• We investigate the galaxy quenching process at intermediate redshift using a sample of $\sim4400$ galaxies with $M_{\ast} > 10^{9}M_{\odot}$ between redshift 0.5 and 1.0 in all five CANDELS fields. We divide this sample, using the integrated specific star formation rate (sSFR), into four sub-groups: star-forming galaxies (SFGs) above and below the ridge of the star-forming main sequence (SFMS), transition galaxies and quiescent galaxies. We study their $UVI$ ($U-V$ versus $V-I$) color gradients to infer their sSFR gradients out to twice effective radii. We show that on average both star-forming and transition galaxies at all masses are not fully quenched at any radii, whereas quiescent galaxies are fully quenched at all radii. We find that at low masses ($M_{\ast} = 10^{9}-10^{10}M_{\odot}$) SFGs both above and below the SFMS ridge generally have flat sSFR profiles, whereas the transition galaxies at the same masses generally have sSFRs that are more suppressed in their outskirts. In contrast, at high masses ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$), SFGs above and below the SFMS ridge and transition galaxies generally have varying degrees of more centrally-suppressed sSFRs relative to their outskirts. These findings indicate that at $z\sim~0.5-1.0$ the main galaxy quenching mode depends on its already formed stellar mass, exhibiting a transition from "the outside-in" at $M_{\ast} \leq 10^{10}M_{\odot}$ to "the inside-out" at $M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$. In other words, our findings support that internal processes dominate the quenching of massive galaxies, whereas external processes dominate the quenching of low-mass galaxies.
  • We have measured the radial profiles of isophotal ellipticity ($\varepsilon$) and disky/boxy parameter A$_4$ out to radii of about three times the semi-major axes for $\sim4,600$ star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at intermediate redshifts $0.5<z<1.8$ in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields. Based on the average size versus stellar-mass relation in each redshift bin, we divide our galaxies into Small SFGs (SSFGs), i.e., smaller than average for its mass, and Large SFGs (LSFGs), i.e., larger than average. We find that, at low masses ($M_{\ast} < 10^{10}M_{\odot}$), the SSFGs generally have nearly flat $\varepsilon$ and A$_4$ profiles for both edge-on and face-on views, especially at redshifts $z>1$. Moreover, the median A$_4$ values at all radii are almost zero. In contrast, the highly-inclined, low-mass LSFGs in the same mass-redshift bins generally have monotonically increasing $\varepsilon$ with radius and are dominated by disky values at intermediate radii. These findings at intermediate redshifts imply that low-mass SSFGs are not disk-like, while low-mass LSFGs appear to harbour disk-like components flattened by significant rotation. At high masses ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10}M_{\odot}$), highly-inclined SSFGs and LSFGs both exhibit a general, distinct trend for both $\varepsilon$ and A$_4$ profiles: increasing values with radius at lower radii, reaching maxima at intermediate radii, and then decreasing values at larger radii. Such a trend is more prevalent for more massive ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$) galaxies or those at lower redshifts ($z<1.4$). The distinct trend in $\varepsilon$ and A$_4$ can be simply explained if galaxies possess all three components: central bulges, disks in the intermediate regions, and halo-like stellar components in the outskirts.
  • Studying giant star-forming clumps in distant galaxies is important to understand galaxy formation and evolution. At present, however, observers and theorists have not reached a consensus on whether the observed "clumps" in distant galaxies are the same phenomenon that is seen in simulations. In this paper, as a step to establish a benchmark of direct comparisons between observations and theories, we publish a sample of clumps constructed to represent the commonly observed "clumps" in the literature. This sample contains 3193 clumps detected from 1270 galaxies at $0.5 \leq z < 3.0$. The clumps are detected from rest-frame UV images, as described in our previous paper. Their physical properties, e.g., rest-frame color, stellar mass (M*), star formation rate (SFR), age, and dust extinction, are measured by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) to synthetic stellar population models. We carefully test the procedures of measuring clump properties, especially the method of subtracting background fluxes from the diffuse component of galaxies. With our fiducial background subtraction, we find a radial clump U-V color variation, where clumps close to galactic centers are redder than those in outskirts. The slope of the color gradient (clump color as a function of their galactocentric distance scaled by the semi-major axis of galaxies) changes with redshift and M* of the host galaxies: at a fixed M*, the slope becomes steeper toward low redshift, and at a fixed redshift, it becomes slightly steeper with M*. Based on our SED-fitting, this observed color gradient can be explained by a combination of a negative age gradient, a negative E(B-V) gradient, and a positive specific star formation rate gradient of the clumps. We also find that the color gradients of clumps are steeper than those of intra-clump regions. [Abridged]
  • The rest-frame UV-optical (i.e., $NUV-B$) color is sensitive to both low-level recent star formation (specific star formation rate - sSFR) and dust. In this Letter, we extend our previous work on the origins of $NUV-B$ color gradients in star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z\sim1$ to those at $z\sim2$. We use a sample of 1335 large (semi-major axis radius $R_{\rm SMA}>0.''18$) SFGs with extended UV emission out to $2R_{\rm SMA}$ in the mass range $M_{\ast} = 10^{9}-10^{11}M_{\odot}$ at $1.5<z<2.8$ in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields. We show that these SFGs generally have negative $NUV-B$ color gradients (redder centres), and their color gradients strongly increase with galaxy mass. We also show that the global rest-frame $FUV-NUV$ color is approximately linear with $A_{\rm V}$, which is derived by modeling the observed integrated FUV to NIR spectral energy distributions of the galaxies. Applying this integrated calibration to our spatially-resolved data, we find a negative dust gradient (more dust extinguished in the centers), which steadily becomes steeper with galaxy mass. We further find that the $NUV-B$ color gradients become nearly zero after correcting for dust gradients regardless of galaxy mass. This indicates that the sSFR gradients are negligible and dust reddening is likely the principal cause of negative UV-optical color gradients in these SFGs. Our findings support that the buildup of the stellar mass in SFGs at the Cosmic Noon is self-similar inside $2R_{\rm SMA}$.
  • In statistics and machine learning, people are often interested in the eigenvectors (or singular vectors) of certain matrices (e.g. covariance matrices, data matrices, etc). However, those matrices are usually perturbed by noises or statistical errors, either from random sampling or structural patterns. One usually employs Davis-Kahan $\sin \theta$ theorem to bound the difference between the eigenvectors of a matrix $A$ and those of a perturbed matrix $\widetilde{A} = A + E$, in terms of $\ell_2$ norm. In this paper, we prove that when $A$ is a low-rank and incoherent matrix, the $\ell_{\infty}$ norm perturbation bound of singular vectors (or eigenvectors in the symmetric case) is smaller by a factor of $\sqrt{d_1}$ or $\sqrt{d_2}$ for left and right vectors, where $d_1$ and $d_2$ are the matrix dimensions. The power of this new perturbation result is shown in robust covariance estimation, particularly when random variables have heavy tails. There, we propose new robust covariance estimators and establish their asymptotic properties using the newly developed perturbation bound. Our theoretical results are verified through extensive numerical experiments.
  • This paper uses radial colour profiles to infer the distributions of dust, gas and star formation in z=0.4-1.4 star-forming main sequence galaxies. We start with the standard UVJ-based method to estimate dust extinction and specific star formation rate (sSFR). By replacing J with I band, a new calibration method suitable for use with ACS+WFC3 data is created (i.e. UVI diagram). Using a multi-wavelength multi-aperture photometry catalogue based on CANDELS, UVI colour profiles of 1328 galaxies are stacked in stellar mass and redshift bins. The resulting colour gradients, covering a radial range of 0.2--2.0 effective radii, increase strongly with galaxy mass and with global $A_V$. Colour gradient directions are nearly parallel to the Calzetti extinction vector, indicating that dust plays a more important role than stellar population variations. With our calibration, the resulting $A_V$ profiles fall much more slowly than stellar mass profiles over the measured radial range. sSFR gradients are nearly flat without central quenching signatures, except for $M_*>10^{10.5} M_{\odot}$, where central declines of 20--25 per cent are observed. Both sets of profiles agree well with previous radial sSFR and (continuum) $A_V$ measurements. They are also consistent with the sSFR profiles and, if assuming a radially constant gas-to-dust ratio, gas profiles in recent hydrodynamic models. We finally discuss the striking findings that SFR scales with stellar mass density in the inner parts of galaxies, and that dust content is high in the outer parts despite low stellar-mass surface densities there.
  • This paper introduces a simple principle for robust high-dimensional statistical inference via an appropriate shrinkage on the data. This widens the scope of high-dimensional techniques, reducing the moment conditions from sub-exponential or sub-Gaussian distributions to merely bounded second or fourth moment. As an illustration of this principle, we focus on robust estimation of the low-rank matrix $\Theta^*$ from the trace regression model $Y=Tr (\Theta^{*T}X) +\epsilon$. It encompasses four popular problems: sparse linear models, compressed sensing, matrix completion and multi-task regression. We propose to apply penalized least-squares approach to appropriately truncated or shrunk data. Under only bounded $2+\delta$ moment condition on the response, the proposed robust methodology yields an estimator that possesses the same statistical error rates as previous literature with sub-Gaussian errors. For sparse linear models and multi-tasking regression, we further allow the design to have only bounded fourth moment and obtain the same statistical rates, again, by appropriate shrinkage of the design matrix. As a byproduct, we give a robust covariance matrix estimator and establish its concentration inequality in terms of the spectral norm when the random samples have only bounded fourth moment. Extensive simulations have been carried out to support our theories.
  • The rest-frame UV-optical (i.e., NUV-B) color index is sensitive to the low-level recent star formation and dust extinction, but it is insensitive to the metallicity. In this Letter, we have measured the rest-frame NUV-B color gradients in ~1400 large ($\rm r_e>0.18^{\prime\prime}$), nearly face-on (b/a>0.5) main-sequence star-forming galaxies (SFGs) between redshift 0.5 and 1.5 in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields. With this sample, we study the origin of UV-optical color gradients in the SFGs at z~1 and discuss their link with the buildup of stellar mass. We find that the more massive, centrally compact, and more dust extinguished SFGs tend to have statistically more negative raw color gradients (redder centers) than the less massive, centrally diffuse, and less dusty SFGs. After correcting for dust reddening based on optical-SED fitting, the color gradients in the low-mass ($M_{\ast} <10^{10}M_{\odot}$) SFGs generally become quite flat, while most of the high-mass ($M_{\ast} > 10^{10.5}M_{\odot}$) SFGs still retain shallow negative color gradients. These findings imply that dust reddening is likely the principal cause of negative color gradients in the low-mass SFGs, while both increased central dust reddening and buildup of compact old bulges are likely the origins of negative color gradients in the high-mass SFGs. These findings also imply that at these redshifts the low-mass SFGs buildup their stellar masses in a self-similar way, while the high-mass SFGs grow inside out.
  • Heterogeneity is an unwanted variation when analyzing aggregated datasets from multiple sources. Though different methods have been proposed for heterogeneity adjustment, no systematic theory exists to justify these methods. In this work, we propose a generic framework named ALPHA (short for Adaptive Low-rank Principal Heterogeneity Adjustment) to model, estimate, and adjust heterogeneity from the original data. Once the heterogeneity is adjusted, we are able to remove the biases of batch effects and to enhance the inferential power by aggregating the homogeneous residuals from multiple sources. Under a pervasive assumption that the latent heterogeneity factors simultaneously affect a large fraction of observed variables, we provide a rigorous theory to justify the proposed framework. Our framework also allows the incorporation of informative covariates and appeals to the "Bless of Dimensionality". As an illustrative application of this generic framework, we consider a problem of estimating high-dimensional precision matrix for graphical model inference based on multiple datasets. We also provide thorough numerical studies on both synthetic datasets and a brain imaging dataset to demonstrate the efficacy of the developed theory and methods.
  • In this paper, we study robust covariance estimation under the approximate factor model with observed factors. We propose a novel framework to first estimate the initial joint covariance matrix of the observed data and the factors, and then use it to recover the covariance matrix of the observed data. We prove that once the initial matrix estimator is good enough to maintain the element-wise optimal rate, the whole procedure will generate an estimated covariance with desired properties. For data with only bounded fourth moments, we propose to use Huber loss minimization to give the initial joint covariance estimation. This approach is applicable to a much wider range of distributions, including sub-Gaussian and elliptical distributions. We also present an asymptotic result for Huber's M-estimator with a diverging parameter. The conclusions are demonstrated by extensive simulations and real data analysis.
  • This paper introduces a Projected Principal Component Analysis (Projected-PCA), which employs principal component analysis to the projected (smoothed) data matrix onto a given linear space spanned by covariates. When it applies to high-dimensional factor analysis, the projection removes noise components. We show that the unobserved latent factors can be more accurately estimated than the conventional PCA if the projection is genuine, or more precisely, when the factor loading matrices are related to the projected linear space. When the dimensionality is large, the factors can be estimated accurately even when the sample size is finite. We propose a flexible semiparametric factor model, which decomposes the factor loading matrix into the component that can be explained by subject-specific covariates and the orthogonal residual component. The covariates' effects on the factor loadings are further modeled by the additive model via sieve approximations. By using the newly proposed Projected-PCA, the rates of convergence of the smooth factor loading matrices are obtained, which are much faster than those of the conventional factor analysis. The convergence is achieved even when the sample size is finite and is particularly appealing in the high-dimension-low-sample-size situation. This leads us to developing nonparametric tests on whether observed covariates have explaining powers on the loadings and whether they fully explain the loadings. The proposed method is illustrated by both simulated data and the returns of the components of the S&P 500 index.
  • High-dimensional statistical tests often ignore correlations to gain simplicity and stability leading to null distributions that depend on functionals of correlation matrices such as their Frobenius norm and other $\ell_r$ norms. Motivated by the computation of critical values of such tests, we investigate the difficulty of estimation the functionals of sparse correlation matrices. Specifically, we show that simple plug-in procedures based on thresholded estimators of correlation matrices are sparsity-adaptive and minimax optimal over a large class of correlation matrices. Akin to previous results on functional estimation, the minimax rates exhibit an elbow phenomenon. Our results are further illustrated in simulated data as well as an empirical study of data arising in financial econometrics.
  • We derive the asymptotic distributions of the spiked eigenvalues and eigenvectors under a generalized and unified asymptotic regime, which takes into account the spike magnitude of leading eigenvalues, sample size, and dimensionality. This new regime allows high dimensionality and diverging eigenvalue spikes and provides new insights into the roles the leading eigenvalues, sample size, and dimensionality play in principal component analysis. The results are proven by a technical device, which swaps the role of rows and columns and converts the high-dimensional problems into low-dimensional ones. Our results are a natural extension of those in Paul (2007) to more general setting with new insights and solve the rates of convergence problems in Shen et al. (2013). They also reveal the biases of the estimation of leading eigenvalues and eigenvectors by using principal component analysis, and lead to a new covariance estimator for the approximate factor model, called shrinkage principal orthogonal complement thresholding (S-POET), that corrects the biases. Our results are successfully applied to outstanding problems in estimation of risks of large portfolios and false discovery proportions for dependent test statistics and are illustrated by simulation studies.
  • We proposed a general Principal Orthogonal complEment Thresholding (POET) framework for large-scale covariance matrix estimation based on an approximate factor model. A set of high level sufficient conditions for the procedure to achieve optimal rates of convergence under different matrix norms were brought up to better understand how POET works. Such a framework allows us to recover the results for sub-Gaussian in a more transparent way that only depends on the concentration properties of the sample covariance matrix. As a new theoretical contribution, for the first time, such a framework allows us to exploit conditional sparsity covariance structure for the heavy-tailed data. In particular, for the elliptical data, we proposed a robust estimator based on marginal and multivariate Kendall's tau to satisfy these conditions. In addition, conditional graphical model was also studied under the same framework. The technical tools developed in this paper are of general interest to high dimensional principal component analysis. Thorough numerical results were also provided to back up the developed theory.