• Bi$_{2}$Se$_{3}$ is a topological insulator whose unique properties result from topological surface states (TSS) in the band gap. Low energy ion scattering can determine the properties of the outermost few atomic layers of a solid. The deposition of Cs helps to reveal that the neutralization of Na$^{+}$ is larger when scattered from surface Se than from Bi. This is caused by the spatial redistribution of the conductive charges in the TSS, which are primarily positioned between the first and second atomic layers. This provides direct experimental evidence of the spatial distribution of the TSS electrons.
  • Bi(0001) films with thicknesses up to several bilayers (BLs) are grown on Se-terminated Bi$_2$Se$_3$(0001) surfaces, and low energy electron diffraction (LEED), low energy ion scattering (LEIS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to investigate the surface composition, topography and atomic structure. For a single deposited Bi BL, the lattice constant matches that of the substrate and the Bi atoms adjacent to the uppermost Se atoms are located at fcc-like sites. When a 2nd Bi bilayer is deposited, it is incommensurate with the substrate. As the thickness of the deposited Bi film increases further, the lattice parameter evolves to that of bulk Bi(0001). After annealing a multiple BL film at 120{\deg}C, the first commensurate Bi BL remains intact, but the additional BLs aggregate to form thicker islands of Bi. These results show that a single Bi BL on Bi$_2$Se$_3$ is a particularly stable structure. After annealing to 490{\deg}C, all of the excess Bi desorbs and the Se-terminated Bi$_2$Se$_3$ surface is restored.
  • Bi$_2$Se$_3$ and Bi$_2$Te$_3$, and these same surfaces covered with Bi films, are exposed to Br$_2$ and Cl$_2$ in ultra-high vacuum. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and low energy ion scattering (LEIS) are used to investigate the surface composition before and after halogen exposure. It is found that halogens do not stick, or are just weakly bonded, to the Se- or Te-terminated clean surfaces, and light annealing removes the adsorbates restoring the intact surfaces. In contrast, halogens dissociatively adsorb onto surfaces covered with an additional bilayer of Bi, having a p-doping effect. Annealing these halogen-covered surfaces at 130{\deg}C causes Bi atoms to be chemically etched away and the surface reverts to a Se- or Te-termination. This work shows how halogen adsorption and reaction can be used to modify the surface termination of such materials.
  • Bi$_2$Te$_3$ is a topological insulator whose unique properties result from topological surface states in the band gap. The neutralization of scattered low energy Na$^+$, which is sensitive to dipoles that induce inhomogeneities in the local surface potential, is larger when scattered from Te than from Bi, indicating an upwards dipole at the Te sites and a downwards dipole above Bi. These dipoles are caused by the spatial distribution of the conductive electrons in the topological surface states. This result demonstrates how this alkali ion scattering method can be applied to provide direct experimental evidence of the spatial distribution of electrons in filled surface states.
  • Impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS), which is a variation of low energy ion scattering (LEIS) that employs large scattering angles, is performed on Bi2Se3 surfaces prepared by ion bombardment and annealing (IBA). ICISS angular scans are collected experimentally and simulated numerically along the [120] and [-1 -2 0] azimuths, and the match of the positions of the flux peaks shows that the top three atomic layers are bulk-terminated. A newly observed feature is identified as a minimum in the multiple scattering background when the ion beam incidence is along a low index direction. Calculated scans as a function of scattering angle are employed to identify the behavior of flux peaks to show whether they originate from shadowing, blocking or both. This new method for analysis of large-angle LEIS data is shown to be useful for accurately investigating complex surface structures.
  • Bismuth Selenide (Bi$_{2}$Se$_{3}$) is a topological insulator (TI) with a structure consisting of stacked quintuple layers. Single crystal surfaces are commonly prepared by mechanical cleaving. This work explores the use of low energy Ar$^{+}$ ion bombardment and annealing (IBA) as an alternative method to produce reproducible and stable Bi$_{2}$Se$_{3}$ surfaces under ultra-high vacuum (UHV). It is found that a well-ordered surface can be prepared by a single cycle of 1 keV Ar$^{+}$ ion bombardment and 30 min of annealing. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and detailed low energy ion scattering (LEIS) measurements show no differences between IBA-prepared surfaces and those prepared by $\textit{in situ}$ cleaving in UHV. Analysis of the LEED patterns shows that the optimal annealing temperature is 450{\deg}C. Angular LEIS scans reveal the formation of surface Se vacancies when the annealing temperature exceeds 520{\deg}C.
  • Bismuth Selenide (Bi2Se3) is a topological insulator with a two-dimensional layered structure that enables clean and well-ordered surfaces to be prepared by cleaving. Although some studies have demonstrated that the cleaved surface is terminated with Se, as expected from the bulk crystal structure, other reports have indicated either a Bi- or mixed-termination. Low energy ion scattering (LEIS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used here to compare surfaces prepared by ex situ cleaving, in situ cleaving, and ion bombardment and annealing (IBA) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). Surfaces prepared by in situ cleaving and IBA are well ordered and Se-terminated. Ex situ cleaved samples could be either Se-terminated or Bi-rich, are less well ordered and have adsorbed contaminants. This suggests that a chemical reaction involving atmospheric contaminants, which may preferentially adsorb at surface defects, could contribute to the non-reproducibility of the termination.
  • Bismuth Selenide is a two-dimensional topological insulator material composed of stacked quintuple layers (QL). The layers are held together by a weak van der Waals force that enables surface preparation by cleaving. Low energy ion scattering experiments (LEIS) show that Bi2Se3 cleaved under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) has a Se-terminated structure that is consistent with cleaving between QLs. Comparison of experimental data to molecular dynamics simulations confirms the Se-termination and provides an estimate of the surface relaxation.
  • Rayleigh scattering generates intensity noise close to an optical carrier that propagates in a single-mode optical fiber. This noise degrades the performance of optoelectronic oscillators and RF-photonic links. When using a broad linewidth laser, we previously found that the intensity noise power scales linearly with optical power and fiber length, which is consistent with guided entropy mode Rayleigh scattering (GEMRS), a third order nonlinear scattering process, in the spontaneous limit. In this work, we show that this behavior changes significantly with the use of a narrow linewidth laser. Using a narrow linewidth laser, we measured the bandwidth of the intensity noise plateau to be 10 kHz. We found that the scattered noise power scales superlinearly with fiber length up to lengths of 10 km in the frequency range of 500 Hz to 10 kHz, while it scales linearly in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 Hz. These results suggest that the Rayleigh-scattering-induced intensity noise cannot be explained by third-order nonlinear scattering in the spontaneous limit, as previously hypothesized.
  • This paper reports the design and cold test of the cavity beam position monitor (CBPM) for SX-FEL to fulfill the requirement of beam position measurement resolution of less than 1{\mu}m, even 0.1{\mu}m. The CBPM was optimized by using a coupling slot to damp the TM010 mode in the output signal. The isolation of TM010 mode is about 117dB, and the shunt impedance is about 200{\Omega}@4.65GHz with the quality factor 80 from MAFIA simulation and test result. A special antenna was designed to load power for reducing excitation of other modes in the cavity. The resulting output power of TM110 mode was about 90mV/mm when the source was 6dBm, and the accomplishable minimum voltage was about 200{\mu}V. The resolution of the CBPM was about 0.1{\mu}m from the linear fitting result based on the cold test.
  • A new theoretical approach to 1:1 electrolytes at low temperature is developed, RPM and SAPM are studied with this approach, and their critical points of first order phase transition are calculated. The result is in very good agreement with that of recent MC simulations, in particular it shows that, for SAPM, both the critical temperature and critical density decrease with the increase of size asymmetry.
  • The original version of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox and the Klein paradox of Klein-Gordon (KG) equation are discussed to show the necessity of existence of antiparticle with its wavefunction being fixed unambiguously. No concept of "hole" is needed.
  • A particle is always not pure. It always contains hiding antiparticle ingredient which is the essence of special relativity. Accordingly, the Klein-Gordon (KG) equation and Dirac equation are restudied and compared with the Relativistic Stationary Schr\"odinger Equation (RSSE). When an electron is bound in a Hydrogenlike atom with pointlike nucleus having charge number $Z$, the critical value of $Z, Z_c$, equals to 137 in Dirac equation whereas $Z_c=\sqrt{M/\mu} (137)$ in RSSE with $M$ and $\mu$ being the total mass of atom and the reduced mass of the electron.
  • The Klein paradox of Klein-Gordon (KG) equation is discussed to show that KG equation is self-consistent even at one-particle level and the wave function for antiparticle is uniquely determined by the reasonable explanation of Klein paradox. No concept of ``hole'' is needed.
  • When a particle is in high speed or bound in the Coulomb potential of point nucleus, the variation of its mass can be ascribed to the variation of relative ratio of hiding antimatter to matter in the particle. At two limiting cases, the ratio approaches to 1.