• We investigate the notion of quantumness based on the non-commutativity of the algebra of observables and introduce a measure of quantumness based on the mutual incompatibility of quantum states. We show that such a quantity can be experimentally measured with an interferometric setup and that, when an arbitrary bipartition of a given composite system is introduced, it detects the one-way quantum correlations restricted to one of the two subsystems. We finally show that, by combining only two projective measurements and carrying out the interference procedure, our measure becomes an efficient universal witness of quantum discord and non-classical correlations.
  • Quantum coherence stemming from the superposition behaviour of a particle beyond the classical realm, serves as one of the most fundamental features in quantum mechanics. The wave-particle duality phenomenon, which shares the same origin, has a strong relationship with quantum coherence. Recently, an elegant relation between quantum coherence and path information has been theoretically derived. Here, we experimentally test such new duality by l1-norm measure and the minimum-error state discrimination. We prepare three classes of two-photon states encoded in polarisation degree of freedom, with one photon serving as the target and the other photon as the detector. We observe that wave-particle-like complementarity and Bagan's equality, defined by the duality relation between coherence and path information, is well satisfied. Our results may shed new light on the original nature of wave-particle duality and on the applications of quantum coherence as a fundamental resource in quantum technologies.
  • The role of proton tunneling in biological catalysis is investigated here within the frameworks of quantum information theory and thermodynamics. We consider the quantum correlations generated through two hydrogen bonds between a substrate and a prototypical enzyme that first catalyzes the tautomerization of the substrate to move on to a subsequent catalysis, and discuss how the enzyme can derive its catalytic potency from these correlations. In particular, we show that classical changes induced in the binding site of the enzyme spreads the quantum correlations among all of the four hydrogen-bonded atoms thanks to the directionality of hydrogen bonds. If the enzyme rapidly returns to its initial state after the binding stage, the substrate ends in a new transition state corresponding to a quantum superposition. Open quantum system dynamics can then naturally drive the reaction in the forward direction from the major tautomeric form to the minor tautomeric form without needing any additional catalytic activity. We find that in this scenario the enzyme lowers the activation energy so much that there is no energy barrier left in the tautomerization, even if the quantum correlations quickly decay.
  • A paramount topic in quantum foundations, rooted in the study of the EPR paradox and Bell inequalities, is that of characterizing quantum theory in terms of the space-like correlations it allows. Here we show that to focus only on space-like correlations is not enough: we explicitly construct a toy model theory that, while not contradicting classical and quantum theories at the level of space-like correlations, still displays an anomalous behavior in its time-like correlations. We call this anomaly, quantified in terms of a specific communication game, the "hypersignaling" phenomena. We hence conclude that the "principle of quantumness," if it exists, cannot be found in space-like correlations alone: nontrivial constraints need to be imposed also on time-like correlations, in order to exclude hypersignaling theories.
  • Thermodynamics describes large-scale, slowly evolving systems. Two modern approaches generalize thermodynamics: fluctuation theorems, which concern finite-time nonequilibrium processes, and one-shot statistical mechanics, which concerns small scales and finite numbers of trials. Combining these approaches, we calculate a one-shot analog of the average dissipated work defined in fluctuation contexts: the cost of performing a protocol in finite time instead of quasistatically. The average dissipated work has been shown to be proportional to a relative entropy between phase-space densities, to a relative entropy between quantum states, and to a relative entropy between probability distributions over possible values of work. We derive one-shot analogs of all three equations, demonstrating that the order-infinity Renyi divergence is proportional to the maximum possible dissipated work in each case. These one-shot analogs of fluctuation-theorem results contribute to the unification of these two toolkits for small-scale, nonequilibrium statistical physics.
  • Given a physical device as a black box, one can in principle fully reconstruct its input-output transfer function by repeatedly feeding different input probes through the device and performing different measurements on the corresponding outputs. However, for such a complete tomographic reconstruction to work, full knowledge of both input probes and output measurements is required. Such an assumption is not only experimentally demanding, but also logically questionable, as it produces a circular argument in which the characterization of unknown devices appears to require other devices to have been already characterized beforehand. Here, we introduce a method to overcome such limitations present in usual tomographic techniques. We show that, even without any knowledge about the tomographic apparatus, it is still possible to infer the unknown device to a high degree of precision, solely relying on the observed data. This is achieved by employing a criterion that singles out the minimal explanation compatible with the observed data. Our method, that can be seen as a device-independent analogue of tomography, is solved analytically and experimentally tested in an actual implementation with superconducting qubits for a broad class of quantum channels.
  • The capacity of a channel is known to be equivalent to the highest rate at which it can generate entanglement. Analogous to entanglement, the notion of quantum causality characterises the temporal aspect of quantum correlations. Despite holding an equally fundamental role in physics, temporal quantum correlations have yet to find their operational significance in quantum communication. Here we uncover a connection between quantum causality and channel capacity. We show the amount of temporal correlations between two ends of the noisy quantum channel, as quantified by a causality measure, implies a general upper bound on its channel capacity. The expression of this new bound is simpler to evaluate than most previously known bounds. We demonstrate the utility of this bound by applying it to a class of shifted depolarizing channels, which results in improvement over previously known bounds for this class of channels.
  • An experimental test of quantum effects in gravity has recently been proposed, where the ability of the gravitational field to entangle two masses is used as a witness of its quantum nature. The key idea is that if gravity can generate entanglement between two masses then it must have at least some quantum features (i.e., two non-commuting observables). Here we discuss what existing models for coupled matter and gravity predict for this experiment. Collapse-type models, and also quantum field theory in curved spacetime, as well as various induced gravities, do not predict entanglement generation; they would therefore be ruled out by observing entanglement in the experiment. Instead, local linearised quantum gravity models predict that the masses can become entangled. We analyse the mechanism by which entanglement is established in such models, modelling a gravity-assisted two-qubit gate.
  • Several experimental and theoretical studies report instances of concerted or correlated multiple proton tunneling in solid phases of water. Here, we construct a pseudo-spin model for the quantum motion of protons in a hexameric H$_2$O ring and extend it to open system dynamics that takes environmental effects into account in the form of O$-$H stretch vibrations. We approach the problem of correlations in tunneling using quantum information theory in a departure from previous studies. Our formalism enables us to quantify the coherent proton mobility around the hexagonal ring by one of the principal measures of coherence, the $l_1$ norm of coherence. The nature of the pairwise pseudo-spin correlations underlying the overall mobility is further investigated within this formalism. We show that the classical correlations of the individual quantum tunneling events in long-time limit is sufficient to capture the behaviour of coherent proton mobility observed in low-temperature experiments. We conclude that long-range intra-ring interactions do not appear to be a necessary condition for correlated proton tunneling in water ice.
  • The answer will be a "yes" (despite looking like a violation of the Uncertainty Principle).
  • It is desirable to observe synchronization of quantum systems in the quantum regime, defined by low number of excitations and a highly non-classical steady state of the self-sustained oscillator. Several existing proposals of observing synchronization in the quantum regime suffer from the fact that the noise statistics overwhelms synchronization in this regime. Here we resolve this issue by driving a self-sustained oscillator with a squeezing Hamiltonian instead of a harmonic drive and analyze this system in the classical and quantum regime. We demonstrate that strong entrainment is possible for small values of squeezing, and in this regime the states are non-classical. Furthermore, we show that the quality of synchronization measured by the FWHM of the power spectrum is enhanced with squeezing.
  • Important properties of a quantum system are not directly measurable, but they can be disclosed by how fast the system changes under controlled perturbations. In particular, asymmetry and entanglement can be verified by reconstructing the state of a quantum system. Yet, this usually requires experimental and computational resources which increase exponentially with the system size. Here we show how to detect metrologically useful asymmetry and entanglement by a limited number of measurements. This is achieved by studying how they affect the speed of evolution of a system under a unitary transformation. We show that the speed of multiqubit systems can be evaluated by measuring a set of local observables, providing exponential advantage with respect to state tomography. Indeed, the presented method requires neither the knowledge of the state and the parameter-encoding Hamiltonian nor global measurements performed on all the constituent subsystems. We implement the detection scheme in an all-optical experiment.
  • Simulating the stochastic evolution of real quantities on a digital computer requires a trade-off between the precision to which these quantities are approximated, and the memory required to store them. The statistical accuracy of the simulation is thus generally limited by the internal memory available to the simulator. Here, using tools from computational mechanics, we show that quantum processors with a fixed finite memory can simulate stochastic processes of real variables to arbitrarily high precision. This demonstrates a provable, unbounded memory advantage that a quantum simulator can exhibit over its best possible classical counterpart.
  • Modern physics has unlocked a number of mysteries regarding the early Universe, such as the baryogenesis, the unification of the strong and electroweak forces and the nucleosynthesis. However, understanding the very early Universe, close to the Planck epoch, still presents a major challenge. The theory of inflation, which is assumed to have taken place towards the end of the very early Universe, has been introduced in order to solve a number of cosmological problems. However, concrete observational evidence for inflation is still outstanding and the physical mechanisms behind inflation remain mostly unknown. In this paper we argue for inflation from a different standpoint. In order for time to have any concrete physical meaning in the very early and the early Universe, the capacity of the Universe to measure time - its size or, equivalently, memory - must be at least as large as the number of clock "ticks" that need to be recorded somewhere within the Universe. Using this simple criterion, we provide a sketch proof showing that in the absence of inflation the subsystems of the Universe might not have been able to undertake the synchronised evolution described by the time we use today.
  • We establish a general operational one-to-one mapping between coherence measures and entanglement measures: Any entanglement measure of bipartite pure states is the minimum of a suitable coherence measure over product bases. Any coherence measure of pure states, with extension to mixed states by convex roof, is the maximum entanglement generated by incoherent operations acting on the system and an incoherent ancilla. Remarkably, the generalized CNOT gate is the universal optimal incoherent operation. In this way, all convex-roof coherence measures, including the coherence of formation, are endowed with (additional) operational interpretations. By virtue of this connection, many results on entanglement can be translated to the coherence setting, and vice versa. As applications, we provide tight observable lower bounds for generalized entanglement concurrence and coherence concurrence, which enable experimentalists to quantify entanglement and coherence of the maximal dimension in real experiments.
  • As Lanzagorta and Crowder have shown in their Comment [Phys. Rev. A 96, 026101 (2017)], the linear application of the Wigner rotations to the quantum state of two massive relativistic particles does not entail the instantaneous transmission of information as we concluded in our paper [Phys. Rev. A 87, 042102 (2013)]. But in the new version of our paper in arXiv [arXiv:1303.4367v2] we show (and solve) another paradox that is generated by the linear application of the Wigner rotations to a system with a single relativistic particle. So the conclusion of our paper that we cannot in general linearly apply the Wigner rotations to the quantum state of a relativistic particle without considering the appropriate physical interpretation is still valid, although the paradox presented in that paper is inappropriate.
  • The minimal memory required to model a given stochastic process - known as the statistical complexity - is a widely adopted quantifier of structure in complexity science. Here, we ask if quantum mechanics can fundamentally change the qualitative behaviour of this measure. We study this question in the context of the classical Ising spin chain. In this system, the statistical complexity is known to grow monotonically with temperature. We evaluate the spin chain's quantum mechanical statistical complexity by explicitly constructing its provably simplest quantum model, and demonstrate that this measure exhibits drastically different behaviour: it rises to a maximum at some finite temperature then tends back towards zero for higher temperatures. This demonstrates how complexity, as captured by the amount of memory required to model a process, can exhibit radically different behaviour when quantum processing is allowed.
  • For $N$ hard-core bosons on an arbitrary lattice with $d$ sites and independent of additional interaction terms we prove that the hard-core constraint itself already enforces a universal upper bound on the Bose-Einstein condensate given by $N_{max}=(N/d)(d-N+1)$. This bound can only be attained for one-particle states $|\varphi\rangle$ with equal amplitudes with respect to the hard-core basis (sites) and when the corresponding $N$-particle state $|\Psi\rangle$ is maximally delocalized. This result is generalized to the maximum condensate possible within a given sublattice. We observe that such maximal local condensation is only possible if the mode entanglement between the sublattice and its complement is minimal. We also show that the maximizing state $|\Psi\rangle$ is related to the ground state of a bosonic `Hubbard star' showing Bose-Einstein condensation.
  • All existing quantum gravity proposals share the same deep problem. Their predictions are extremely hard to test in practice. Quantum effects in the gravitational field are exceptionally small, unlike those in the electromagnetic field. The fundamental reason is that the gravitational coupling constant is about 43 orders of magnitude smaller than the fine structure constant, which governs light-matter interactions. For example, the detection of gravitons -- the hypothetical quanta of energy of the gravitational field predicted by certain quantum-gravity proposals -- is deemed to be practically impossible. In this letter we adopt a radically different, quantum-information-theoretic approach which circumvents the problem that quantum gravity is hard to test. We propose an experiment to witness quantum-like features in the gravitational field, by probing it with two masses each in a superposition of two locations. First, we prove the fact that any system (e.g. a field) capable of mediating entanglement between two quantum systems must itself be quantum. This argument is general and does not rely on any specific dynamics. Then, we propose an experiment to detect the entanglement generated between two masses via gravitational interaction. By our argument, the degree of entanglement between the masses is an indirect witness of the quantisation of the field mediating the interaction. Remarkably, this experiment does not require any quantum control over gravity itself. It is also closer to realisation than other proposals, such as detecting gravitons or detecting quantum gravitational vacuum fluctuations.
  • It is shown that a general model for particle detection in combination with a linear application of the Wigner rotations, which correspond to momentum-dependent changes of the particle spin under Lorentz transformations, to the state of a massive relativistic particle in a superposition of two counter-propagating momentum states leads to a paradox. The paradoxical behavior is that the probability of finding the particle at different positions would depend on the reference frame. A solution to the paradox is given when the physical construction of the corresponding state is taken into account, suggesting that we cannot in general linearly apply the Wigner rotations to a quantum state without considering the appropriate physical interpretation.
  • We present a fluctuation theorem for quantum bipartite systems in which the subsystems exchange information with each other. Our information fluctuation theorem includes correlations by introducing a quantum mechanical mutual information content and a statistical probability distribution which allows one to consider statistical averages when computing the thermodynamic and informational quantities. The fundamental limit of heat transferred from a heat reservoir for quantum bipartite systems involving the quantum mutual information is then derived. We illustrate the use of our thermodynamic inequality in quantum computing and discuss our results in terms of Landauer's principle.
  • We consider the problem of characterizing the set of input-output correlations that can be generated by an arbitrarily given quantum measurement. Our main result is to provide a closed-form, full characterization of such a set for any qubit measurement, and to discuss its geometrical interpretation. As applications, we further specify our results to the cases of real and complex symmetric, informationally complete measurements and mutually unbiased bases of a qubit, in the presence of isotropic noise. Our results provide the optimal device-independent tests of quantum measurements.
  • Many organisms capitalize on their ability to predict the environment to maximize available free energy, and reinvest this energy to create new complex structures. This functionality relies on the manipulation of patterns - temporally ordered sequences of data. Here, we propose a framework to describe pattern manipulators -- devices that convert thermodynamic work to patterns or vice versa - and use them to build a 'pattern engine' that facilitates a thermodynamic cycle of pattern creation and consumption. We show that the least heat dissipation is achieved by the provably simplest devices; the ones that exhibit desired operational behaviour while maintaining the least internal memory. We derive the ultimate limits of this heat dissipation, and show that it is generally non-zero and connected with the pattern's intrinsic crypticity - a complexity theoretic quantity that captures the puzzling difference between the amount of information the pattern's past behaviour reveals about its future, and the amount one needs to communicate about this past to optimally predict the future.
  • We derive an equality for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics in finite-dimensional quantum systems. The equality concerns the worst-case work output of a time-dependent Hamiltonian protocol in the presence of a Markovian heat bath. It has has the form "worst-case work = penalty - optimum". The equality holds for all rates of changing the Hamiltonian and can be used to derive the optimum by setting the penalty to 0. The optimum term contains the max entropy of the initial state, rather than the von Neumann entropy, thus recovering recent results from single-shot statistical mechanics. Energy coherences can arise during the protocol but are assumed not to be present initially. We apply the equality to an electron box.
  • Witnessing non-classicality in the gravitational field has been claimed to be practically impossible. This constitutes a deep problem, which has even lead some researchers to question whether gravity should be quantised, due to the weakness of quantum effects. To counteract these claims, we propose a thought experiment that witnesses non-classicality of a physical system by probing it with a qubit. Remarkably, this experiment does not require any quantum control of the system, involving only measuring a single classical observable on that system. In addition, our scheme does not even assume any specific dynamics. That non-classicality of a system can be established indirectly, by coupling it to a qubit, opens up the possibility that quantum gravitational effects could in fact be witnessed in the lab.