• In this paper, we consider the problem of finding a Nash equilibrium in a multi-player game over generally connected networks. This model differs from a conventional setting in that players have partial information on the actions of their opponents and the communication graph is not necessarily the same as the players' cost dependency graph. We develop a relatively fast algorithm within the framework of inexact-ADMM, based on local information exchange between the players. We prove its convergence to Nash equilibrium for fixed step-sizes and analyze its convergence rate. Numerical simulations illustrate its benefits when compared to a consensus-based gradient type algorithm with diminishing step-sizes.
  • In this paper, we develop a class of decentralized algorithms for solving a convex resource allocation problem in a network of $n$ agents, where the agent objectives are decoupled while the resource constraints are coupled. The agents communicate over a connected undirected graph, and they want to collaboratively determine a solution to the overall network problem, while each agent only communicates with its neighbors. We first study the connection between the decentralized resource allocation problem and the decentralized consensus optimization problem. Then, using a class of algorithms for solving consensus optimization problems, we propose a novel class of decentralized schemes for solving resource allocation problems in a distributed manner. Specifically, we first propose an algorithm for solving the resource allocation problem with an $o(1/k)$ convergence rate guarantee when the agents' objective functions are generally convex (could be nondifferentiable) and per agent local convex constraints are allowed; We then propose a gradient-based algorithm for solving the resource allocation problem when per agent local constraints are absent and show that such scheme can achieve geometric rate when the objective functions are strongly convex and have Lipschitz continuous gradients. We have also provided scalability/network dependency analysis. Based on these two algorithms, we have further proposed a gradient projection-based algorithm which can handle smooth objective and simple constraints more efficiently. Numerical experiments demonstrates the viability and performance of all the proposed algorithms.
  • In current power distribution systems, one of the most challenging operation tasks is to coordinate the network- wide distributed energy resources (DERs) to maintain the stability of voltage magnitude of the system. This voltage control task has been investigated actively under either distributed optimization-based or local feedback control-based characterizations. The former architecture requires a strongly-connected communication network among all DERs for implementing the optimization algorithms, a scenario not yet realistic in most of the existing distribution systems with under-deployed communication infrastructure. The latter one, on the other hand, has been proven to suffer from loss of network-wide op- erational optimality. In this paper, we propose a game-theoretic characterization for semi-local voltage control with only a locally connected communication network. We analyze the existence and uniqueness of the generalized Nash equilibrium (GNE) for this characterization and develop a fully distributed equilibrium-learning algorithm that relies on only neighbor-to-neighbor information exchange. Provable convergence results are provided along with numerical tests which corroborate the robust convergence property of the proposed algorithm.
  • Coordinated optimization and control of distribution-level assets can enable a reliable and optimal integration of massive amount of distributed energy resources (DERs) and facilitate distribution system management (DSM). Accordingly, the objective is to coordinate the power injection at the DERs to maintain certain quantities across the network, e.g., voltage magnitude, line flows, or line losses, to be close to a desired profile. By and large, the performance of the DSM algorithms has been challenged by two factors: i) the possibly non strongly connected communication network over DERs that hinders the coordination; ii) the dynamics of the real system caused by the DERs with heterogeneous capabilities, time-varying operating conditions, and real-time measurement mismatches. In this paper, we investigate the modeling and algorithm design and analysis with the consideration of these two factors. In particular, a game-theoretic characterization is first proposed to account for a locally connected communication network over DERs, along with the analysis of the existence and uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium (NE) therein. To achieve the equilibrium in a distributed fashion, a projected-gradient-based asynchronous DSM algorithm is then advocated. The algorithm performance, including the convergence speed and the tracking error, is analytically guaranteed under the dynamic setting. Extensive numerical tests on both synthetic and realistic cases corroborate the analytical results derived.
  • In this paper, we focus on solving a distributed convex optimization problem in a network, where each agent has its own convex cost function and the goal is to minimize the sum of the agents' cost functions while obeying the network connectivity structure. In order to minimize the sum of the cost functions, we consider a new distributed gradient-based method where each node maintains two estimates, namely, an estimate of the optimal decision variable and an estimate of the gradient for the average of the agents' objective functions. From the viewpoint of an agent, the information about the decision variable is pushed to the neighbors, while the information about the gradients is pulled from the neighbors (hence giving the name "push-pull gradient method"). The method unifies the algorithms with different types of distributed architecture, including decentralized (peer-to-peer), centralized (master-slave), and semi-centralized (leader-follower) architecture. We show that the algorithm converges linearly for strongly convex and smooth objective functions over a directed static network. In our numerical test, the algorithm performs well even for time-varying directed networks.
  • The charmonium photoproduction in high energy nuclear collisions is important not only in ultra peripheral events where there is no hadroproduction but also in semi-central events where the hot medium is created. Unlike the hadroproduction which is significantly suppressed by the hot medium, the coherent $\gamma A\to \Psi A$ process happens on the surfaces of the colliding nuclei and is only weakly affected by the fireball. We calculate the yield ratio of $\psi'$ to $J/\psi$ in the frame of a transport approach and find that its low transverse momentum behavior is still controlled by the photoproduction in semi-central nuclear collisions at the LHC energy.
  • We study the charmonium coherent photoproduction and hadroproduction consistently with modifications from both cold and hot nuclear matters. The strong electromagnetic fields from fast moving nucleus interact with the other target nucleus, producing abundant charmonium in the extremely low transverse momentum region $p_T<0.1$ GeV/c. This results in significative enhancement of $J/\psi$ nuclear modification factor in semi-central and peripheral collisions. In the middle $p_T$ region such as $p_T<3\sim 5$ GeV/c, $J/\psi$ final yield is dominated by the combination process of single charm and anti-charm quarks moving in the deconfined matter, $c+\bar c\rightarrow J/\psi +g$. In the higher $p_T$ region, $J/\psi$ production are mainly from parton initial hard scatterings at the beginning of nucleus-nucleus collisions and decay of B hadrons. We include all of these production mechanisms and explain the experimental data well in different colliding centralities and transverse momentum regions.
  • Hard magnets with high coercivity, such as Nd2Fe14B and SmCo5 alloys, can maintain magnetisation under a high reverse external magnetic field and have therefore become irreplaceable parts in many practical applications. Molecular magnets are promising alternatives, owing to their precise and designable chemical structures, tuneable functionalities and controllable synthetic methods. Here, we demonstrate that an unusually large coercive field can be achieved in a single-chain magnet. Systematic characterisations, including magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity and neutron diffraction measurements, show that the observed giant coercive field originates from the spin dynamics along the one-dimensional chain of the compound because of the strong exchange coupling between Co(II) centres and radicals.
  • Since the atomic clock was invented, its performance has been improved for one digit every decade until 90s of last century when the traditional atomic clock almost reached its limit. With laser cooled atoms, the performance can be further improved, and nowadays the cold atom based clocks are widely used as primary frequency standards. Such a kind of cold atom clocks has great applications in space. This paper presents the design and tests of a cold atom clock (CAC) operating in space. In microgravity, the atoms are cooled, trapped, launched and finally detected after being interrogated by microwave field with Ramsey method. The results of laser cooling of atoms in microgravity in orbit are presented and compared with that on ground for the first time. That the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of obtained central Ramsey fringes varies linearly with launching velocity of cold atoms shows the effects of microgravity. With appropriate parameters, a closed-loop locking of the CAC is realized in orbit and the estimated short term frequency stability of $3.0\times 10 ^{-13}/\sqrt{\tau }$ has been reached.
  • Voltage regulation in distribution networks is challenged by increasing penetration of distributed energy resources (DERs). Thanks to advancement in power electronics, these DERs can be leveraged to regulate the grid voltage by quickly changing the reactive power outputs. This paper develops a hybrid voltage control (HVC) strategy that can seamlessly integrate both local and distributed designs to coordinate the network-wide reactive power resources from DERs. \ws{By minimizing a special voltage mismatch objective, we achieve the proposed HVC architecture using partial primal-dual (PPD) gradient updates that allow for a distributed and online implementation}. The proposed HVC design improves over existing distributed approaches by integrating with local voltage feedback. As a result, it can dynamically adapt to varying system operating conditions while being fully cognizant to the instantaneous availability of communication links. Under the worst-case scenario of a total link outage, the proposed design naturally boils down to a surrogate local control implementation. Numerical tests on realistic feeder cases have been to corroborate our analytical results and demonstrate the algorithmic performance.
  • This paper proposes a novel proximal-gradient algorithm for a decentralized optimization problem with a composite objective containing smooth and non-smooth terms. Specifically, the smooth and nonsmooth terms are dealt with by gradient and proximal updates, respectively. The proposed algorithm is closely related to a previous algorithm, PG-EXTRA \cite{shi2015proximal}, but has a few advantages. First of all, agents use uncoordinated step-sizes, and the stable upper bounds on step-sizes are independent of network topologies. The step-sizes depend on local objective functions, and they can be as large as those of the gradient descent. Secondly, for the special case without non-smooth terms, linear convergence can be achieved under the strong convexity assumption. The dependence of the convergence rate on the objective functions and the network are separated, and the convergence rate of the new algorithm is as good as one of the two convergence rates that match the typical rates for the general gradient descent and the consensus averaging. We provide numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficacy of the introduced algorithm and validate our theoretical discoveries.
  • This paper considers the problem of distributed optimization over time-varying graphs. For the case of undirected graphs, we introduce a distributed algorithm, referred to as DIGing, based on a combination of a distributed inexact gradient method and a gradient tracking technique. The DIGing algorithm uses doubly stochastic mixing matrices and employs fixed step-sizes and, yet, drives all the agents' iterates to a global and consensual minimizer. When the graphs are directed, in which case the implementation of doubly stochastic mixing matrices is unrealistic, we construct an algorithm that incorporates the push-sum protocol into the DIGing structure, thus obtaining Push-DIGing algorithm. The Push-DIGing uses column stochastic matrices and fixed step-sizes, but it still converges to a global and consensual minimizer. Under the strong convexity assumption, we prove that the algorithms converge at R-linear (geometric) rates as long as the step-sizes do not exceed some upper bounds. We establish explicit estimates for the convergence rates. When the graph is undirected it shows that DIGing scales polynomially in the number of agents. We also provide some numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithms and to validate our theoretical findings.
  • High quality AlxGa1-xAs distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) were successfully monolithically grown on on-axis Si (100) substrates via a Ge layer formed by aspect ratio trapping (ART) technique. The GaAs/ART-Ge/Si-based DBRs have reflectivity spectra comparable to those grown on conventional bulk off-cut GaAs substrates and have smooth morphology, and good periodicity and uniformity. Anitphase domain formation is significantly reduced in GaAs on ART-Ge/Si substrates, and etch pit density of the GaAs base layer on the ART-Ge substrates ranges from 10^5 to 6 x 10^6 cm^(-2). These results paved the way for future VCSEL growth and fabrication on these ART-Ge substrates and also confirm that virtual Ge substrates via ART technique are effective Si platforms for optoelectronic integrated circuits.
  • In this paper, we discuss how to design the graph topology to reduce the communication complexity of certain algorithms for decentralized optimization. Our goal is to minimize the total communication needed to achieve a prescribed accuracy. We discover that the so-called expander graphs are near-optimal choices. We propose three approaches to construct expander graphs for different numbers of nodes and node degrees. Our numerical results show that the performance of decentralized optimization is significantly better on expander graphs than other regular graphs.
  • A recent algorithmic family for distributed optimization, DIGing's, have been shown to have geometric convergence over time-varying undirected/directed graphs. Nevertheless, an identical step-size for all agents is needed. In this paper, we study the convergence rates of the Adapt-Then-Combine (ATC) variation of the DIGing algorithm under uncoordinated step-sizes. We show that the ATC variation of DIGing algorithm converges geometrically fast even if the step-sizes are different among the agents. In addition, our analysis implies that the ATC structure can accelerate convergence compared to the distributed gradient descent (DGD) structure which has been used in the original DIGing algorithm.
  • Voltage control in power distribution networks has been greatly challenged by the increasing penetration of volatile and intermittent devices. These devices can also provide limited reactive power resources that can be used to regulate the network-wide voltage. A decentralized voltage control strategy can be designed by minimizing a quadratic voltage mismatch error objective using gradient-projection (GP) updates. Coupled with the power network flow, the local voltage can provide the instantaneous gradient information. This paper aims to analyze the performance of this decentralized GP-based voltage control design under two dynamic scenarios: i) the nodes perform the decentralized update in an asynchronous fashion, and ii) the network operating condition is time-varying. For the asynchronous voltage control, we improve the existing convergence condition by recognizing that the voltage based gradient is always up-to-date. By modeling the network dynamics using an autoregressive process and considering time-varying resource constraints, we provide an error bound in tracking the instantaneous optimal solution to the quadratic error objective. This result can be extended to more general \textit{constrained dynamic optimization} problems with smooth strongly convex objective functions under stochastic processes that have bounded iterative changes. Extensive numerical tests have been performed to demonstrate and validate our analytical results for realistic power networks.
  • Mode-locked fiber lasers are one of the most important sources of ultra-short pulses. However, A unified description for the rich variety of states and the driving forces behind the complex and diverse nonlinear behavior of mode-locked fiber lasers have yet to be developed. Here we present a comprehensive theoretical framework based upon complexity science, thereby offering a fundamentally new way of thinking about the behavior of mode-locked fiber lasers. This hierarchically structured frame work provide a model with and changeable variable dimensionality resulting in a simple and elegant view, with which numerous complex states can be described systematically. The existence of a set of new mode-locked fiber laser states is proposed for the first time. Moreover, research into the attractors' basins reveals the origin of stochasticity, hysteresis and multistability in these systems. These findings pave the way for dynamics analysis and new system designs of mode-locked fiber lasers. The paradigm will have a wide range of potential applications in diverse research fields.
  • This paper considers decentralized dynamic optimization problems where nodes of a network try to minimize a sequence of time-varying objective functions in a real-time scheme. At each time slot, nodes have access to different summands of an instantaneous global objective function and they are allowed to exchange information only with their neighbors. This paper develops the application of the Exact Second-Order Method (ESOM) to solve the dynamic optimization problem in a decentralized manner. The proposed dynamic ESOM algorithm operates by primal descending and dual ascending on a quadratic approximation of an augmented Lagrangian of the instantaneous consensus optimization problem. The convergence analysis of dynamic ESOM indicates that a Lyapunov function of the sequence of primal and dual errors converges linearly to an error bound when the local functions are strongly convex and have Lipschitz continuous gradients. Numerical results demonstrate the claim that the sequence of iterates generated by the proposed method is able to track the sequence of optimal arguments.
  • This paper considers decentralized consensus optimization problems where different summands of a global objective function are available at nodes of a network that can communicate with neighbors only. The proximal method of multipliers is considered as a powerful tool that relies on proximal primal descent and dual ascent updates on a suitably defined augmented Lagrangian. The structure of the augmented Lagrangian makes this problem non-decomposable, which precludes distributed implementations. This problem is regularly addressed by the use of the alternating direction method of multipliers. The exact second order method (ESOM) is introduced here as an alternative that relies on: (i) The use of a separable quadratic approximation of the augmented Lagrangian. (ii) A truncated Taylor's series to estimate the solution of the first order condition imposed on the minimization of the quadratic approximation of the augmented Lagrangian. The sequences of primal and dual variables generated by ESOM are shown to converge linearly to their optimal arguments when the aggregate cost function is strongly convex and its gradients are Lipschitz continuous. Numerical results demonstrate advantages of ESOM relative to decentralized alternatives in solving least squares and logistic regression problems.
  • Raman spectroscopy is the prime non-destructive characterization tool for graphene and related layered materials. The shear (C) and layer breathing modes (LBMs) are due to relative motions of the planes, either perpendicular or parallel to their normal. This allows one to directly probe the interlayer interactions in multilayer samples. Graphene and other two-dimensional (2d) crystals can be combined to form various hybrids and heterostructures, creating materials on demand with properties determined by the interlayer interaction. This is the case even for a single material, where multilayer stacks with different relative orientation have different optical and electronic properties. In twisted multilayer graphene samples there is a significant enhancement of the C modes due to resonance with new optically allowed electronic transitions, determined by the relative orientation of the layers. Here we show that this applies also to the LBMs, that can be now directly measured at room temperature. We find that twisting does not affect LBMs, quite different from the case of the C modes. This implies that the periodicity mismatch between two twisted layers mostly affects shear interactions. Our work shows that Raman spectroscopy is an ideal tool to uncover the interface coupling of 2d hybrids and heterostructures.
  • The anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals (vdW) layered materials, with both scientific interest and potential application, have one more dimension to tune the properties than the isotropic 2D materials. The interlayer vdW coupling determines the properties of 2D multi-layer materials by varying stacking orders. As an important representative anisotropic 2D materials, multilayer rhenium disulfide (ReS2) was expected to be random stacking and lack of interlayer coupling. Here, we demonstrate two stable stacking orders (aa and a-b) of N layer (NL, N>1) ReS2 from ultralow-frequency and high-frequency Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and first-principles density functional theory calculation. Two interlayer shear modes are observed in aa-stacked NL-ReS2 while only one interlayer shear mode appears in a-b-stacked NL-ReS2, suggesting anisotropic-like and isotropic-like stacking orders in aa- and a-b-stacked NL-ReS2, respectively. The frequency of the interlayer shear and breathing modes reveals unexpected strong interlayer coupling in aa- and a-b-NL-ReS2, the force constants of which are 55-90% to those of multilayer MoS2. The observation of strong interlayer coupling and polytypism in multi-layer ReS2 stimulate future studies on the structure, electronic and optical properties of other 2D anisotropic materials.
  • Two-dimensional Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) has shown promising prospects for the next generation electronics and optoelectronics devices. The monolayer MoS2 can be patterned into quasi-one-dimensional anisotropic MoS2 nanoribbons (MNRs), in which theoretical calculations have predicted novel properties. However, little work has been carried out in the experimental exploration of MNRs with a width of less than 20 nm where the geometrical confinement can lead to interesting phenomenon. Here, we prepared MNRs with width between 5 nm to 15 nm by direct helium ion beam milling. High optical anisotropy of these MNRs is revealed by the systematic study of optical contrast and Raman spectroscopy. The Raman modes in MNRs show strong polarization dependence. Besides that the E' and A'1 peaks are broadened by the phonon-confinement effect, the modes corresponding to singularities of vibrational density of states are activated by edges. The peculiar polarization behavior of Raman modes can be explained by the anisotropy of light absorption in MNRs, which is evidenced by the polarized optical contrast. The study opens the possibility to explore quasione-dimensional materials with high optical anisotropy from isotropic 2D family of transition metal dichalcogenides.
  • This paper considers an optimization problem that components of the objective function are available at different nodes of a network and nodes are allowed to only exchange information with their neighbors. The decentralized alternating method of multipliers (DADMM) is a well-established iterative method for solving this category of problems; however, implementation of DADMM requires solving an optimization subproblem at each iteration for each node. This procedure is often computationally costly for the nodes. We introduce a decentralized quadratic approximation of ADMM (DQM) that reduces computational complexity of DADMM by minimizing a quadratic approximation of the objective function. Notwithstanding that DQM successively minimizes approximations of the cost, it converges to the optimal arguments at a linear rate which is identical to the convergence rate of DADMM. Further, we show that as time passes the coefficient of linear convergence for DQM approaches the one for DADMM. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of DQM.
  • Magnetometer has received wide applications in attitude determination and scientific measurements. Calibration is an important step for any practical magnetometer use. The most popular three-axis magnetometer calibration methods are attitude-independent and have been founded on an approximate maximum likelihood (ML) estimation with a quartic subjective function, derived from the fact that the magnitude of the calibrated measurements should be constant in a homogeneous magnetic field. This paper highlights the shortcomings of those popular methods and proposes to use the quadratic optimal ML estimation instead for magnetometer calibration. Simulation and test results show that the optimal ML calibration is superior to the approximate ML methods for magnetometer calibration in both accuracy and stability, especially for those situations without sufficient attitude excitation. The significant benefits deserve the moderately increased computation burden. The main conclusion obtained in the context of magnetometer in this paper is potentially applicable to various kinds of three-axis sensors.
  • This paper considers decentralized consensus optimization problems where nodes of a network have access to different summands of a global objective function. Nodes cooperate to minimize the global objective by exchanging information with neighbors only. A decentralized version of the alternating directions method of multipliers (DADMM) is a common method for solving this category of problems. DADMM exhibits linear convergence rate to the optimal objective but its implementation requires solving a convex optimization problem at each iteration. This can be computationally costly and may result in large overall convergence times. The decentralized quadratically approximated ADMM algorithm (DQM), which minimizes a quadratic approximation of the objective function that DADMM minimizes at each iteration, is proposed here. The consequent reduction in computational time is shown to have minimal effect on convergence properties. Convergence still proceeds at a linear rate with a guaranteed constant that is asymptotically equivalent to the DADMM linear convergence rate constant. Numerical results demonstrate advantages of DQM relative to DADMM and other alternatives in a logistic regression problem.