• The paradigm of graphene transistors is based on the gate modulation of the channel carrier density by means of a local channel gate. This standard architecture is subject to the scaling limit of the channel length and further restrictions due to access and contact resistances impeding the device performance. We propose a novel design, overcoming these issues by implementing additional local gates underneath the contact region which allow a full control of the Klein barrier taking place at the contact edge. In particular, our work demonstrates the GHz operation of transistors driven by independent contact gates. We benchmark the standard channel and novel contact gating and report for the later dynamical transconductance levels at the state of the art. Our finding may find applications in electronics and optoelectronics whenever there is need to control independently the Fermi level and the electrostatic potential of electronic sources or to get rid of cumbersome local channel gates.
  • Engineering of cooling mechanisms is a bottleneck in nanoelectronics. Whereas thermal exchanges in diffusive graphene are mostly driven by defect assisted acoustic phonon scattering, the case of high-mobility graphene on hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) is radically different with a prominent contribution of remote phonons from the substrate. A bi-layer graphene on hBN transistor with local gate is driven in a regime where almost perfect current saturation is achieved by compensation of the decrease of the carrier density and Zener-Klein tunneling (ZKT) at high bias. Using noise thermometry, we show that this Zener-Klein tunneling triggers a new cooling pathway due to the emission of hyperbolic phonon polaritons (HPP) in hBN by out-of-equilibrium electron-hole pairs beyond the super-Planckian regime. The combination of ZKT-transport and HPP-cooling promotes graphene on BN transistors as a valuable nanotechnology for power devices and RF electronics.
  • A general feature of unconventional superconductors is the existence of a superconducting dome in the phase diagram as a function of carrier concentration. For the simplest iron-based superconductor FeSe (with transition temperature Tc ~ 8 K), its Tc can be greatly enhanced by doping electrons via many routes, even up to 65 K in monolayer FeSe/SiTiO3. However, a clear phase diagram with carrier concentration for FeSe-derived superconductors is still lacking. Here, we report the observation of a series of discrete superconducting phases in FeSe thin flakes by continuously tuning carrier concentration through the intercalation of Li and Na ions with a solid ionic gating technique. Such discrete superconducting phases are robust against the substitution of Se by 20% S, but are vulnerable to the substitution of Fe by 2% Cu, highlighting the importance of the iron site being intact. A complete superconducting phase diagram for FeSe-derivatives is given, which is distinct from other unconventional superconductors.
  • We investigate theoretically the effects of modulated periodic perpendicular magnetic fields on the electronic states and optical absorption spectrum in a monolayer black phosphorus (phosphorene). We demonstrate that different phosphorene magnetic superlattice (PMS) orientations can give rise to distinct energy spectra, i.e., tuning the intrinsic electronic anisotropy. The Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC) will develop a spin-splitting energy dispersion in this phosphorene magnetic supperlattice. Anisotropic momentum-dependent carrier distributions along/perpendicular to the magnetic strips are demonstrated, and the manipulations of these exotic properties by tuning superlattice geometry, magnetic field and the RSOC term (via an external electric field) are addressed systematically. Accordingly, we find bright-to-dark transitions in the ground state electron-hole pairs transition rate spectrum and PMS orientation dependent anisotropic optical absorption spectrum. This feature offers us a practical way to modulate the electronic anisotropy in phosphorene by magnetic superlattice configurations and detect these modulation capability by using the optical technique.
  • This work investigates the high-pressure structure of freestanding superconducting ($T_{c}$ = 4.3\,K) boron doped diamond (BDD) and how it affects the electronic and vibrational properties using Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction in the 0-30\,GPa range. High-pressure Raman scattering experiments revealed an abrupt change in the linear pressure coefficients and the grain boundary components undergo an irreversible phase change at 14\,GPa. We show that the blue shift in the pressure-dependent vibrational modes correlates with the negative pressure coefficient of $T_{c}$ in BDD. The analysis of x-ray diffraction data determines the equation of state of the BDD film, revealing a high bulk modulus of $B_{0}$=510$\pm$28\,GPa. The comparative analysis of high-pressure data clarified that the sp$^{2}$ carbons in the grain boundaries transform into hexagonal diamond.
  • Squeezed-state interferometry plays an important role in quantum-enhanced optical phase estimation, as it allows the estimation precision to be improved up to the Heisenberg limit by using ideal photon-number-resolving detectors at the output ports. Here we show that for each individual $N$-photon component of the phase-matched coherent $\otimes$ squeezed vacuum input state, the classical Fisher information always saturates the quantum Fisher information. Moreover, the total Fisher information is the sum of the contributions from each individual $N$-photon components, where the largest $N$ is limited by the finite number resolution of available photon counters. Based on this observation, we provide an approximate analytical formula that quantifies the amount of lost information due to the finite photon number resolution, e.g., given the mean photon number $\bar{n}$ in the input state, over $96$ percent of the Heisenberg limit can be achieved with the number resolution larger than $5\bar{n}$.
  • Polarized light microscopy using path-entangled $N$-photon states (i.e., the N00N states) has been demonstrated to surpass the shot-noise limit at very low light illumination. However, the microscopy images suffer from divergence of phase sensitivity, which inevitably reduces the image quality. Here, we show that due to experimental imperfections, such a singularity also takes place in the microscopy that uses twin-Fock states of light for illumination. We propose two schemes to completely eliminate this singularity: (i) locking the phase shift sensed by the beams at the optimal working point, by using a spatially dependent offset phase; (ii) a combination of two binary-outcome photon counting measurements, one with a fixed offset phase and the other without any offset phase. Our observations remain valid for any kind of binary-outcome measurement and may open the way for quantum-enhanced microscopy with high $N$ photon states.
  • The precise calculations of the Wigner's d-matrix are important in various research fields. Due to the presence of large numbers, direct calculations of the matrix using the Wigner's formula suffer from loss of precision. We present a simple method to avoid this problem by expanding the d-matrix into a complex Fourier series and calculate the Fourier coefficients by exactly diagonalizing the angular-momentum operator $J_{y}$ in the eigenbasis of $J_{z}$. This method allows us to compute the d-matrix and its various derivatives for spins up to a few thousand. The precision of the d-matrix from our method is about $10^{-14}$ for spins up to $100$.
  • Optimal measurement scheme with an efficient data processing is important in quantum-enhanced interferometry. Here we prove that for a general binary outcome measurement, the simplest data processing based on inverting the average signal can saturate the Cram\'{e}r-Rao bound. This idea is illustrated by binary outcome homodyne detection, even-odd photon counting (i.e., parity detection), and zero-nonzero photon counting that have achieved super-resolved interferometric fringe and shot-noise limited sensitivity in coherent-light Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The roles of phase diffusion are investigated in these binary outcome measurements. We find that the diffusion degrades the fringe resolution and the achievable phase sensitivity. Our analytical results confirm that the zero-nonzero counting can produce a slightly better sensitivity than that of the parity detection, as demonstrated in a recent experiment.
  • The design of stacks of layered materials in which adjacent layers interact by van der Waals forces[1] has enabled the combination of various two-dimensional crystals with different electrical, optical and mechanical properties, and the emergence of novel physical phenomena and device functionality[2-8]. Here we report photo-induced doping in van der Waals heterostructures (VDHs) consisting of graphene and boron nitride layers. It enables flexible and repeatable writing and erasing of charge doping in graphene with visible light. We demonstrate that this photo-induced doping maintains the high carrier mobility of the graphene-boron nitride (G/BN) heterostructure, which resembles the modulation doping technique used in semiconductor heterojunctions, and can be used to generate spatially-varying doping profiles such as p-n junctions. We show that this photo-induced doping arises from microscopically coupled optical and electrical responses of G/BN heterostructures, which includes optical excitation of defect transitions in boron nitride, electrical transport in graphene, and charge transfer between boron nitride and graphene.
  • The single-mode Dicke model is well-known to undergo a quantum phase transition from the so-called normal phase to the supperradiant phase (hereinafter called the "superradiant quantum phase transition"). Normally, quantum phase transitions are closely related to the critical behavior of quantities such as entanglement, quantum fluctuations, and fidelity. In this paper, we study quantum Fisher information (QFI) of the field mode and that of the atoms in the ground state of the Dicke Hamiltonian. For finite and large enough number of atoms, our numerical results show that near the critical atom-field coupling, the QFIs of the atomic and the field subsystems can surpass the classical limits, due to the appearance of nonclassical squeezed states. As the coupling increases far beyond the critical point, the two subsystems are in highly mixed states, which degrade the QFI and hence the ultimate phase sensitivity. In the thermodynamic limit, we present analytical results of the QFIs and their relationships with the reduced variances. For each subsystem, we find that there is a singularity in the derivative of the QFI at the critical point, a clear signature of quantum criticality in the Dicke model.
  • We investigate the performance of entangled coherent state for quantum enhanced phase estimation. An exact analytical expression of quantum Fisher information is derived to show the role of photon losses on the ultimate phase sensitivity. We find a transition of the sensitivity from the Heisenberg scaling to the classical scaling due to quantum decoherence of the photon state. This quantum-classical transition is uniquely determined by the number of photons being lost, instead of the number of incident photons or the photon loss rate alone. Our results also reveal that a crossover of the sensitivity between the entangled coherent state and the NOON state can occur even for very small photon loss rate.
  • The evolution of electron correlation in Sr$_{x}$Ca$_{1-x}$VO$_3$ has been studied using a combination of bulk-sensitive resonant soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES), surface-sensitive photoemission spectroscopy (PES), and ab initio band structure calculations. We show that the effect of electron correlation is enhanced at the surface. Strong incoherent Hubbard subbands are found to lie ~ 20% closer in energy to the coherent quasiparticle features in surface-sensitive PES measurements compared with those from bulk-sensitive RXES, and a ~ 10% narrowing of the overall bandwidth at the surface is also observed.
  • We demonstrate the capability of accurate time transfer using optical fibers over long distances utilizing a dark fiber and hardware which is usually employed in two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT). Our time transfer through optical fiber (TTTOF) system is a variant of the standard TWSTFT by employing an optical fiber in the transmission path instead of free-space transmission of signals between two ground stations through geostationary satellites. As we use a dark fiber there are practically no limitations to the bandwidth of the transmitted signals so that we can use the highest chip-rate of the binary phase-shift modulation available from the commercial equipment. This leads to an enhanced precision compared to satellite time transfer where the occupied bandwidth is limited for cost reasons. The TTTOF system has been characterized and calibrated in a common clock experiment at PTB, and the combined calibration uncertainty is estimated as 74 ps. In a second step the remote part of the system was operated at Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institut fuer Quantenoptik (IQ) separated by 73 km from PTB in Braunschweig. In parallel, a GPS time transfer link between Braunschweig and Hannover was established, and both links connected a passive hydrogen maser at IQ with the reference time scale UTC(PTB) maintained in PTB. The results obtained with both links agree within the 1-sigma uncertainty of the GPS link results, which is estimated as 0.72 ns. The fiber link exhibits a nearly 10-fold improved stability compared to the GPS link, and assessment of its performance has been limited by the properties of the passive maser.
  • Microscopic self-propelled swimmers capable of autonomous navigation through complex environments provide appealing opportunities for localization, pick-up and delivery of micro-and nanoscopic objects. Inspired by motile cells and bacteria, man-made microswimmers have been fabricated, and their motion in patterned surroundings has been experimentally studied. We propose to use self-driven artificial microswimmers for separation of binary mixtures of colloids. We revealed different regimes of separation including one with a velocity inversion. Our finding could be of use for various biological and medical applications.
  • Let $X_t$ solve the multidimensional It\^o's stochastic differential equations on $\R^d$ $$dX_t=b(t,X_t)dt+\sigma(t,X_t)dB_t$$ where $b:[0,\infty)\times\R^d\to\R^d$ is smooth in its two arguments, $\sigma:[0,\infty)\times\R^d\to\R^d\otimes\R^d$ is smooth with $\sigma(t,x)$ being invertible for all $(t,x)\in[0,\infty)\times\R^d$, $B_t$ is $d$-dimensional Brownian motion. It is shown that, associated to a Girsanov transformation, the stochastic process $$\int^t_0\langle(\sigma^{-1}b)(s,X_s),dB_t\rangle+\frac{1}{2}\int^t_0|\sigma^{-1}b|^2(s,X_s)ds$$ is a function of the arguments $t$ and $X_t$ (i.e., path-independent) if and only if $b=\sigma\sigma^\ast\nabla v$ for some scalar function $v:[0,\infty)\times\R^d\to\R$ satisfying the time-reversed KPZ type equation $$\frac{\partial}{\partial t}v(t,x)=-\frac{1}{2}\left[\left(Tr(\sigma\sigma^\ast\nabla^2v)\right)(t,x) +|\sigma^\ast\nabla v|^2(t,x)\right].$$ The assertion also holds on a connected complete differential manifold.
  • Using the Yale stellar evolution code, models of mu Her based on asteroseismic measurements are constructed. A $\chi^{2}$ minimization is performed to approach the best modeling parameters which reproduce the observations within their errors. By combining all non-asteroseismic constraints with asteroseismic measurements, we find that the observational constraints favour a model with a mass of 1.00$^{+ 0.01}_{- 0.02}$ $M_{\odot}$, an age t = 6.433 $\pm$ 0.04 Gyr, a mixing-length parameter $\alpha$ = 1.75 $\pm$ 0.25, an initial hydrogen abundance $X_{i}$ = 0.605$^{+ 0.01}_{- 0.005}$ and metal abundance $Z_{i}$ = 0.0275$^{+ 0.002}_{- 0.001}$. mu Her is in post-main sequence phase of evolution. The modes of $l$ = 1 show up the characteristics of avoided crossings, which may be applied to test the internal structure of this type stars. Asteroseismic measurements can be used as a complementary constraint on the modeling parameters. The models with mass 1.00 - 1.10 $M_{\odot}$ can reproduce the observational constraints. Existing observed data of mu Her do not rule out these models.
  • We address the influence of the orbital symmetry and of the molecular alignment with respect to the laser-field polarization on laser-induced nonsequential double ionization of diatomic molecules, in the length and velocity gauges. We work within the strong-field approximation and assume that the second electron is dislodged by electron-impact ionization, and also consider the classical limit of this model. We show that the electron-momentum distributions exhibit interference maxima and minima due to the electron emission at spatially separated centers. The interference patterns survive the integration over the transverse momenta for a small range of alignment angles, and are sharpest for parallel-aligned molecules. Due to the contributions of transverse-momentum components, these patterns become less defined as the alignment angle increases, until they disappear for perpendicular alignment. This behavior influences the shapes and the peaks of the electron momentum distributions.
  • Spin Hall effect can be induced both by the extrinsic impurity scattering and by the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in the electronic structure. The HgTe/CdTe quantum well has a quantum phase transition where the electronic structure changes from normal to inverted. We show that the intrinsic spin Hall effect of the conduction band vanishes on the normal side, while it is finite on the inverted side. This difference gives a direct mechanism to experimentally distinguish the intrinsic spin Hall effect from the extrinsic one.
  • In double quantum dots, the exchange interaction between two electron spins renormalizes the excitation energy of pair-flips in the nuclear spin bath, which in turn modifies the non-Markovian bath dynamics. As the energy renormalization varies with the Overhauser field mismatch between the quantum dots, the electron singlet-triplet decoherence resulting from the bath dynamics depends on sampling of nuclear spin states from an ensemble, leading to the transition from exponential decoherence in single-sample dynamics to power-law decay under ensemble averaging. In contrast, the decoherence of a single electron spin in one dot is essentially the same for different choices of the nuclear spin configuration.
  • We investigate the spin-polarized transport properties of a two-dimensional electron gas in a n-type diluted magnetic narrow gap semiconductor quantum well subjected to a perpendicular magnetic and electric field. Interesting beating patterns in the magneto resistance are found which can be tuned significantly by varying the electric field. A resonant enhancement of spin-polarized current is found which is induced by the competition between the s-d exchange interaction and the Rashba effect [Y. A. Bychkov and E. I. Rashba, J. Phys. C 17, 6039 (1984)].
  • We find that the Rashba spin splitting is intrinsically a nonlinear function of the momentum, and the linear Rasha model may overestimate it significantly, especially in narrow-gap materials. A nonlinear Rashba model is proposed, which is in good agreement with the numerical results from the eight-band kp theory. Using this model, we find pronounced suppression of the D'yakonov-Perel' spin relaxation rate at large electron densities, and a non-monotonic dependence of the resonance peak position of electron spin lifetime on the electron density in [111]-oriented quantum wells, both in qualitative disagreement with the predictions of the linear Rashba model.
  • A characteristic feature of the copper oxide high-temperature superconductors is the dichotomy between the electronic excitations along the nodal (diagonal) and antinodal (parallel to the Cu-O bonds) directions in momentum space, generally assumed to be linked to the "d-wave" symmetry of the superconducting state. Angle-resolved photoemission measurements in the superconducting state have revealed a quasiparticle spectrum with a d-wave gap structure that exhibits a maximum along the antinodal direction and vanishes along the nodal direction. Subsequent measurements have shown that, at low doping levels, this gap structure persists even in the high-temperature metallic state, although the nodal points of the superconducting state spread out in finite "Fermi arcs". This is the so-called pseudogap phase, and it has been assumed that it is closely linked to the superconducting state, either by assigning it to fluctuating superconductivity or by invoking orders which are natural competitors of d-wave superconductors. Here we report experimental evidence that a very similar pseudogap state with a nodal-antinodal dichotomous character exists in a system that is markedly different from a superconductor: the ferromagnetic metallic groundstate of the colossal magnetoresistive bilayer manganite La1.2Sr1.8Mn2O7. Our findings therefore cast doubt on the assumption that the pseudogap state in the copper oxides and the nodal-antinodal dichotomy are hallmarks of the superconductivity state.
  • The transport property of a lateral two-dimensional diluted magnetic semiconductor electron gas under a spatially periodic magnetic field is investigated theoretically. We find that the electron Fermi velocity along the modulation direction is highly spin-dependent even if the spin polarization of the carrier population is negligibly small. It turns out that this spin-polarized Fermi velocity alone can lead to a strong spin polarization of the current, which is still robust against the energy broadening effect induced by the impurity scattering.
  • Electron spin relaxation induced by phonon-mediated s-d exchange interaction in a II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dot is investigated theoretically. The electron-acoustic phonon interaction due to piezoelectric coupling and deformation potential is included. The resulting spin lifetime is typically on the order of microseconds. The effectiveness of the phonon-mediated spin-flip mechanism increases with increasing Mn concentration, electron spin splitting, vertical confining strength and lateral diameter, while it shows non-monotonic dependence on the magnetic field and temperature. An interesting finding is that the spin relaxation in a small quantum dot is suppressed for strong magnetic field and low Mn concentration at low temperature.