• We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) 5-7.5 micron spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 microns due to the nu_2 = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures > 500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other six of the thirteen stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 microns, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H2CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.
  • We report on the {\lambda} = 5-36{\mu}m Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 79 young stellar objects in the very young nearby cluster NGC 1333. NGC 1333's youth enables the study of early protoplanetary disk properties, such as the degree of settling as well as the formation of gaps and clearings. We construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using our IRS data as well as published photometry and classify our sample into SED classes. Using "extinction-free" spectral indices, we determine whether the disk, envelope, or photosphere dominates the spectrum. We analyze the dereddened spectra of objects which show disk dominated emission using spectral indices and properties of silicate features in order to study the vertical and radial structure of protoplanetary disks in NGC 1333. At least nine objects in our sample of NGC 1333 show signs of large (several AU) radial gaps or clearings in their inner disk. Disks with radial gaps in NGC 1333 show more-nearly pristine silicate dust than their radially continuous counterparts. We compare properties of disks in NGC 1333 to those in three other well studied regions, Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus and Chamaeleon I, and find no difference in their degree of sedimentation and dust processing.
  • We present results from two mid-infrared imaging programs of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and fine-structure elliptical galaxies. The former are known to nearly all be recent mergers between two gas-rich spiral galaxies, while the latter are also believed to be even more aged merger remnants. An examination of these two classes of objects, which may represent different stages of the same putative merger sequence, should reveal similarities in the distribution of their stellar populations and dust content consistent with that expected for time-evolution of the merger. The data reveal for the first time extended dust emission in the ULIRG galaxy bodies and along their tidal features. However, contrary to expectation, we find that the vast majority of the fine-structure elliptical galaxies lack such structured emission. This likely results from the optical selection of the elliptical sample, resulting in a population that reflects the IR-activity (or lack thereof) of optically selected interacting galaxies. Alternately, this may reflect an evolutionary process in the distribution of the dust content of the galaxy bodies.
  • We have observed 14 nearby (z<0.16) Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) with Spitzer at 3.6-24 microns. The underlying host galaxies are well-detected, in addition to the luminous nuclear cores. While the spatial resolution of Spitzer is poor, the great sensitivity of the data reveals the underlying galaxy merger remnant, and provides the first look at off-nuclear mid-infrared activity.