• We propose, design and construct a variant of the conventional axion haloscope concept that could be competitive in the search for dark matter axions of masses in the decade 10-100 $\mu$eV. Theses masses are located somewhat above the mass range in which existing experiments have reached sensitivity to benchmark QCD axion models. Our haloscope consists of an array of small microwave cavities connected by rectangular irises, in an arrangement commonly used in radio-frequency filters. The size of the unit cavity determines the main resonant frequency, while the possibility to connect a {large} number of cavities allows to reach large detection volumes. We develop the theoretical framework of the detection concept, and present design prescriptions to optimize detection capabilities. We describe the design and realization of a first small-scale prototype of this concept, called Relic Axion Detector Exploratory Setup (RADES). It consists of a copper-coated stainless steel five-cavities microwave filter with the detecting mode operating at around 8.4 GHz. This structure has been electromagnetically characterized at 2 K and 298 K, and it is now placed in ultra-high vacuum in one of the twin-bores of the 9 T CAST dipole magnet at CERN. We describe the data acquisition system developed for relic axion detection, and present preliminary results of the electromagnetic properties of the microwave filter, which show the potential of filters to reach QCD axion window sensitivity at X-band frequencies.
  • Irradiation of a sharp tungsten tip by a femtosecond laser and exposed to a strong DC electric field led to gradual and reproducible surface modifications. By a combination of field emission microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed asymmetric surface faceting with sub-ten nanometer high steps. The presence of well pronounced faceted features mainly on the laser-exposed side implies that the surface modification was driven by a laser-induced transient temperature rise -- on a scale of a couple of picoseconds -- in the tungsten tip apex. Moreover, we identified the formation of a nano-tip a few nanometers high located at one of the corners of a faceted plateau. The results of simulations emulating the experimental conditions, are consistent with the experimental observations. The presented conditions can be used as a new method to fabricate nano-tips of few nm height, which can be used in coherent electron pulses generation. Besides the direct practical application, the results also provide insight into the microscopic mechanisms of light-matter interaction. The apparent growth mechanism of the features may also help to explain the origin of enhanced electron field emission, which leads to vacuum arcs, in high electric-field devices such as radio-frequency particle accelerators.
  • The new High Repetition Rate (HRR) CERN DC Spark System has been used to investigate the current and voltage time structure of a breakdown. Simulations indicate that vacuum breakdowns develop on ns timescales or even less. An experimental benchmark for this timescale is critical for comparison to simulations. The fast rise time of breakdown may provide some explanation of the particularly high gradients achieved by low group velocity, and narrow bandwidth, accelerating structures such as the T18 and T24. Voltage and current measurements made with the previous system indicated that the transient responses measured were dominated by the inherent capacitances and inductances of the DC spark system itself. The bandwidth limitations of the HRR system are far less severe allowing rise times of approximately 12ns to be measured.