• The HOSTS (Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial Systems) survey searches for dust near the habitable zones (HZs) around nearby, bright main sequence stars. We use nulling interferometry in N band to suppress the bright stellar light and to probe for low levels of HZ dust around the 30 stars observed so far. Our overall detection rate is 18%, including four new detections, among which are the first three around Sun-like stars and the first two around stars without any previously known circumstellar dust. The inferred occurrence rates are comparable for early type and Sun-like stars, but decrease from 60 (+16/-21)% for stars with previously detected cold dust to 8 (+10/-3)% for stars without such excess, confirming earlier results at higher sensitivity. For completed observations on individual stars, our sensitivity is five to ten times better than previous results. Assuming a lognormal excess luminosity function, we put upper limits on the median HZ dust level of 13 zodis (95% confidence) for a sample of stars without cold dust and of 26 zodis when focussing on Sun-like stars without cold dust. However, our data suggest that a more complex luminosity function may be more appropriate. For stars without detectable LBTI excess, our upper limits are almost reduced by a factor of two, demonstrating the strength of LBTI target vetting for future exo-Earth imaging missions. Our statistics are so far limited and extending the survey is critical to inform the design of future exo-Earth imaging surveys.
  • The search of life in the Universe is a fundamental problem of astrobiology and a major priority for NASA. A key area of major progress since the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 (NAS15) has been a shift from the exoplanet discovery phase to a phase of characterization and modeling of the physics and chemistry of exoplanetary atmospheres, and the development of observational strategies for the search for life in the Universe by combining expertise from four NASA science disciplines including heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science and Earth science. The NASA Nexus for Exoplanetary System Science (NExSS) has provided an efficient environment for such interdisciplinary studies. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles produce disturbances in interplanetary space collectively referred to as space weather, which interacts with the Earth upper atmosphere and causes dramatic impact on space and ground-based technological systems. Exoplanets within close in habitable zones around M dwarfs and other active stars are exposed to extreme ionizing radiation fluxes, thus making exoplanetary space weather (ESW) effects a crucial factor of habitability. In this paper, we describe the recent developments and provide recommendations in this interdisciplinary effort with the focus on the impacts of ESW on habitability, and the prospects for future progress in searching for signs of life in the Universe as the outcome of the NExSS workshop held in Nov 29 - Dec 2, 2016, New Orleans, LA. This is one of five Life Beyond the Solar System white papers submitted by NExSS to the National Academy of Sciences in support of the Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe.
  • Debris discs are a consequence of the planet formation process and constitute the fingerprints of planetesimal systems. Their solar system's counterparts are the asteroid and Edgeworth-Kuiper belts. The aim of this paper is to provide robust numbers for the incidence of debris discs around FGK stars in the solar neighbourhood. The full sample of 177 FGK stars with d<20 pc proposed for the DUNES survey is presented. Herschel/PACS observations at 100 and 160 micron complemented with data at 70 micron, and at 250, 350 and 500 micron SPIRE photometry, were obtained. The 123 objects observed by the DUNES collaboration were presented in a previous paper. The remaining 54 stars, shared with the DEBRIS consortium and observed by them, and the combined full sample are studied in this paper. The incidence of debris discs per spectral type is analysed and put into context together with other parameters of the sample, like metallicity, rotation and activity, and age. The subsample of 105 stars with d<15 pc containing 23 F, 33 G and 49 K stars, is complete for F stars, almost complete for G stars and contains a substantial number of K stars to draw solid conclusions on objects of this spectral type. The incidence rates of debris discs per spectral type 0.26 (6 objects with excesses out of 23 F stars), 0.21 (7 out of 33 G stars) and 0.20 (10 out of 49 K stars), the fraction for all three spectral types together being 0.22 (23 out of 105 stars). Uncertainties corresponding to a 95% confidence level are given in the text for all these numbers. The medians of the upper limits of L_dust/L_* for each spectral type are 7.8E-7 (F), 1.4E-6 (G) and 2.2E-6 (K); the lowest values being around 4.0E-7. The incidence of debris discs is similar for active (young) and inactive (old) stars. The fractional luminosity tends to drop with increasing age, as expected from collisional erosion of the debris belts.
  • The Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer is a NASA-funded nulling and imaging instrument designed to coherently combine the two 8.4-m primary mirrors of the LBT for high-sensitivity, high-contrast, and high-resolution infrared imaging (1.5-13 um). PHASECam is LBTI's near-infrared camera used to measure tip-tilt and phase variations between the two AO-corrected apertures and provide high-angular resolution observations. We report on the status of the system and describe its on-sky performance measured during the first semester of 2014. With a spatial resolution equivalent to that of a 22.8-meter telescope and the light-gathering power of single 11.8-meter mirror, the co-phased LBT can be considered to be a forerunner of the next-generation extremely large telescopes (ELT).
  • We report on the first nulling interferometric observations with the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI), resolving the N' band (9.81 - 12.41 um) emission around the nearby main-sequence star eta Crv (F2V, 1-2 Gyr). The measured source null depth amounts to 4.40% +/- 0.35% over a field-of-view of 140 mas in radius (~2.6\,AU at the distance of eta Corvi) and shows no significant variation over 35{\deg} of sky rotation. This relatively low null is unexpected given the total disk to star flux ratio measured by Spitzer/IRS (~23% across the N' band), suggesting that a significant fraction of the dust lies within the central nulled response of the LBTI (79 mas or 1.4 AU). Modeling of the warm disk shows that it cannot resemble a scaled version of the Solar zodiacal cloud, unless it is almost perpendicular to the outer disk imaged by Herschel. It is more likely that the inner and outer disks are coplanar and the warm dust is located at a distance of 0.5-1.0 AU, significantly closer than previously predicted by models of the IRS spectrum (~3 AU). The predicted disk sizes can be reconciled if the warm disk is not centrosymmetric, or if the dust particles are dominated by very small grains. Both possibilities hint that a recent collision has produced much of the dust. Finally, we discuss the implications for the presence of dust at the distance where the insolation is the same as Earth's (2.3 AU).
  • J. Wiegert, A. Mora, D. Ardila, W. C. Danchi, M. Hajigholi, G. J. White Department of Earth, Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, Observatoire de Paris, Laboratoire d'études spatiales et d'instrumentation en astrophysique, France, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Sweden, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, USA, Departamento de Física Teórica, C-XI, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, Departamento de Astrofísica, Centro de Astrobiología NASA Herschel Science Center, Infrared Processing, Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, European Space Astronomy Centre UJF-Grenoble 1, CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble, France, Max Planck Institut für Astronomie, Germany, Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, USA, Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica Institute of planetary Research, German Aerospace Center, Germany, Leiden Observatory, University of Leiden, The Netherlands, Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitätssternwarte, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Germany, Astrophysics Mission Division, Research, Scientific Support Department ESA, The Netherlands, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets, Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, USA, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, The Open University UK, Space Science & Technology Department, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Astrophysics, University of Kiel)
    Jan. 28, 2014 astro-ph.SR
    [Abridged] Debris discs around main-sequence stars indicate the presence of larger rocky bodies. The components of the nearby binary aCentauri have higher than solar metallicities, which is thought to promote giant planet formation. We aim to determine the level of emission from debris in the aCen system. Having already detected the temperature minimum, Tmin, of aCenA, we here attempt to do so also for the companion aCenB. Using the aCen stars as templates, we study possible effects Tmin may have on the detectability of unresolved dust discs around other stars. We use Herschel and APEX photometry to determine the stellar spectral energy distributions. In addition, we use APEX for spectral line mapping to study the complex background around aCen seen in the photometric images. Models of stellar atmospheres and discs are used to estimate the amount of debris around these stars. For solar-type stars, a fractional dust luminosity fd 2e-7 could account for SEDs that do not exhibit the Tmin-effect. Slight excesses at the 2.5 sigma level are observed at 24 mu for both stars, which, if interpreted to be due to dust, would correspond to fd (1-3)e-5. Dynamical disc modelling leads to rough mass estimates of the putative Zodi belts around the aCen stars, viz. <~4e-6 MMoon of 4 to 1000 mu size grains, distributed according to n a^-3.5. Similarly, for filled-in Tmin emission, corresponding EKBs could account for ~1e-3 MMoon of dust. Light scattered and/or thermally emitted by exo-Zodi discs will have profound implications for future spectroscopic missions designed to search for biomarkers in the atmospheres of Earth-like planets. The F-IR SED of aCenB is marginally consistent with the presence of a minimum temperature region in the upper atmosphere. We also show that an aCenA-like temperature minimum may result in an erroneous apprehension about the presence of dust around other stars.
  • We present the first N-band nulling plus K- and L-band V2 observations of a young stellar object, MWC325, taken with the 85 m baseline Keck Interferometer. The Keck nuller was designed for the study of faint dust signatures associated with debris disks, but it also has a unique capability for studying the temperature and density distribution of denser disks found around young stellar objects. Interferometric observations of MWC 325 at K, L and N encompass a factor of five in spectral range and thus, especially when spectrally dispersed within each band, enable characterization of the structure of the inner disk regions where planets form. Fitting our observations with geometric models such as a uniform disk or a Gaussian disk show that the apparent size increases monotonically with wavelength in the 2-12 um wavelength region, confirming the widely held assumption based on radiative transfer models, now with spatially resolved measurements over broad wavelength range, that disks are extended with a temperature gradient. The effective size is a factor of about 1.3 and 2 larger in the L-band and N-band, respectively, compared to that in the K-band. The existing interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution can be reproduced by a flat disk or a weakly-shadowed nearly flat-disk model, with only slight flaring in the outer regions of the disk, consisting of representative "sub-micron" (0.1 um) and "micron" (2 um) grains of a 50:50 ratio of silicate and graphite. This is marked contrast with the disks previously found in other Herbig Ae/Be stars suggesting a wide variety in the disk properties among Herbig Ae/Be stars.
  • The Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN) was used to survey 25 nearby main sequence stars in the mid-infrared, in order to assess the prevalence of warm circumstellar (exozodiacal) dust around nearby solar-type stars. The KIN measures circumstellar emission by spatially blocking the star but transmitting the circumstellar flux in a region typically 0.1 - 4 AU from the star. We find one significant detection (eta Crv), two marginal detections (gamma Oph and alpha Aql), and 22 clear non-detections. Using a model of our own Solar System's zodiacal cloud, scaled to the luminosity of each target star, we estimate the equivalent number of target zodis needed to match our observations. Our three zodi detections are eta Crv (1250 +/- 260), gamma Oph (200 +/- 80) and alpha Aql (600 +/- 200), where the uncertainties are 1-sigma. The 22 non-detected targets have an ensemble weighted average consistent with zero, with an average individual uncertainty of 160 zodis (1-sigma). These measurements represent the best limits to date on exozodi levels for a sample of nearby main sequence stars. A statistical analysis of the population of 23 stars not previously known to contain circumstellar dust (excluding eta Crv and gamma Oph) suggests that, if the measurement errors are uncorrelated (for which we provide evidence) and if these 23 stars are representative of a single class with respect to the level of exozodi brightness, the mean exozodi level for the class is <150 zodis (3-sigma upper-limit, corresponding to 99% confidence under the additional assumption that the measurement errors are Gaussian). We also demonstrate that this conclusion is largely independent of the shape and mean level of the (unknown) true underlying exozodi distribution.
  • When observing an extrasolar planetary system, the most luminous component after the star itself is generally the light scattered and/or thermally emitted by a population of micron-sized dust grains. These grains are expected to be continuously replenished by the collisions and evaporation of larger bodies just as in our solar zodiacal cloud. Exozodiacal clouds ("exozodis") must therefore be seriously taken into account when attempting to directly image faint Earth-like planets (exoEarths, for short). This paper summarizes the oral contributions and discussions that took place during the Satellite Meeting on exozodiacal dust disks, in an attempt to address the following two questions: Do we need to solve the exozodi question? If yes, how to best solve it?
  • About two dozen exo-solar debris systems have been spatially resolved. These debris discs commonly display a variety of structural features such as clumps, rings, belts, eccentric distributions and spiral patterns. In most cases, these features are believed to be formed, shaped and maintained by the dynamical influence of planets orbiting the host stars. In very few cases has the presence of the dynamically important planet(s) been inferred from direct observation. The solar-type star q1 Eri is known to be surrounded by debris, extended on scales of < 30''. The star is known to host at least one planet, albeit on an orbit far too small to make it responsible for structures at distances of tens to hundreds of AU. The aim of the present investigation is twofold: to determine the optical and material properties of the debris and to infer the spatial distribution of the dust, which may hint at the presence of additional planets. The photodetector array camera and spectrometer (PACS) aboard the Herschel Space Observatory allows imaging observations in the far infrared at unprecedented resolution, i.e. at better than 6'' to 12'' over the wavelength range of 60 {\mu}m to 210 {\mu}m. Together with the results from ground-based observations, these spatially resolved data can be modelled to determine the nature of the debris and its evolution more reliably than would be possible from unresolved data alone. For the first time has the q1 Eri disc been resolved at far infrared wavelengths. The PACS observations at 70, 100 and 160 {\mu}m reveal an oval image showing a disc-like structure in all bands, the size of which increases with wavelength. Assuming a circular shape yields the inclination of its equatorial plane with respect to that of the sky, i > 53deg. The results of image de-convolution indicate that i likely is larger than 63deg, where 90deg corresponds to an edge-on disc. {abridged}
  • The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) is a mission concept for a nulling interferometer for the near-to-mid-infrared spectral region. FKSI is conceived as a mid-sized strategic or Probe class mission. FKSI has been endorsed by the Exoplanet Community Forum 2008 as such a mission and has been costed to be within the expected budget. The current design of FKSI is a two-element nulling interferometer. The two telescopes, separated by 12.5 m, are precisely pointed (by small steering mirrors) on the target star. The two path lengths are accurately controlled to be the same to within a few nanometers. A phase shifter/beam combiner (Mach-Zehnder interferometer) produces an output beam consisting of the nulled sum of the target planet's light and the host star's light. When properly oriented, the starlight is nulled by a factor of 10^-4, and the planet light is undiminished. Accurate modeling of the signal is used to subtract the residual starlight, permitting the detection of planets much fainter than the host star. The current version of FKSI with 0.5-m apertures and waveband 3-8 microns has the following main capabilities: (1) detect exozodiacal emission levels to that of our own solar system (1 Solar System Zodi) around nearby F, G, and K, stars; (2) characterize spectroscopically the atmospheres of a large number of known non-transiting planets; (3) survey and characterize nearby stars for planets down to 2 Earth radii from just inside the habitable zone and inward. An enhanced version of FKSI with 1-m apertures separated by 20 m and cooled to 40 K, with science waveband 5-15 microns, allows for the detection and characterization of 2 Earth-radius super-Earths and smaller planets in the habitable zone around stars within about 30 pc.
  • We present spatially-resolved K- and L-band spectra (at spectral resolution R = 230 and R = 60, respectively) of MWC 419, a Herbig Ae/Be star. The data were obtained simultaneously with a new configuration of the 85-m baseline Keck Interferometer. Our observations are sensitive to the radial distribution of temperature in the inner region of the disk of MWC 419. We fit the visibility data with both simple geometric and more physical disk models. The geometric models (uniform disk and Gaussian) show that the apparent size increases linearly with wavelength in the 2-4 microns wavelength region, suggesting that the disk is extended with a temperature gradient. A model having a power-law temperature gradient with radius simultaneously fits our interferometric measurements and the spectral energy distribution data from the literature. The slope of the power-law is close to that expected from an optically thick disk. Our spectrally dispersed interferometric measurements include the Br gamma emission line. The measured disk size at and around Br gamma suggests that emitting hydrogen gas is located inside (or within the inner regions) of the dust disk.
  • We present results from a spectro-interferometric study of the Miras o Cet, R Leo and W Hya obtained with the Keck Aperture Masking Experiment from 1998 Sep to 2002 Jul. The spectrally dispersed visibility data permit fitting with circularly symmetric brightness profiles such as a simple uniform disk. The stellar angular diameter obtained over up to ~ 450 spectral channels spaning the region 1.1-3.8 microns is presented. Use of a simple uniform disk brightness model facilitates comparison between epochs and with existing data and theoretical models. Strong size variations with wavelength were recorded for all stars, probing zones of H2O, CO, OH, and dust formation. Comparison with contemporaneous spectra extracted from our data show a strong anti-correlation between the observed angular diameter and flux. These variations consolidate the notion of a complex stellar atmosphere consisting of molecular shells with time-dependent densities and temperatures. Our findings are compared with existing data and pulsation models. The models were found to reproduce the functional form of the wavelength vs. angular diameter curve well, although some departures are noted in the 2.8-3.5 micron range.
  • We report observations of the nova RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph) using the Keck Interferometer Nuller (KIN), approximately 3.8 days following the most recent outburst that occurred on 2006 February 12. These observations represent the first scientific results from the KIN, which operates in N-band from 8 to 12.5 microns in a nulling mode. By fitting the unique KIN data, we have obtained an angular size of the mid-infrared continuum of 6.2, 4.0, or 5.4 mas for a disk profile, gaussian profile (FWHM), and shell profile respectively. The data show evidence of enhanced neutral atomic hydrogen emission and atomic metals including silicon located in the inner spatial regime near the white dwarf (WD) relative to the outer regime. There are also nebular emission lines and evidence of hot silicate dust in the outer spatial region, centered at ! 17 AU from the WD, that are not found in the inner regime. Our evidence suggests that these features have been excited by the nova flash in the outer spatial regime before the blast wave reached these regions. These identifications support a model in which the dust appears to be present between outbursts and is not created during the outburst event. We further discuss the present results in terms of a unifying model of the system that includes an increase in density in the plane of the orbit of the two stars created by a spiral shock wave caused by the motion of the stars through the cool wind of the red giant star. These data show the power and potential of the nulling technique which has been developed for the detection of Earth-like planets around nearby stars for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission and Darwin missions.
  • We report imaging observations of the symbotic long-period Mira variable R Aquarii (R Aqr) at near-infrared and radio wavelengths. The near-infrared observations were made with the IOTA imaging interferometer in three narrow-band filters centered at 1.51, 1.64, and 1.78 $\mu$m, which sample mainly water, continuum, and water features, respectively. Our near-infrared fringe visibility and closure phase data are analyzed using three models. (a) A uniform disk model with wavelength-dependent sizes fails to fit the visibility data, and is inconsistent with the closure phase data. (b) A three- component model, comprising a Mira star, water shell, and an off-axis point source, provide a good fit to all data. (c) A model generated by a constrained image reconstruction analysis provides more insight, suggesting that the water shell is highly non-uniform, i.e., clumpy. The VLBA observations of SiO masers in the outer molecular envelope show evidence of turbulence, with jet-like features containing velocity gradients.
  • The angular diameters of six oxygen rich Mira-type long-period variables have been measured at various near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths using the aperture masking technique in an extensive observing program from 1997 Jan to 2004 Sep. These data sets span many pulsation cycles of the observed objects and represent the largest study of multi-wavelength, multi-epoch interferometric angular diameter measurements on Mira stars to date. The calibrated visibility data of o Cet, R Leo, R Cas, W Hya, chi Cyg and R Hya are fitted using a uniform disk brightness distribution model to facilitate comparison between epochs, wavelengths and with existing data and theoretical models. The variation of angular diameter as a function of wavelength and time are studied, and cyclic diameter variations are detected for all objects in our sample. These variations are believed to stem from time-dependent changes of density and temperature (and hence varying molecular opacities) in different layers of these stars. The similarities and differences in behaviour between these objects are analyzed and discussed in the context of existing theoretical models. Furthermore, we present time-dependent 3.08 micron angular diameter measurements, probing for the first time these zones of probable dust formation, which show unforeseen sizes and are consistently out of phase with other NIR layers shown in this study. The S-type Mira chi Cyg exhibits significantly different behaviour compared to the M-type Miras in this study.
  • We have measured non-zero closure phases for about 29% of our sample of 56 nearby Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, using the 3-telescope Infrared Optical Telescope Array (IOTA) interferometer at near-infrared wavelengths (H band) and with angular resolutions in the range 5-10 milliarcseconds. These nonzero closure phases can only be generated by asymmetric brightness distributions of the target stars or their surroundings. We discuss how these results were obtained, and how they might be interpreted in terms of structures on or near the target stars. We also report measured angular sizes and hypothesize that most Mira stars would show detectable asymmetry if observed with adequate angular resolution.
  • We discuss the theory of the Bracewell nulling interferometer and explicitly demonstrate that the phase of the "white light" null fringe is the same as the phase of the bright output from an ordinary stellar interferometer. As a consequence a "closure phase" exists for a nulling interferometer with three or more telescopes. We calculate the phase offset as a function of baseline length for an Earth-like planet around the Sun at 10 pc, with a contrast ratio of $10^{-6}$ at 10 $\mu$m. The magnitude of the phase due to the planet is $\sim 10^{-6}$ radians, assuming the star is at the phase center of the array. Although this is small, this phase may be observable in a three-telescope nulling interferometer that measures the closure phase. We propose a simple non-redundant three-telescope nulling interferometer that can perform this measurement. This configuration is expected to have improved characteristics compared to other nulling interferometer concepts, such as a relaxation of pathlength tolerances, through the use of the "ratio of wavelengths" technique, a closure phase, and better discrimination between exodiacal dust and planets.
  • High angular resolution images of IRC +10216 taken at various bandpasses within the near-infrared h, k & l bands are presented. The maps have the highest angular resolution yet recovered, and were reconstructed from interferometric measurements obtained at the Keck 1 telescope in 1997 December and 1998 April, forming a subset of a 7-epoch monitoring program presented earlier [paper 1]. Systematic changes with observing wavelength are found and discussed in context of present geometrical models for the circumstellar envelope. With these new high-resolution, multi-wavelength data and contemporaneous photometry, we also re-visit the hypothesis that the bright compact Core of the nebula (component `A') marks the location of the central carbon star. We find that directly measured properties of the Core (angular size, flux density, color temperature) are consistent with a reddened carbon star photosphere (line-of-sight tau=5.3).
  • Observations at mid-infrared (4.8-17.65 um) and radio (0.7-1.3 cm) wavelengths are used to constrain the structure of the high-mass star-forming region W3 IRS5 on 0.1'' (200 AU) scales. Two bright mid-infrared sources are detected, as well as diffuse emission. The bright sources have associated compact radio emission and probably are young high-mass stars. The measured sizes and estimated temperatures indicate that these sources together can supply the observed far-infrared luminosity. However, an optically thick radio source with a possible mid-infrared counterpart may also contribute significant luminosity; if so, it must be extremely deeply embedded. The infrared colour temperatures of 350-390 K and low radio brightness suggest gravitational confinement of the H II regions and ongoing accretion at a rate of a few 10^-8 M0/yr or more. Variations in the accretion rate would explain the observed radio variability. The low estimated foreground extinction suggests the existence of a cavity around the central stars, perhaps blown by stellar winds. At least three radio sources without mid-infrared counterparts appear to show proper motions of ~100 km/s, and may be deeply embedded young runaway OB stars, but more likely are clumps in the ambient material which are shock-ionized by the OB star winds.
  • We present Keck LWS images of the Orion BN/KL star forming region obtained in the first multi-wavelength study to have 0.3-0.5" resolution from 4.7 to 22 microns. The young stellar objects designated infrared source-n and radio source-I are believed to dominate the BN/KL region. We have detected extended emission from a probable accretion disk around source-n but infer a stellar luminosity on the order of only 2000 Lsun. Although source-I is believed to be more luminous, we do not detect an infrared counterpart even at the longest wavelengths. However, we resolve the closeby infrared source, IRc2, into an arc of knots ~1000 AU long at all wavelengths. Although the physical relation of source-I to IRc2 remains ambiguous, we suggest these sources mark a high density core (10^7-10^8 pc^-3 over 1000 AU) within the larger BN/KL star forming cluster. The high density may be a consequence of the core being young and heavily embedded. We suggest the energetics of the BN/KL region may be dominated by this cluster core rather than one or two individual sources.
  • The results of a 7-epoch interferometric imaging study, at wavelengths in the near-infrared K-band, of the carbon star IRC +10216 are presented. The use of non- and partially-redundant aperture masking techniques on the 10-m Keck-I telescope has allowed us to produce images of the innermost regions of the circumstellar dust envelope with unprecedented detail. With roughly twice the resolving power of previous work, the complex asymmetric structures reported within the central 0.5 arcsec (20 stellar radii) have been imaged at the size scale of the stellar disk itself (about 50 mas). A prominent dark lane at a position angle of approximately 120 deg is suggested to be an optically thick disk or torus of dust which could help to explain IRC +10216's well-known bipolarity at a position angle of 20 deg. Observations spanning more than a pulsational cycle (638 days) have revealed significant temporal evolution of the nebula, including the outward motion of bright knots and clumps. Registering these displacements against the compact bright core, which we tentatively identify as marking the location of the star, has allowed us to determine the apparent angular velocity at a number of points. The magnitudes of the proper motions were found to be in agreement with current estimates of the stellar distance and radial velocity. Higher outflow speeds were found for features with greater separation from the core. This is consistent with acceleration taking place over the region sampled by the measurements, however alternate interpretations are also presented. Although a number of changes of morphology were found, none were clearly interpreted as the condensation of new dust over the pulsation cycle.
  • We report the first use of Michelson interferometry on the Keck I telescope for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared JHK and L bands. By using an aperture mask located close to the f/25 secondary, the 10 m Keck primary mirror was transformed into a separate-element, multiple aperture interferometer. This has allowed diffraction-limited imaging of a large number of bright astrophysical targets, including the geometrically complex dust envelopes around a number of evolved stars. The successful restoration of these images, with dynamic ranges in excess of 200:1, highlights the significant capabilities of sparse aperture imaging as compared with more conventional filled-pupil speckle imaging for the class of bright targets considered here. In particular the enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio of the Fourier data, precipitated by the reduction in atmospheric noise, allows high fidelity imaging of complex sources with small numbers of short-exposure images relative to speckle. Multi-epoch measurements confirm the reliability of this imaging technique and our whole dataset provides a powerful demonstration of the capabilities of aperture masking methods when utilized with the current generation of large-aperture telescopes. The relationship between these new results and recent advances in interferometry and adaptive optics is briefly discussed.
  • Recent ground-based mid-infrared spectra of 29 late-type stars, most with substantial dust shells, are compared to ground-based spectra of these stars from the 1960s and 1970s and to IRAS-LRS spectra obtained in 1983. The spectra of about half the stars show no detectable changes, implying that their distributions of circumstellar material and associated dust grain properties have changed little over this time interval. However, many of the stars with strong silicate features showed marked changes. In nearly all cases the silicate peak has strengthened with respect to the underlying continuum, although there is one case (VY~CMa) in which the silicate feature has almost completely disappeared. This suggests that, in general, an oxygen-rich star experiences long periods of gradual silicate feature strengthening, punctuated by relatively rare periods when the feature weakens. We discuss various mechanisms for producing the changes, favoring the slow evolution of the intrinsic dust properties (i.e., the chemical composition or grain structure). Although most IRAS spectra agree well with ground-based spectra, there are a number of cases where they fall well outside the expected range of uncertainty. In almost all such cases the slopes of the red and blue LRS spectra do not match in their region of overlap.
  • New multi-epoch, mid-infrared (8-13 microns) spectrophotometric observations are presented for 30~late-type stars. The observations were collected over a four year period (1994-1997), permitting an investigation of the mid-infrared spectral shape as a function of the pulsation cycle (typically 1-2 years). The spectra of stars with little excess infrared emission and those with carbon-rich dust show the least spectral variability, while stars with evidence for dusty, oxygen-rich envelopes are most likely to show discernible variations in their spectral profile. Most significantly, a large fraction of variable stars with strong 9.7 micron emission features show clear spectral profile changes which repeat from one cycle to the next. The significant sharpening of the silicate feature near maximum light can not be fully explained by heating and cooling of the circumstellar dust shell during the pulsational cycle, suggesting that the dust optical properties themselves must also be varying. In addition, the appearance of a narrow emission feature near the silicate peak for a few stars may require the production of especially ``pure'' silicate dust near maximum light. The general narrowing of the silicate feature observed may reflect the evolution of the pre-existing dirty grains whose surface impurities have been evaporated off when the grain temperature rises preceding maximum light. An improved theory of dust formation which can explain the observed changes in the grain properties around a single, pulsating star may lead to a definitive explanation for the diversity of silicate emission profiles observed amongst oxygen-rich, late-type stars.