• We report the discovery of four transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey: HATS-39b, HATS-40b, HATS41b and HATS-42b. These discoveries add to the growing number of transiting planets orbiting moderately bright (12.5 < V < 13.7) F dwarf stars on short (2-5 day) periods. The planets have similar radii, ranging from 1.33(+0.29/-0.20) R_J for HATS-41b to 1.58(+0.16/-0.12) R_J for HATS-40b. Their masses and bulk densities, however, span more than an order of magnitude. HATS-39b has a mass of 0.63 +/- 0.13 M_J, and an inflated radius of 1.57 +/- 0.12 R_J, making it a good target for future transmission spectroscopic studies. HATS-41b is a very massive 9.7 +/- 1.6 M_J planet and one of only a few hot Jupiters found to date with a mass over 5 M_J. This planet orbits the highest metallicity star ([Fe/H] = 0.470 +/- 0.010) known to host a transiting planet and is also likely on an eccentric orbit. The high mass, coupled with a relatively young age (1.34 +0.31/-0.51 Gyr) for the host star, are factors that may explain why this planet's orbit has not yet circularised.
  • We report the discovery of four close-in transiting exoplanets, HATS-50 through HATS-53, discovered using the HATSouth three-continent network of homogeneous and automated telescopes. These new exoplanets belong to the class of hot Jupiters and orbit G-type dwarf stars, with brightness in the range V=12.5-14.0 mag. While HATS-53 has many physical characteristics similar to the Sun, the other three stars appear to be metal rich, larger and more massive. Three of the new exoplanets, namely HATS-50, HATS-51 and HATS-53, have low density and similar orbital period. Instead, HATS-52 is more dense and has a shorter orbital period. It also receives an intensive radiation from its parent star and, consequently, presents a high equilibrium temperature. HATS-50 shows a marginal additional transit feature consistent with an ultra-short period hot super Neptune, which will be able to be confirmed with TESS photometry.
  • We report the discovery of four short period extrasolar planets transiting moderately bright stars from photometric measurements of the HATSouth network coupled to additional spectroscopic and photometric follow-up observations. While the planet masses range from 0.26 to 0.90 M$_J$, the radii are all approximately a Jupiter radii, resulting in a wide range of bulk densities. The orbital period of the planets range from 2.7d to 4.7d, with HATS-43b having an orbit that appears to be marginally non-circular (e= 0.173$\pm$0.089). HATS-44 is notable for a high metallicity ([Fe/H]= 0.320$\pm$0.071). The host stars spectral types range from late F to early K, and all of them are moderately bright (13.3<V<14.4), allowing the execution of future detailed follow-up observations. HATS-43b and HATS-46b, with expected transmission signals of 2350 ppm and 1500 ppm, respectively, are particularly well suited targets for atmospheric characterisation via transmission spectroscopy.
  • We report on the result of a campaign to monitor 25 HATSouth candidates using the K2 space telescope during Campaign 7 of the K2 mission. We discover HATS-36b (EPIC 215969174b), a hot Jupiter with a mass of 2.79$\pm$0.40 M$_J$ and a radius of 1.263$\pm$0.045 R$_J$ which transits a solar-type G0V star (V=14.386) in a 4.1752d period. We also refine the properties of three previously discovered HATSouth transiting planets (HATS-9b, HATS-11b, and HATS-12b) and search the K2 data for TTVs and additional transiting planets in these systems. In addition we also report on a further three systems that remain as Jupiter-radius transiting exoplanet candidates. These candidates do not have determined masses, however pass all of our other vetting observations. Finally we report on the 18 candidates which we are now able to classify as eclipsing binary or blended eclipsing binary systems based on a combination of the HATSouth data, the K2 data, and follow-up ground-based photometry and spectroscopy. These range in periods from 0.7 days to 16.7 days, and down to 1.5 mmag in eclipse depths. Our results show the power of combining ground-based imaging and spectroscopy with higher precision space-based photometry, and serve as an illustration as to what will be possible when combining ground-based observations with TESS data.
  • We report the discovery of HAT-P-67b, a hot-Saturn transiting a rapidly rotating F-subgiant. HAT-P-67b has a radius of Rp = 2.085 -0.071/+0.096 RJ,, orbiting a M* = 1.642 -0.072/+0.155 Msun, R* = 2.546 -0.084/+0.099 Rsun host star in a ~4.81-day period orbit. We place an upper limit on the mass of the planet via radial velocity measurements to be Mp < 0.59 MJ, and lower limit of > 0.056 MJ by limitations on Roche lobe overflow. Despite being a subgiant, the host star still exhibits relatively rapid rotation, with a projected rotational velocity of v sin I* = 35.8 +/- 1.1 km/s, making it difficult to precisely determine the mass of the planet using radial velocities. We validated HAT-P-67b via two Doppler tomographic detections of the planetary transit, which eliminated potential eclipsing binary blend scenarios. The Doppler tomographic observations also confirmed that HAT-P-67b has an orbit that is aligned to within 12 degrees, in projection, with the spin of its host star. HAT-P-67b receives strong UV irradiation, and is amongst the one of the lowest density planets known, making it a good candidate for future UV transit observations to search for an extended hydrogen exosphere.
  • Observations were made of the open clusters M35 and NGC 2158 during the initial K2 campaign (C0). Reducing these data to high-precision photometric time-series is challenging due to the wide point spread function (PSF) and the blending of stellar light in such dense regions. We developed an image-subtraction-based K2 reduction pipeline that is applicable to both crowded and sparse stellar fields. We applied our pipeline to the data-rich C0 K2 super-stamp, containing the two open clusters, as well as to the neighboring postage stamps. In this paper, we present our image subtraction reduction pipeline and demonstrate that this technique achieves ultra-high photometric precision for sources in the C0 super-stamp. We extract the raw light curves of 3960 stars taken from the UCAC4 and EPIC catalogs and de-trend them for systematic effects. We compare our photometric results with the prior reductions published in the literature. For detrended, TFA-corrected sources in the 12--12.25 $\rm K_{p}$ magnitude range, we achieve a best 6.5 hour window running rms of 35 ppm falling to 100 ppm for fainter stars in the 14--14.25 $ \rm K_{p}$ magnitude range. For stars with $\rm K_{p}> 14$, our detrended and 6.5 hour binned light curves achieve the highest photometric precision. Moreover, all our TFA-corrected sources have higher precision on all time scales investigated. This work represents the first published image subtraction analysis of a K2 super-stamp. This method will be particularly useful for analyzing the Galactic bulge observations carried out during K2 campaign 9. The raw light curves and the final results of our detrending processes are publicly available at \url{http://k2.hatsurveys.org/archive/}.
  • We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-18 b: a 1.980 +/- 0.077 Mj, 1.337 +0.102 -0.049 Rj planet in a 0.8378 day orbit, around a solar analog star (mass 1.037 +/- 0.047 Msun, and radius 1.020 +0.057 -0.031 Rsun) with V=14.067 +/- 0.040 mag. The high planet mass, combined with its short orbital period, implies strong tidal coupling between the planetary orbit and the star. In fact, given its inferred age, HATS-18 shows evidence of significant tidal spin up, which together with WASP-19 (a very similar system) allows us to constrain the tidal quality factor for Sun-like stars to be in the range 6.5 <= lg(Q*/k_2) <= 7 even after allowing for extremely pessimistic model uncertainties. In addition, the HATS-18 system is among the best systems (and often the best system) for testing a multitude of star--planet interactions, be they gravitational, magnetic or radiative, as well as planet formation and migration theories.
  • We report the discovery of five new transiting hot Jupiter planets discovered by the HATSouth survey: HATS-31b through HATS-35b. These planets orbit moderately bright stars with V magnitudes within the range 11.9-14.4mag while the planets span a range of masses 0.88-1.22MJ, and have somewhat inflated radii between 1.23-1.64RJ.These planets can be classified as typical hot Jupiters, with HATS-31b and HATS-35b being moderately inflated gas giant planets with radii of $1.64 \pm 0.22$ RJ and 1.464+0.069-0.044RJ, respectively, that can be used to constrain inflation mechanisms. All five systems present a higher Bayesian evidence for a fixed circular orbit model than for an eccentric orbit. The orbital periods range from $1.8209993 \pm 0.0000016$ day for HATS-35b) to $3.377960 \pm 0.000012$ day for HATS-31b. Additionally, HATS-35b orbits a relatively young F star with an age of $2.13 \pm 0.51$ Gyr. We discuss the analysis to derive the properties of these systems and compare them in the context of the sample of well characterized transiting hot Jupiters known to date.
  • We report the discovery by the HATSouth exoplanet survey of three hot-Saturn transiting exoplanets: HATS-19b, HATS-20b, and HATS-21b. The planet host HATS-19 is a slightly evolved V = 13.0 G0 star with [Fe/H] = 0.240, a mass of 1.303 Msun, and a radius of 1.75 Rsun. HATS-19b is in an eccentric orbit (e = 0.30) around this star with an orbital period of 4.5697 days and has a mass of 0.427 Mjup and a highly inflated radius of 1.66 Rjup. The planet HATS-20b has a Saturn-like mass and radius of 0.273 Mjup and 0.776 Rjup respectively. It orbits the V = 13.8 G9V star HATS-20 (Ms = 0.910 Msun; Rs = 0.892 Rsun) with a period of 3.7993 days. Finally, HATS-21 is a V = 12.2 G4V star with [Fe/H] = 0.300, a mass of 1.080 Msun, and a radius of 1.021 Rsun. Its accompanying planet HATS-21b has a 3.5544-day orbital period, a mass of 0.332 Mjup, and a moderately inflated radius of 1.123 Rjup. With the addition of these three very different planets to the growing sample of hot-Saturns, we re-examine the relations between the observed giant planet radii, stellar irradiation, and host metallicity. We find a significant positive correlation between planet equilibrium temperature and radius, and a weak negative correlation between host metallicity and radius. To assess the relative influence of various physical parameters on observed planet radii, we train and fit models using Random Forest regression. We find that for hot-Saturns (0.1 < Mp < 0.5 Mjup), the planetary mass and equilibrium temperature play dominant roles in determining radii. For hot-Jupiters (0.5 < Mp < 2.0 Mjup), the most important parameter is equilibrium temperature alone. Finally, for irradiated higher-mass planets (Mp > 2.0 Mjup), we find that equilibrium temperature dominates in influence, with smaller contributions from planet mass and host metallicity.
  • We report six new inflated hot Jupiters (HATS-25b through HATS-30b) discovered using the HATSouth global network of automated telescopes. The planets orbit stars with $V$ magnitudes in the range $\sim 12-14$ and have masses in the largely populated $0.5M_J-0.7M_J$ region of parameter space but span a wide variety of radii, from $1.17R_J$ to $1.75 R_J$. HATS-25b, HATS-28b, HATS-29b and HATS-30b are typical inflated hot Jupiters ($R_p = 1.17-1.26R_J$) orbiting G-type stars in short period ($P=3.2-4.6$ days) orbits. However, HATS-26b ($R_p = 1.75R_J$, $P = 3.3024$ days) and HATS-27b ($R_p=1.50R_J$, $P=4.6370$ days) stand out as highly inflated planets orbiting slightly evolved F stars just after and in the turn-off points, respectively, which are among the least dense hot Jupiters, with densities of $0.153$ g cm$^{-3}$ and $0.180$ g cm$^{-3}$, respectively. All the presented exoplanets but HATS-27b are good targets for future atmospheric characterization studies, while HATS-27b is a prime target for Rossiter-McLaughlin monitoring in order to determine its spin-orbit alignment given the brightness ($V = 12.8$) and stellar rotational velocity ($v \sin i \approx 9.3$ km/s) of the host star. These discoveries significantly increase the number of inflated hot Jupiters known, contributing to our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for hot Jupiter inflation.
  • We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets from the HATSouth survey. HATS-11, a V=14.1 G0-star shows a periodic 12.9 mmag dip in its light curve every 3.6192 days and a radial velocity variation consistent with a Keplerian orbit. HATS-11 has a mass of 1.000 $\pm$ 0.060 M$_{\odot}$, a radius of 1.444 $\pm$ 0.057 M$_{\odot}$ and an effective temperature of 6060 $\pm$ 150 K, while its companion is a 0.85 $\pm$ 0.12 M$_J$, 1.510 $\pm$ 0.078 R$_J$ planet in a circular orbit. HATS-12 shows a periodic 5.1 mmag flux decrease every 3.1428 days and Keplerian RV variations around a V=12.8 F-star. HATS-12 has a mass of 1.489 $\pm$ 0.071 M$_{\odot}$, a radius of 2.21 $\pm$ 0.21 R$_{\odot}$, and an effective temperature of 6408 $\pm$ 75 K. For HATS-12, our measurements indicate that this is a 2.38 $\pm$ 0.11 M$_J$, 1.35 $\pm$ 0.17 R$_J$ planet in a circular orbit. Both host stars show sub-solar metallicity of -0.390 $\pm$ 0.060 dex and -0.100 $\pm$ 0.040 dex, respectively and are (slightly) evolved stars. In fact, HATS-11 is amongst the most metal-poor and, HATS-12 is amongst the most evolved stars hosting a hot Jupiter planet. Importantly, HATS-11 and HATS-12 have been observed in long cadence by Kepler as part of K2 campaign 7 (EPIC216414930 and EPIC218131080 respectively).
  • We report the discovery of HATS-15 b and HATS-16 b, two massive transiting extrasolar planets orbiting evolved ($\sim 10$ Gyr) main-sequence stars. The planet HATS-15 b, which is hosted by a G9V star ($V=14.8$ mag), is a hot Jupiter with mass of $2.17\pm0.15\, M_{\mathrm{J}}$ and radius of $1.105\pm0.0.040\, R_{\mathrm{J}}$, and completes its orbit in nearly 1.7 days. HATS-16 b is a very massive hot Jupiter with mass of $3.27\pm0.19\, M_{\mathrm{J}}$ and radius of $1.30\pm0.15\, R_{\mathrm{J}}$; it orbits around its G3 V parent star ($V=13.8$ mag) in $\sim2.7$ days. HATS-16 is slightly active and shows a periodic photometric modulation, implying a rotational period of 12 days which is unexpectedly short given its isochronal age. This fast rotation might be the result of the tidal interaction between the star and its planet.
  • We report the discovery of HATS-17b, the first transiting warm Jupiter of the HATSouth network. HATS-17b transits its bright (V=12.4) G-type (M$_{\star}$=1.131 $\pm$ 0.030 M$_{\odot}$, R$_{\star}$=1.091$^{+0.070}_{-0.046}$ R$_{\star}$) metal-rich ([Fe/H]=+0.3 dex) host star in a circular orbit with a period of P=16.2546 days. HATS-17b has a very compact radius of 0.777 $\pm$ 0.056 R$_J$ given its Jupiter-like mass of 1.338 $\pm$ 0.065 M$_J$. Up to 50% of the mass of HATS-17b may be composed of heavy elements in order to explain its high density with current models of planetary structure. HATS-17b is the longest period transiting planet discovered to date by a ground-based photometric survey, and is one of the brightest transiting warm Jupiter systems known. The brightness of HATS-17b will allow detailed follow-up observations to characterize the orbital geometry of the system and the atmosphere of the planet.
  • The two reaction wheel K2 mission promises and has delivered new discoveries in the stellar and exoplanet fields. However, due to the loss of accurate pointing, it also brings new challenges for the data reduction processes. In this paper, we describe a new reduction pipeline for extracting high precision photometry from the K2 dataset, and present public light curves for the K2 Campaign 1 target pixel dataset. Key to our reduction is the derivation of global astrometric solutions from the target stamps, from which accurate centroids are passed on for high precision photometry extraction. We extract target light curves for sources from a combined UCAC4 and EPIC catalogue -- this includes not only primary targets of the K2 campaign 1, but also any other stars that happen to fall on the pixel stamps. We provide the raw light curves, and the products of various detrending processes aimed at removing different types of systematics. Our astrometric solutions achieve a median residual of ~ 0.13". For bright stars, our best 6.5 hour precision for raw light curves is ~20 parts per million (ppm). For our detrended light curves, the best 6.5 hour precisions achieved is ~15 ppm. We show that our detrended light curves have fewer systematic effects (or trends, or red-noise) than light curves produced by other groups from the same observations. Example light curves of transiting planets and a Cepheid variable candidate, are also presented. We make all light curves public, including the raw and de-trended photometry, at http://k2.hatsurveys.org.
  • IW ../submit_V2/abstract.txt ( Row 1 Col 1 6:48 Ctrl-K H for help We report the discovery by the HATSouth network of HATS-7b, a transiting Super-Neptune with a mass of 0.120+/-0.012MJ, a radius of 0.563+/-(0.046,0.034)RJ, and an orbital period of 3.1853days. The host star is a moderately bright (V=13.340+/-0.010mag, K_S=10.976+/-0.026mag) K dwarf star with a mass of 0.849+/-0.027Msun , a radius of 0.815+/-(0.049,-0.035)Rsun, and a metallicity of [Fe/H]=+0.250+/-0.080. The star is photometrically quiet to within the precision of the HATSouth measurements and has low RV jitter. HATS-7b is the second smallest radius planet discovered by a wide-field ground-based transit survey, and one of only a handful of Neptune-size planets with mass and radius determined to 10% precision. Theoretical modeling of HATS-7b yields a hydrogen-helium fraction of 18+/-4% (rock-iron core and H2-He envelope), or 9+/-4% (ice core and H2-He envelope), i.e.it has a composition broadly similar to that of Uranus and Neptune, and very different from that of Saturn, which has 75% of its mass in H2-He. Based on a sample of transiting exoplanets with accurately (<20%) determined parameters, we establish approximate power-law relations for the envelopes of the mass-density distribution of exoplanets. HATS-7b, which, together with the recently discovered HATS-8b, is one of the first two transiting super-Neptunes discovered in the Southern sky, is a prime target for additional follow-up observations with Southern hemisphere facilities to characterize the atmospheres of Super-Neptunes (which we define as objects with mass greater than that of Neptune, and smaller than halfway between that of Neptune and Saturn, i.e. 0.054 MJ<Mp<0.18 MJ).
  • We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b by the HATNet survey, an inflated hot Jupiter transiting a bright F type star in Field 0 of NASA's K2 mission. We combine ground-based discovery and follow-up light curves with high precision photometry from K2, as well as ground-based radial velocities from TRES on the FLWO 1.5m telescope to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass of $2.18 M_J$, radius of $1.47 R_J$, and transits its host star on a near-grazing orbit with a period of 2.7908 d. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among the largest known for a planet with $M_p > 2 M_J$. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 10.9, mass of 1.30 $M_\odot$, and radius of 1.43 $R_\odot$. The periodogram of the K2 light curve suggests the star is a $\gamma$ Dor variable. HAT-P-56b is an example of a ground-based discovery of a transiting planet, where space-based observations greatly improve the confidence in the confirmation of its planetary nature, and also improve the accuracy of the planetary parameters.
  • HATS-8b is a low density transiting super-Neptune discovered as part of the HATSouth project. The planet orbits its solar-like G dwarf host (V=14.03 $\pm$ 0.10 and T$_{eff}$ =5679 $\pm$ 50 K) with a period of 3.5839 d. HATS-8b is the third lowest mass transiting exoplanet to be discovered from a wide-field ground based search, and with a mass of 0.138 $\pm$ 0.019 M$_J$ it is approximately half-way between the masses of Neptune and Saturn. However HATS-8b has a radius of 0.873 (+0.123,-0.075) R$_J$, resulting in a bulk density of just 0.259 $\pm$ 0.091 g.cm$^{-3}$. The metallicity of the host star is super-Solar ([Fe/H]=0.210 $\pm$ 0.080), arguing against the idea that low density exoplanets form from metal-poor environments. The low density and large radius of HATS-8b results in an atmospheric scale height of almost 1000 km, and in addition to this there is an excellent reference star of near equal magnitude at just 19 arcsecond separation on the sky. These factors make HATS-8b an exciting target for future atmospheric characterization studies, particularly for long-slit transmission spectroscopy.
  • We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the HATSouth survey. HATS-9b orbits an old (10.8 $\pm$ 1.5 Gyr) V=13.3 G dwarf star, with a period P = 1.9153 d. The host star has a mass of 1.03 M$_{\odot}$, radius of 1.503 R$_\odot$ and effective temperature 5366 $\pm$ 70 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.837 M$_J$, and radius of 1.065 R$_J$ yielding a mean density of 0.85 g cm$^{-3}$ . HATS-10b orbits a V=13.1 G dwarf star, with a period P = 3.3128 d. The host star has a mass of 1.1 M$_\odot$, radius of 1.11 R$_\odot$ and effective temperature 5880 $\pm$ 120 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.53 M$_J$, and radius of 0.97 R$_J$ yielding a mean density of 0.7 g cm$^{-3}$ . Both planets are compact in comparison with planets receiving similar irradiation from their host stars, and lie in the nominal coordinates of Field 7 of K2 but only HATS-9b falls on working silicon. Future characterisation of HATS-9b with the exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler telescope may provide measurements of its reflected light signature.
  • We report the discovery and characterisation of a new M-dwarf binary, with component masses and radii of M1 = 0.244 -0.003/+0.003 Msun, R1 = 0.261 -0.009/+0.006 Rsun, M2 = 0.179 -0.001/+0.002 Msun, R2 = 0.218 -0.011/+0.007 Rsun, and orbital period of ~4.1 days. The M-dwarf binary HATS551-027 (LP 837-20) was identified as an eclipsing binary by the HATSouth survey, and characterised by a series of high precision photometric observations of the eclipse events, and spectroscopic determinations of the atmospheric parameters and radial velocity orbits. HATS551-027 is one of few systems with both stellar components lying in the fully-convective regime of very low mass stars, and can serve as a test for stellar interior models. The radius of HATS551-027A is consistent with models to 1 sigma, whilst HATS551-027B is inflated by 9% at 2 sigma significance. We measure the effective temperatures for the two stellar components to be Teff,1 = 3190 +/- 100 K and Teff,2 = 2990+/-110 K, both are slightly cooler than theoretical models predict, but consistent with other M-dwarfs of similar masses that have previously been studied. We also measure significant Halpha emission from both components of the binary system, and discuss this in the context of the correlation between stellar activity and the discrepancies between the observed and model temperatures.
  • We report the discovery of HATS-13b and HATS-14b, two hot-Jupiter transiting planets discovered by the HATSouth survey. The host stars are quite similar to each other (HATS-13: V = 13.9 mag, M* = 0.96 Msun, R* = 0.89 Rsun, Teff = 5500 K, [Fe/H] = 0.05; HATS-14: V = 13.8 mag, M* = 0.97 Msun, R* = 0.93 Rsun, Teff = 5350 K, [Fe/H] = 0.33) and both the planets orbit around them with a period of roughly 3 days and a separation of roughly 0.04 au. However, even though they are irradiated in a similar way, the physical characteristics of the two planets are very different. HATS-13b, with a mass of Mp = 0.543 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.212 RJ, appears as an inflated planet, while HATS-14b, having a mass of Mp = 1.071 MJ and a radius of Rp = 1.039 RJ, is only slightly larger in radius than Jupiter.
  • We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-6b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V=15.2 mag, i=13.7 mag M1V star with a mass of 0.57 Msun and a radius of 0.57 Rsun. HATS-6b has a period of P = 3.3253 d, mass of Mp=0.32 Mjup, radius of Rp=1.00 Rjup, and zero-albedo equilibrium temperature of Teq=712.8+-5.1 K. HATS-6 is one of the lowest mass stars known to host a close-in gas giant planet, and its transits are among the deepest of any known transiting planet system. We discuss the follow-up opportunities afforded by this system, noting that despite the faintness of the host star, it is expected to have the highest K-band S/N transmission spectrum among known gas giant planets with Teq < 750 K. In order to characterize the star we present a new set of empirical relations between the density, radius, mass, bolometric magnitude, and V, J, H and K-band bolometric corrections for main sequence stars with M < 0.80 Msun, or spectral types later than K5. These relations are calibrated using eclipsing binary components as well as members of resolved binary systems. We account for intrinsic scatter in the relations in a self-consistent manner. We show that from the transit-based stellar density alone it is possible to measure the mass and radius of a ~0.6 Msun star to ~7% and ~2% precision, respectively. Incorporating additional information, such as the V-K color, or an absolute magnitude, allows the precision to be improved by up to a factor of two.
  • We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V=13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P = 2.5167 d, mass of Mp = 1.32 Mj, radius of Rp = 1.02 Rj and density of rho_p = 1.55 +- 0.16 g/cm^3 ~ 1.24 rhoj. The host star has a mass of 1.00 Msun, a radius of 0.92 Rsun and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]= 0.43 +- 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1-2 Mj and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 Mearth. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurement and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique to estimate simultaneously vsini and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.
  • We report the discovery of the transiting extrasolar planet HAT-P-49b. The planet transits the bright (V = 10.3) slightly evolved F-star HD 340099 with a mass of 1.54M_S and a radius of 1.83 R_S. HAT-P-49b is orbiting one of the 25 brightest stars to host a transiting planet which makes this a favorable candidate for detailed follow-up. This system is an especially strong target for Rossiter- McLaughlin follow-up due to the fast rotation of the host star, 16 km/s. The planetary companion has a period of 2.6915 d, mass of 1.73 M_J and radius of 1.41 R_J. The planetary characteristics are consistent with that of a classical hot Jupiter but we note that this is the fourth most massive star to host a transiting planet with both M_p and R_p well determined.
  • We report the discovery by the HATNet survey of three new transiting extrasolar planets orbiting moderately bright (V=13.2, 12.8 and 11.9) stars. The planets have orbital periods of 4.3012, 3.1290, and 4.4631 days, masses of 0.39, 0.89, and 0.49 Mjup, and radii of 1.28, 1.43, and 1.28 Rjup. The stellar hosts have masses of 0.94, 1.26, and 1.28 Msun. Each system shows significant systematic variations in its residual radial velocities indicating the possible presence of additional components. Based on its Bayesian evidence, the preferred model for HAT-P-44 consists of two planets, including the transiting component, with the outer planet having a period of 220 d and a minimum mass of 1.6 Mjup. Due to aliasing we cannot rule out an alternative solution for the outer planet having a period of 438 d and a minimum mass of 3.7 Mjup. For HAT-P-45 at present there is not enough data to justify the additional free parameters included in a multi-planet model, in this case a single-planet solution is preferred, but the required jitter of 22.5 +- 6.3 m/s is relatively high for a star of this type. For HAT-P-46 the preferred solution includes a second planet having a period of 78 d and a minimum mass of 2.0 Mjup, however the preference for this model over a single-planet model is not very strong. While substantial uncertainties remain as to the presence and/or properties of the outer planetary companions in these systems, the inner transiting planets are well characterized with measured properties that are fairly robust against changes in the assumed models for the outer planets. Continued RV monitoring is necessary to fully characterize these three planetary systems, the properties of which may have important implications for understanding the formation of hot Jupiters.
  • The small sizes of low mass stars in principle provide an opportunity to find Earth-like planets and "super-Earths" in habitable zones via transits. Large area synoptic surveys like Pan-STARRS and LSST will observe large numbers of low mass stars, albeit with widely spaced (sparse) time sampling relative to the planets' periods and transit durations. We present simple analytical equations that can be used to estimate the feasibility of a survey by setting upper limits to the number of transiting planets that will be detected. We use Monte Carlo simulations to find upper limits for the number of transiting planets that may be discovered in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep and 3-pi surveys. Our search for transiting planets and M-dwarf eclipsing binaries in the SDSS-II supernova data is used to illustrate the problems (and successes) in using sparsely sampled surveys.