• \mu\ Columbae is a prototypical weak-wind O-star for which we have obtained a high-resolution X-ray spectrum with the Chandra LETG/ACIS-S instrument and a low resolution spectrum with Suzaku. This allows us, for the first time, to investigate the role of X-rays on the wind structure in a bona fide weak-wind system and to determine whether there actually is a massive, hot wind. The X-ray emission measure indicates that the outflow is an order of magnitude greater than that derived from UV lines and is commensurate with the nominal wind-luminosity relationship for O-stars. Therefore, the ``weak-wind problem''---identified from cool wind UV/optical spectra---is largely resolved by accounting for the hot wind seen in X-rays. From X-ray line profiles, Doppler shifts, and relative strengths, we find that this weak-wind star is typical of other late O dwarfs. The X-ray spectra do not suggest a magnetically confined plasma---the spectrum is soft and lines are broadened; Suzaku spectra confirm the lack of emission above 2 keV. Nor do the relative line shifts and widths suggest any wind decoupling by ions. The He-like triplets indicate that the bulk of the X-ray emission is formed rather close to the star, within 5 stellar radii. Our results challenge the idea that some OB stars are ``weak-wind'' stars that deviate from the standard wind-luminosity relationship. The wind is not weak, but it is hot and its bulk is only detectable in X-rays.
  • The Great Nebula in Carina provides an exceptional view into the violent massive star formation and feedback that typifies giant HII regions and starburst galaxies. We have mapped the Carina star-forming complex in X-rays, using archival Chandra data and a mosaic of 20 new 60ks pointings using the Chandra X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer, as a testbed for understanding recent and ongoing star formation and to probe Carina's regions of bright diffuse X-ray emission. This study has yielded a catalog of properties of >14,000 X-ray point sources; >9800 of them have multiwavelength counterparts. Using Chandra's unsurpassed X-ray spatial resolution, we have separated these point sources from the extensive, spatially-complex diffuse emission that pervades the region; X-ray properties of this diffuse emission suggest that it traces feedback from Carina's massive stars. In this introductory paper, we motivate the survey design, describe the Chandra observations, and present some simple results, providing a foundation for the 15 papers that follow in this Special Issue and that present detailed catalogs, methods, and science results.
  • The observed X-ray source temperature distributions in OB stellar winds, as determined from high energy resolution Chandra observations, show that the highest temperatures occur near the star, and then steadily decrease outward through the wind. To explain this unexpected behavior, we propose a shock model concept that utilizes a well-known magnetic propulsion mechanism; the surface ejection of "diamagnetic plasmoids" into a diverging external magnetic field. This produces rapidly accelerating self-contained structures that plow through an ambient wind and form bow shocks that generate a range in X-ray temperatures determined by the plasmoid-wind relative velocities. The model free parameters are the plasmoid initial Alfven speed, the initial plasma-beta of the external medium, and the divergence rate of the external field. These are determined by fitting the predicted bow shock temperatures with the observed OB supergiant X-ray temperature distribution. We find that the initial external plasma-beta has a range between 0 and 2, and the assumed radially-decreasing external magnetic field strength that scales as r^{-S} has a value of S lying between 2 and 3. Most importantly, the initial plasmoid Alfven speed is found to be well-constrained at a value of 0.6 times the terminal velocity, which appears to represent an upper limit for all normal OB stars. This intriguing new limit on OB magnetic properties, as derived from Chandra observations, emphasizes the need for further studies of magnetic propulsion mechanisms in these stars.
  • Chandra high energy resolution observations have now been obtained from numerous non-peculiar O and early B stars. The observed X-ray emission line properties differ from pre-launch predictions, and the interpretations are still problematic. We present a straightforward analysis of a broad collection of OB stellar line profile data to search for morphological trends. X-ray line emission parameters and the spatial distributions of derived quantities are examined with respect to luminosity class. The X-ray source locations and their corresponding temperatures are extracted by using the He-like f/i line ratios and the H-like to He-like line ratios respectively. Our luminosity class study reveals line widths increasing with luminosity. Although the majority of the OB emission lines are found to be symmetric, with little central line displacement, there is evidence for small, but finite, blue-ward line-shifts that also increase with luminosity. The spatial X-ray temperature distributions indicate that the highest temperatures occur near the star and steadily decrease outward. This trend is most pronounced in the OB supergiants. For the lower density wind stars, both high and low X-ray source temperatures exist near the star. However, we find no evidence of any high temperature X-ray emission in the outer wind regions for any OB star. Since the temperature distributions are counter to basic shock model predictions, we call this the "near-star high-ion problem" for OB stars. By invoking the traditional OB stellar mass loss rates, we find a good correlation between the fir-inferred radii and their associated X-ray continuum optical depth unity radii. We conclude by presenting some possible explanations to the X-ray source problems that have been revealed by this study.
  • The high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy made possible by the 1999 deployment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory has revolutionized our understanding of stellar X-ray emission. Many puzzles remain, though, particularly regarding the mechanisms of X-ray emission from OB stars. Although numerous individual stars have been observed in high-resolution, realizing the full scientific potential of these observations will necessitate studying the high-resolution Chandra dataset as a whole. To facilitate the rapid comparison and characterization of stellar spectra, we have compiled a uniformly processed database of all stars observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). This database, known as X-Atlas, is accessible through a web interface with searching, data retrieval, and interactive plotting capabilities. For each target, X-Atlas also features predictions of the low-resolution ACIS spectra convolved from the HETG data for comparison with stellar sources in archival ACIS images. Preliminary analyses of the hardness ratios, quantiles, and spectral fits derived from the predicted ACIS spectra reveal systematic differences between the high-mass and low-mass stars in the atlas and offer evidence for at least two distinct classes of high-mass stars. A high degree of X-ray variability is also seen in both high and low-mass stars, including Capella, long thought to exhibit minimal variability. X-Atlas contains over 130 observations of approximately 25 high-mass stars and 40 low-mass stars and will be updated as additional stellar HETG observations become public. The atlas has recently expanded to non-stellar point sources, and Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) observations are currently being added as well.
  • The low resolution X-ray spectra around $\eta$ Car covering Tr 16 and part of Tr 14 have been extracted from a Chandra CCD ACIS image. Various analysis techniques have been applied to the spectra based on their count rates. The spectra with the greatest number of counts (HD 93162 = WR 25, HD 93129AB, and HD 93250) have been fit with a wind model, which uses several components with different temperatures and depths in the wind. Weaker spectra have been fit with Raymond-Smith models. The weakest spectra are simply inter-compared with strong spectra. In general, fits produce reasonable parameters based on knowledge of the extinction from optical studies and on the range of temperatures for high and low mass stars. Direct comparisons of spectra confirm the consistency of the fitting results and also hardness ratios for cases of unusually large extinction in the clusters. The spectra of the low mass stars are harder than the more massive stars. Stars in the sequence evolving from the main sequence (HD 93250) through the system containing the O supergiant (HD 93129AB) and then through the Wolf-Rayet stage (HD93162), presumably ending in the extreme example of $\eta$ Car, share the property of being unusually luminous and hard in X-rays. For these X-ray luminous stars, their high mass and evolutionary status (from the very last stages of the main sequence and beyond) is the common feature. Their binary status is mixed, and magnetic status is still uncertain.
  • We report on a Chandra line spectrum observation of the O supergiant, Zeta Orionis (O9.7 Ib). A 73.4 ks HETGS observation shows a wide range of ionization stages and line strengths over the wavelength range of 5 to 26 A. The observed emission lines indicate a range in temperature of 2 to 10 MK which is consistent with earlier X-ray observations of Zeta Ori. Many lines are spectrally resolved showing Doppler broadening of 900 +/- 200 km/s. The observed He-like ions (O VII, Ne IX, Mg XI, and Si XIII) provide information about the spatial distribution of the X-ray emission. Although the observations support a wind distribution of X-ray sources, we find three conflicting results. First, line diagnostics for SIXIII indicate that this line emission forms very close to the stellar surface, where the density is of order 10^{12} cm^{-3}, but the velocity there is too small to produce the shock jump required for the observed ionization level. Second, the strong X-ray line profiles are symmetric and do not show any evidence of Doppler blue-shifted line centroids which are expected to accompany an outwardly moving source in a high density wind. Third, the observed velocity dispersions do not appear to correlate with the associated X-ray source radii velocities, contrary to expectations of wind distributed source models. A composite source model involving wind shocks and some magnetic confinement of turbulent hot plasma in a highly non-symmetric wind, appears to be needed to explain the line diagnostic anomalies.