• We report the discovery of three moderately high-mass transiting hot Jupiters from the HATSouth survey: HATS-22b, HATS-23b and HATS-24b. These planets add to the numbers of known planets in the ~2MJ regime. HATS-22b is a 2.74+/-0.11 MJ mass and 0.953+0.048/-0.029 RJ radius planet orbiting a V = 13.455 +/- 0.040 sub-silar mass (M_star = 0.759+/-0.019 M_sun; R_star = 0.759+/-0.019 R_sun) K-dwarf host star on an eccentric (e = 0.079 +/- 0.026) orbit. This planet's high planet-to-stellar mass ratio is further evidence that migration mechanisms for hot Jupiters may rely on exciting orbital eccentricities that bring planets closer to their parent stars followed by tidal circularisation. HATS-23b is a 1.478 +/- 0.080 MJ mass and 1.69 +/- 0.24 RJ radius planet on a grazing orbit around a V = 13.901 +/- 0.010 G-dwarf with properties very similar to those of the Sun (M_star = 1.115 +/- 0.054 M_sun; R_star = 1.145 +/- 0.070 R_sun). HATS-24b orbits a moderately bright V = 12.830 +/- 0.010 F-dwarf star (M_star = 1.218 +/- 0.036 M_sun; R_star = 1.194+0.066/-0.041 R_sun). This planet has a mass of 2.39 +0.21/-0.12 MJ and an inflated radius of 1.516 +0.085/-0.065 RJ.
  • The analysis of Proxima Centauri's radial velocities recently led Anglada-Escud\'e et al. (2016) to claim the presence of a low mass planet orbiting the Sun's nearest star once every 11.2 days. Although the a-priori probability that Proxima b transits its parent star is just 1.5%, the potential impact of such a discovery would be considerable. Independent of recent radial velocity efforts, we observed Proxima Centauri for 12.5 days in 2014 and 31 days in 2015 with the MOST space telescope. We report here that we cannot make a compelling case that Proxima b transits in our precise photometric time series. Imposing an informative prior on the period and phase, we do detect a candidate signal with the expected depth. However, perturbing the phase prior across 100 evenly spaced intervals reveals one strong false-positive and one weaker instance. We estimate a false-positive rate of at least a few percent and a much higher false-negative rate of 20-40%, likely caused by the very high flare rate of Proxima Centauri. Comparing our candidate signal to HATSouth ground-based photometry reveals that the signal is somewhat, but not conclusively, disfavored (1-2 sigmas) leading us to argue that the signal is most likely spurious. We expect that infrared photometric follow-up could more conclusively test the existence of this candidate signal, owing to the suppression of flare activity and the impressive infrared brightness of the parent star.
  • We present the discovery of the transiting exoplanets HAT-P-65b and HAT-P-66b, with orbital periods of 2.6055 d and 2.9721 d, masses of $0.527 \pm 0.083$ M$_{J}$ and $0.783 \pm 0.057$ M$_{J}$ and inflated radii of $1.89 \pm 0.13$ R$_{J}$ and $1.59^{+0.16}_{-0.10}$ R$_{J}$, respectively. They orbit moderately bright ($V=13.145 \pm 0.029$, and $V=12.993 \pm 0.052$) stars of mass $1.212 \pm 0.050$ M$_{\odot}$ and $1.255^{+0.107}_{-0.054}$ M$_{\odot}$. The stars are at the main sequence turnoff. While it is well known that the radii of close-in giant planets are correlated with their equilibrium temperatures, whether or not the radii of planets increase in time as their hosts evolve and become more luminous is an open question. Looking at the broader sample of well-characterized close-in transiting giant planets, we find that there is a statistically significant correlation between planetary radii and the fractional ages of their host stars, with a false alarm probability of only 0.0041%. We find that the correlation between the radii of planets and the fractional ages of their hosts is fully explained by the known correlation between planetary radii and their present day equilibrium temperatures, however if the zero-age main sequence equilibrium temperature is used in place of the present day equilibrium temperature then a correlation with age must also be included to explain the planetary radii. This suggests that, after contracting during the pre-main-sequence, close-in giant planets are re-inflated over time due to the increasing level of irradiation received from their host stars. Prior theoretical work indicates that such a dynamic response to irradiation requires a significant fraction of the incident energy to be deposited deep within the planetary interiors.
  • By using the dense coverage of the extrasolar planet survey project HATNet, we Fourier analyze 381 high-probability members of the nearby open cluster Praesepe (Beehive/M44/NGC 2632). In addition to the detection of 10 variables (of \delta Scuti and other types), we identify 180 rotational variables (including the two known planet hosts). This sample increases the number of known rotational variables in this cluster for spectral classes earlier than M by more than a factor of three. These stars closely follow a color/magnitude -- period relation from early F to late K stars. We approximate this relation by polynomials for an easier reference to the rotational characteristics in different colors. The total (peak-to-peak) amplitudes of the large majority (94%) of these variables span the range of 0.005 to 0.04 mag. The periods cover a range from 2.5 to 15 days. These data strongly confirm that Praesepe and the Hyades have the same gyrochronological ages. Regarding the two planet hosts, Pr0211 (the one with the shorter orbital period) has a rotational period that is ~2 days shorter than the one expected from the main rotational pattern in this cluster. This, together with other examples discussed in the paper, may hint that star-planet interaction via tidal dissipation can be significant in some cases in the rotational evolution of stars hosting Hot Jupiters.