• Indium-doped SnTe has been of interest because the system can exhibit both topological surface states and bulk superconductivity. While the enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature is established, the character of the electronic states induced by indium doping remains poorly understood. We report a study of magneto-transport in a series of Sn$_{1-x}$In$_x$Te single crystals with $0.1\le x \le 0.45$. From measurements of the Hall effect, we find that the dominant carrier type changes from hole-like to electron-like at $x\sim0.25$; one would expect electron-like carriers if the In ions have a valence of $+3$. For single crystals with $x = 0.45$, corresponding to the highest superconducting transition temperature, pronounced Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations are observed in the normal state. In measurements of magnetoresistance, we find evidence for weak anti-localization (WAL). We attribute both the quantum oscillations and the WAL to bulk Dirac-like hole pockets, previously observed in photoemission studies, which coexist with the dominant electron-like carriers.
  • Contrary to the electric charge that generates the electric field, magnetic charge (namely magnetic monopoles) does not exist in the elementary electromagnetism. Consequently, magnetic flux lines only form loops and cannot have a source or a sink in nature. It is thus extraordinary to find that magnetic monopoles can be pictured conceptually in topological materials. Specifically in the 2D topological insulators, the topological invariant corresponds to the total flux of an effective magnetic field (the Berry curvature) over the reciprocal space.It is thus tempting to wrap the 2D reciprocal space into a compact manifold--a torus, and imagine the total flux to originate from magnetic monopoles inside the torus with a quantized total charge. However, such a physically appealing picture has not been realized quantitatively: other than their existence in a toy (actually misleading) picture, the properties of the magnetic monopoles remain unknown. Here, we will address this long-standing problem by hunting down the magnetic monopoles in the reciprocal $k$-space. We will show that a simple and physically useful picture will arrive upon analytically continuing the system to a third imaginary momentum space. We then illustrate the evolution of the magnetic monopoles across the topological phase transition and use it to provide natural explanations on: 1) discontinuous jump of integer topological invariants, 2) the semi-metallic nature on the phase boundary, and 3) how a change of global topology can be induced via a local change in reciprocal space.
  • The electronic band structure of correlated Ca3Ru2O7 featuring an antiferromagnetic as well as a structural transition has been determined theoretically at high temperatures, which has led to the understanding of the remarkable properties of Ca3Ru2O7 such as the bulk spin valve effects. However, its band structure and Fermi surface (FS) below the structural transition have not been resolved even though a FS consisting of electron pockets was found experimentally. Here we report magneto electrical transport and thermoelectric measurements with the electric current and temper- ature gradient directed along a and b axes of an untwined single crystal of Ca3Ru2O7 respectively. The thermopower obtained along the two crystal axes were found to show opposite signs at low temperatures, demonstrating the presence of both electron and hole pockets on the FS. In addition, how the FS evolves across T* = 30 K at which a distinct transition from coherent to incoherent behavior occurs was also inferred - the Hall and Nernst coefficient results suggest a temperature and momentum dependent partial gap opening in Ca3Ru2O7 below the structural transition, with a pos- sible Lifshitz transition occurring at T*. The experimental demonstration of a correlated semimetal ground state in Ca3Ru2O7 calls for further theoretical studies of this remarkable material.
  • The normal state of cuprate superconductors exhibits many exotic behaviors[1][2] qualitatively different from the Fermi liquid, the foundation of condensed matter physics. Here we demonstrate that non-Fermi liquid (NFL) behaviors emerge naturally from scattering against a two-orbital bosonic liquid of tightly-bound pairs. Particularly, we find a finite zero-energy scattering rate at low-temperature limit that grows linearly with respect to temperature, against clean fermions' generic non-dissipative characteristics. Surprisingly, three other seemingly unrelated experimental observations are also produced, including the well-studied "kink"[3-9] in the quasi-particle dispersion, as well as the puzzling correspondences between the normal and superconducting state[10,11]. Our findings provide a general route for fermionic systems to generate NFL behavior, and suggest strongly that the cuprates be in this exotic regime in which doped holes develop bosonic characteristics by forming tightly bound pairs, whose low-temperature condensation gives unconventional superconductivity.
  • Here we report the observation of pressure-induced melting of antiferromagnetic (AFM) order and emergence of a new quantum state in the honeycomb-lattice halide alpha-RuCl3, a candidate compound in the proximity of quantum spin liquid state. Our high-pressure heat capacity measurements demonstrate that the AFM order smoothly melts away at a critical pressure (Pc) of 0.7 GPa. Intriguingly, the AFM transition temperature displays an increase upon applying pressure below the Pc, in stark contrast to usual phase diagrams, for example in pressurized parent compounds of unconventional superconductors. Furthermore, in the high-pressure phase an unusual steady of magnetoresistance is observed. These observations suggest that the high-pressure phase is in an exotic gapped quantum state which is robust against pressure up to ~140 GPa.
  • Unrevealing local magnetic and electronic correlations in the vicinity of charge carriers is crucial in order to understand rich physical properties in correlated electron systems. Here, using high-energy optical conductivity (up to 35 eV) as a function of temperature and polarization, we observe a surprisingly strong spin polarization of the local spin singlet with enhanced ferromagnetic correlations between Cu spins near the doped holes in lightly hole-doped La$_{1.95}$Sr$_{0.05}$Cu$_{0.95}$Zn$_{0.05}$O$_{4}$. The changes of the local spin polarization manifest strongly in the temperature-dependent optical conductivity at ~7.2 eV, with an anomaly at the magnetic stripe phase (~25 K), accompanied by anomalous spectral-weight transfer in a broad energy range. Supported by theoretical calculations, we also assign high-energy optical transitions and their corresponding temperature dependence, particularly at ~2.5 ~8.7, ~9.7, ~11.3 and ~21.8 eV. Our result shows the importance of a strong mixture of spin singlet and triplet states in hole-doped cuprates and demonstrates a new strategy to probe local magnetic correlations using high- energy optical conductivity in correlated electron systems.
  • Topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) have been of great interest in the area of condensed matter physics. We investigated the effect of indium substitution on the crystal structure and transport properties in the TCI system (Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_{x}$)$_{1-y}$In$_{y}$Te. For samples with a tin concentration $x\le50\%$, the low-temperature resisitivities show a dramatic variation as a function of indium concentration: with up to ~2% indium doping the samples show weak-metallic behavior, similar to their parent compounds; with ~6% indium doping, samples have true bulk-insulating resistivity and present evidence for nontrivial topological surface states; with higher indium doping levels, superconductivity was observed, with a transition temperature, Tc, positively correlated to the indium concentration and reaching as high as 4.7 K. We address this issue from the view of bulk electronic structure modified by the indium-induced impurity level that pins the Fermi level. The current work summarizes the indium substitution effect on (Pb,Sn)Te, and discusses the topological and superconducting aspects, which can be provide guidance for future studies on this and related systems.
  • We report systematic Angle Resolved Photoemission (ARPES) experiments using different photon polarizations and experimental geometries and find that the doping evolution of the normal state of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 deviates significantly from the predictions of a rigid band model. The data reveal a non-monotonic dependence upon doping of key quantities such as band filling, bandwidth of the electron pocket, and quasiparticle coherence. Our analysis suggests that the observed phenomenology and the inapplicability of the rigid band model in Co-doped Ba122 are due to electronic correlations, and not to either the size of the impurity potential, or self-energy effects due to impurity scattering. Our findings indicate that the effects of doping in pnictides are much more complicated than currently believed. More generally, they indicate that a deep understanding of the evolution of the electronic properties of the normal state, which requires an understanding of the doping process, remains elusive even for the 122 iron-pnictides, which are viewed as the least correlated of the high-TC unconventional superconductors.
  • Investigation of the inelastic neutron scattering spectra in Fe$_{1+y}$Te$_{1-x}$Se$_{x}$ near a signature wave vector $\mathbf{Q} = (1,0,0)$ for the bond-order wave (BOW) formation of parent compound Fe$_{1+y}$Te [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 187202 (2014)] reveals an acoustic-phonon-like dispersion present in all structural phases. While a structural Bragg peak accompanies the mode in the low-temperature phase of Fe$_{1+y}$Te, it is absent in the high-temperature tetragonal phase, where Bragg scattering at this $\mathbf{Q}$ is forbidden by symmetry. Notably, this mode is also observed in superconducting FeTe$_{0.55}$Se$_{0.45}$, where structural and magnetic transitions are suppressed, and no BOW has been observed. The presence of this "forbidden" phonon indicates that the lattice symmetry is dynamically or locally broken by magneto-orbital BOW fluctuations, which are strongly coupled to lattice in these materials.
  • We investigate the current debate on the Mn valence in Ga$_{1-x}$Mn$_x$N, a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMSs) with a potentially high Curie temperature. From a first-principles Wannier-function analysis, we unambiguously find the Mn valence to be close to $2+$ ($d^5$), but in a mixed spin configuration with average magnetic moments of 4$\mu_B$. By integrating out high-energy degrees of freedom differently, we further derive for the first time from first-principles two low-energy pictures that reflect the intrinsic dual nature of the doped holes in the DMS: 1) an effective $d^4$ picture ideal for local physics, and 2) an effective $d^5$ picture suitable for extended properties. In the latter, our results further reveal a few novel physical effects, and pave the way for future realistic studies of magnetism. Our study not only resolves one of the outstanding key controversies of the field, but also exemplifies the general need for multiple effective descriptions to account for the rich low-energy physics in many-body systems in general.
  • We demonstrate that the zero-temperature superconducting phase diagram of underdoped cuprates can be quantitatively understood in the strong binding limit, using only the experimental spectral function of the "normal" pseudo-gap phase without any free parameter. In the prototypical (La$_{1-x}$Sr$_x$)$_2$CuO$_4$, a kinetics-driven $d$-wave superconductivity is obtained above the critical doping $\delta_c\sim 5.2\%$, below which complete loss of superfluidity results from local quantum fluctuation involving local $p$-wave pairs. Near the critical doping, a enormous mass enhancement of the local pairs is found responsible for the observed rapid decrease of phase stiffness. Finally, a striking mass divergence is predicted at $\delta_c$ that dictates the occurrence of the observed quantum critical point and the abrupt suppression of the Nernst effects in the nearby region.
  • We generalize the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation to multiband disordered systems. Using our extended formalism, we perform a systematic study of the non-local correlation effects induced by disorder on the density of states and the mobility edge of the three-dimensional two-band Anderson model. We include inter-band and intra-band hopping and an intra-band disorder potential. Our results are consistent with the ones obtained by the transfer matrix and the kernel polynomial methods. We apply the method to K$_x$Fe$_{2-y}$Se$_2$ with Fe vacancies. Despite the strong vacancy disorder and anisotropy, we find the material is not an Anderson insulator. Our results demonstrate the application of the typical medium dynamical cluster approximation method to study Anderson localization in real materials.
  • We investigate the influence of itinerant carriers on dynamics and fluctuation of local moments in Fe-based superconductors, via linear spin-wave analysis of a spin-fermion model containing both itinerant and local degrees of freedom. Surprisingly against the common lore, instead of enhancing the ($\pi$,0) order, itinerant carriers with well nested Fermi surfaces is found to induce significant amount of \textit{spatial} and temporal quantum fluctuation that leads to the observed small ordered moment. Interestingly, the underlying mechanism is shown to be intra-pocket nesting-associated long-range coupling, rather than the previously believed ferromagnetic double-exchange effect. This challenges the validity of ferromagnetically compensated first-neighbor coupling reported from short-range fitting to the experimental dispersion, which turns out to result instead from the ferro-orbital order that is also found instrumental in stabilizing the magnetic order.
  • Three-dimensional topological insulators and topological crystalline insulators represent new quantum states of matter, which are predicted to have insulating bulk states and spin-momentum-locked gapless surface states. Experimentally, it has proven difficult to achieve the high bulk resistivity that would allow surface states to dominate the transport properties over a substantial temperature range. Here we report a series of indium-doped Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_x$Te compounds that manifest huge bulk resistivities together with strong evidence of topological surface states, based on thickness-dependent transport studies and magnetoresistance measurements. For these bulk-insulating materials, the surface states determine the resistivity for temperatures approaching 30 K.
  • We point out that in the deep band-inverted state, topological insulators are generically vulnerable against symmetry breaking instability, due to a divergently large density of states of 1D-like exponent near the chemical potential. This feature at the band edge is associated with a novel van Hove singularity resulting from the development of a Mexican-hat band dispersion. We demonstrate this generic behavior via prototypical 2D and 3D models. This realization not only explains the existing experimental observations of additional phases, but also suggests a route to activate additional functionalities to topological insulators via ordering, particularly for the long-sought topological superconductivities.
  • The characteristics of topological insulators are manifested in both their surface and bulk properties, but the latter remain to be explored. Here we report bulk signatures of pressure-induced band inversion and topological phase transitions in Pb$_{1-x}$Sn$_x$Se ($x=$0.00, 0.15, and 0.23). The results of infrared measurements as a function of pressure indicate the closing and the reopening of the band gap as well as a maximum in the free carrier spectral weight. The enhanced density of states near the band gap in the topological phase give rise to a steep interband absorption edge. The change of density of states also yields a maximum in the pressure dependence of the Fermi level. Thus our conclusive results provide a consistent picture of pressure-induced topological phase transitions and highlight the bulk origin of the novel properties in topological insulators.
  • We investigate an unusual symmetry of Fe-based superconductors (FeSCs) and find novel superconducting pairing structures. FeSCs have a minimal translational unit cell composed of two Fe atoms due to the staggered positions of anions with respect to the Fe plane. We study the physical consequences of the additional glide symmetry that further reduces the unit cell to have only one Fe atoms. In the regular momentum space, it not only leads to a particular orbital parity separated spectral function but also dictates orbital parity distinct pairing structures. Furthermore, it produces accompanying Cooper pairs of $(\pi,\pi,0)$ momentum, which have a characteristic \textit{odd} form factor and break time reversal symmetry. Such novel pairing structures explain the unusual angular modulations of the superconducting gaps on the hole pockets in recent ARPES and STS experiments.
  • Following the discovery of the potentially very high temperature superconductivity in monolayer FeSe we investigate the doping effect of Se vacancies in these materials. We find that Se vacancies pull a vacancy centered orbital below the Fermi energy that absorbs most of the doped electrons. Furthermore we find that the disorder induced broadening causes an effective hole doping. The surprising net result is that in terms of the band structure Se vacancies behave like hole dopants rather than electron dopants. Our results exclude Se vacancies as the origin of the large electron pockets measured by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy.
  • The Fermi surface topology of $cI$16 Li at high pressures is studied using a recently developed first-principles unfolding method. We find the occurrence of a Lifshitz transition at $\sim$43 GPa, which explains the experimentally observed anomalous onset of the superconductivity enhancement toward lowered pressure. Furthermore we identify, in comparison with previous reports, additional nesting vectors that contribute to the $cI$16 structural stability. Our study highlights the importance of three-dimensional unfolding analyses for first-principles studies of Fermi surface topologies and instabilities in general.
  • With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the electronic structure of TaFe$_{1.23}$Te$_3$, which is a two-leg spin ladder compound with a novel antiferromagnetic ground state. Quasi-two-dimensional Fermi surface is observed, indicating sizable inter-ladder hopping, which would facilitate the in-plane ferromagnetic ordering through double exchange interactions. Moreover, an energy gap is not observed at the Fermi surface in the antiferromagnetic state. Instead, the shifts of various bands have been observed. Combining these observations with density-functional-theory calculations, we propose that the large scale reconstruction of the electronic structure, caused by the interactions between the coexisting itinerant electrons and local moments, is most likely the driving force behind the magnetic transition. TaFe$_{1.23}$Te$_3$ thus provides a simpler system that contains similar ingredients as the parent compounds of iron-based superconductors, which yet could be readily modeled and understood.
  • We report the observation of two signatures of a pressure-induced topological quantum phase transition in the polar semiconductor BiTeI using x-ray powder diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The x-ray data confirm that BiTeI remains in its ambient-pressure structure up to 8 GPa. The lattice parameter ratio c/a shows a minimum between 2.0-2.9 GPa, indicating an enhanced c-axis bonding through pz band crossing as expected during the transition. Over the same pressure range, the infrared spectra reveal a maximum in the optical spectral weight of the charge carriers, reflecting the closing and reopening of the semiconducting band gap. Both of these features are characteristics of a topological quantum phase transition, and are consistent with a recent theoretical proposal.
  • We propose a simple first-principles method to describe propagation of tightly bound excitons. By viewing the exciton as a composite object (an effective Frenkel exciton in Wannier orbitals), we define an exciton kinetic kernel to encapsulate the exciton propagation and decay for all binding energy. Applied to prototypical LiF, our approach produces three exciton bands, which we verified quantitatively via inelastic x-ray scattering. The proposed real-space picture is computationally inexpensive and thus enables study of the full exciton dynamics, even in the presence of surfaces and impurity scattering. It also provides intuitive understanding to facilitate practical exciton engineering in semiconductors, strongly correlated oxides, and their nanostructures.
  • We report a first-principles Wannier function study of the electronic structure of PdTe. Its electronic structure is found to be a broad three-dimensional Fermi surface with highly reduced correlations effects. In addition, the higher filling of the Pd $d$-shell, its stronger covalency resulting from the closer energy of the Pd-$d$ and Te-$p$ shells, and the larger crystal field effects of the Pd ion due to its near octahedral coordination all serve to weaken significantly electronic correlations in the particle-hole (spin, charge, and orbital) channel. In comparison to the Fe Chalcogenide e.g., FeSe, we highlight the essential features (quasi-two-dimensionality, proximity to half-filling, weaker covalency, and higher orbital degeneracy) of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors.
  • Realization of conically linear dispersion, termed as Dirac cones, has recently opened up exciting opportunities for high-performance devices that make use of the peculiar transport properties of the massless carriers. A good example of current fashion is the heavily studied graphene, a single atomic layered graphite. It not only offers a prototype of Dirac physics in the field of condensed matter and materials science, but also provides a playground of various exotic phenomena. In the meantime, numerous routes have been attempted to search for the next "graphene". Despite these efforts, to date there is still no simple guideline to predict and engineer such massless particles in materials. Here, we propose a theoretical recipe to create Dirac cones into anyone's favorite materials. The method allows to tailor the properties, such as anisotropy and quantity, in any effective one-band two-dimensional lattice. We demonstrate the validity of our theory with two examples on the square lattice, an "unlikely" candidate hosting Dirac cones, and show that a graphene-like low-energy electronic structure can be realized. The proposed recipe can be applied in real materials via introduction of vacancy, substitution or intercalation, and also extended to photonic crystal, molecular array, and cold atoms systems.
  • Recent neutron scattering experiments addressing the magnetic state of the two-leg ladder selenide compound BaFe$_2$Se$_3$ have unveiled a dominant spin arrangement involving ferromagnetically ordered 2$\times$2 iron-superblocks, that are antiferromagnetically coupled among them (the "block-AFM" state). Using the electronic five-orbital Hubbard model, first principles techniques to calculate the electronic hopping amplitudes between irons, and the real-space Hartree-Fock approximation to handle the many-body effects, here it is shown that the exotic block-AFM state is indeed stable at realistic electronic densities close to $n \sim 6.0$. Another state (the "CX" state) with parallel spins along the rungs and antiparallel along the legs of the ladders is close in energy. This state becomes stable in other portions of the phase diagrams, such as with hole doping, as also found experimentally via neutron scattering applied to KFe$_2$Se$_3$. In addition, the present study unveils other competing magnetic phases that could be experimentally stabilized varying either $n$ chemically or the electronic bandwidth by pressure. Similar results were obtained using two-orbital models, studied here via Lanczos and DMRG techniques. A comparison of the results obtained with the realistic selenides hoppings amplitudes for BaFe$_2$Se$_3$ against those found using the hopping amplitudes for pnictides reveals several qualitative similarities, particularly at intermediate and large Hubbard couplings.