes various parameters of mathematical objects computationally accessible. Tropical polynomials play a fundamental role in this, especially for the case of algebraic geometry. On the other hand, many algebraic questions behind tropical polynomials remain open. In this paper we address four basic questions on tropical polynomials closely related to their computational properties: 1. Given a polynomial with a certain support (set of monomials) and a (finite) set of inputs, when is it possible for the polynomial to vanish on all these inputs? 2. A more precise question, given a polynomial with a certain support and a (finite) set of inputs, how many roots can this polynomial have on this set of inputs? 3. Given an integer $k$, for which $s$ there is a set of $s$ inputs such that any non-zero polynomial with at most $k$ monomials has a non-root among these inputs? 4. How many integer roots can have a one variable polynomial given by a tropical algebraic circuit? In the classical algebra well-known results in the direction of these questions are Combinatorial Nullstellensatz due to N. Alon, J. Schwartz - R. Zippel Lemma and Universal Testing Set for sparse polynomials respectively. The classical analog of the last question is known as $\tau$-conjecture due to M. Shub - S. Smale. In this paper we provide results on these four questions for tropical polynomials.
  • Our concern is the overhead of answering OWL 2 QL ontology-mediated queries (OMQs) in ontology-based data access compared to evaluating their underlying tree-shaped and bounded treewidth conjunctive queries (CQs). We show that OMQs with bounded-depth ontologies have nonrecursive datalog (NDL) rewritings that can be constructed and evaluated in LOGCFL for combined complexity, even in NL if their CQs are tree-shaped with a bounded number of leaves, and so incur no overhead in complexity-theoretic terms. For OMQs with arbitrary ontologies and bounded-leaf CQs, NDL-rewritings are constructed and evaluated in LOGCFL. We show experimentally feasibility and scalability of our rewritings compared to previously proposed NDL-rewritings. On the negative side, we prove that answering OMQs with tree-shaped CQs is not fixed-parameter tractable if the ontology depth or the number of leaves in the CQs is regarded as the parameter, and that answering OMQs with a fixed ontology (of infinite depth) is NP-complete for tree-shaped and LOGCFL for bounded-leaf CQs.
  • We study the following computational problem: for which values of $k$, the majority of $n$ bits $\text{MAJ}_n$ can be computed with a depth two formula whose each gate computes a majority function of at most $k$ bits? The corresponding computational model is denoted by $\text{MAJ}_k \circ \text{MAJ}_k$. We observe that the minimum value of $k$ for which there exists a $\text{MAJ}_k \circ \text{MAJ}_k$ circuit that has high correlation with the majority of $n$ bits is equal to $\Theta(n^{1/2})$. We then show that for a randomized $\text{MAJ}_k \circ \text{MAJ}_k$ circuit computing the majority of $n$ input bits with high probability for every input, the minimum value of $k$ is equal to $n^{2/3+o(1)}$. We show a worst case lower bound: if a $\text{MAJ}_k \circ \text{MAJ}_k$ circuit computes the majority of $n$ bits correctly on all inputs, then $k\geq n^{13/19+o(1)}$. This lower bound exceeds the optimal value for randomized circuits and thus is unreachable for pure randomized techniques. For depth $3$ circuits we show that a circuit with $k= O(n^{2/3})$ can compute $\text{MAJ}_n$ correctly on all inputs.
  • We show that, for OWL 2 QL ontology-mediated queries with (i) ontologies of bounded depth and conjunctive queries of bounded treewidth, (ii) ontologies of bounded depth and bounded-leaf tree-shaped conjunctive queries, and (iii) arbitrary ontologies and bounded-leaf tree-shaped conjunctive queries, one can construct and evaluate nonrecursive datalog rewritings by, respectively, LOGCFL, NL and LOGCFL algorithms, which matches the optimal combined complexity.
  • Tropical algebra is an emerging field with a number of applications in various areas of mathematics. In many of these applications appeal to tropical polynomials allows to study properties of mathematical objects such as algebraic varieties and algebraic curves from the computational point of view. This makes it important to study both mathematical and computational aspects of tropical polynomials. In this paper we prove a tropical Nullstellensatz and moreover we show an effective formulation of this theorem. Nullstellensatz is a natural step in building algebraic theory of tropical polynomials and its effective version is relevant for computational aspects of this field. On our way we establish a simple formulation of min-plus and tropical linear dualities. We also observe a close connection between tropical and min-plus polynomial systems.
  • Ontology-based data access is an approach to organizing access to a database augmented with a logical theory. In this approach query answering proceeds through a reformulation of a given query into a new one which can be answered without any use of theory. Thus the problem reduces to the standard database setting. However, the size of the query may increase substantially during the reformulation. In this survey we review a recently developed framework on proving lower and upper bounds on the size of this reformulation by employing methods and results from Boolean circuit complexity.
  • An integer polynomial $p$ of $n$ variables is called a \emph{threshold gate} for a Boolean function $f$ of $n$ variables if for all $x \in \zoon$ $f(x)=1$ if and only if $p(x)\geq 0$. The \emph{weight} of a threshold gate is the sum of its absolute values. In this paper we study how large a weight might be needed if we fix some function and some threshold degree. We prove $2^{\Omega(2^{2n/5})}$ lower bound on this value. The best previous bound was $2^{\Omega(2^{n/8})}$ (Podolskii, 2009). In addition we present substantially simpler proof of the weaker $2^{\Omega(2^{n/4})}$ lower bound. This proof is conceptually similar to other proofs of the bounds on weights of nonlinear threshold gates, but avoids a lot of technical details arising in other proofs. We hope that this proof will help to show the ideas behind the construction used to prove these lower bounds.
  • For matrix games we study how small nonzero probability must be used in optimal strategies. We show that for nxn win-lose-draw games (i.e. (-1,0,1) matrix games) nonzero probabilities smaller than n^{-O(n)} are never needed. We also construct an explicit nxn win-lose game such that the unique optimal strategy uses a nonzero probability as small as n^{-Omega(n)}. This is done by constructing an explicit (-1,1) nonsingular nxn matrix, for which the inverse has only nonnegative entries and where some of the entries are of value n^{Omega(n)}.
  • A tropical (or min-plus) semiring is a set $\mathbb{Z}$ (or $\mathbb{Z \cup \{\infty\}}$) endowed with two operations: $\oplus$, which is just usual minimum, and $\odot$, which is usual addition. In tropical algebra the vector $x$ is a solution to a polynomial $g_1(x) \oplus g_2(x) \oplus...\oplus g_k(x)$, where $g_i(x)$'s are tropical monomials, if the minimum in $\min_i(g_{i}(x))$ is attained at least twice. In min-plus algebra solutions of systems of equations of the form $g_1(x)\oplus...\oplus g_k(x) = h_1(x)\oplus...\oplus h_l(x)$ are studied. In this paper we consider computational problems related to tropical linear system. We show that the solvability problem (both over $\mathbb{Z}$ and $\mathbb{Z} \cup \{\infty\}$) and the problem of deciding the equivalence of two linear systems (both over $\mathbb{Z}$ and $\mathbb{Z} \cup \{\infty\}$) are equivalent under polynomial-time reduction to mean payoff games and are also equivalent to analogous problems in min-plus algebra. In particular, all these problems belong to $\mathsf{NP} \cap \mathsf{coNP}$. Thus we provide a tight connection of computational aspects of tropical linear algebra with mean payoff games and min-plus linear algebra. On the other hand we show that computing the dimension of the solution space of a tropical linear system and of a min-plus linear system are $\mathsf{NP}$-complete. We also extend some of our results to the systems of min-plus linear inequalities.