• Luminous high-redshift quasars can be used to probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the early universe because their UV light is absorbed by the neutral hydrogen along the line of sight. They help us to measure the neutral hydrogen fraction of the high-z universe, shedding light on the end of reionization epoch. In this paper, we present a discovery of a new quasar (PSO J006.1240+39.2219) at redshift $z=6.61\pm0.02$ from Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1. Including this quasar, there are nine quasars above $z>6.5$ up to date. The estimated continuum brightness is $M_\text{1450}$=$-25.96\pm0.08$. PSO J006.1240+39.2219 has a strong Ly~$\alpha$ emission compared with typical low-redshift quasars, but the measured near-zone region size is $R_\text{NZ}=3.2\pm1.1$ proper megaparsecs, which is consistent with other quasars at z$\sim$6.
  • Jets and outflows are the first signposts of stellar birth. Emission in the H2 1-0S(1) line at 2.122 micron is a powerful tracer of shock excitation in these objects. Here we present the analysis of 2.0 x 0.8 square degrees data from the UK Widefield Infrared Survey for H2 (UWISH2) in the 1-0S(1) line to identify and characterize the outflows of the M17 complex. We uncover 48 probable outflows, of which, 93 per cent are new discoveries. We identified driving source candidates for 60 per cent of the outflows. Among the driving source candidate YSOs: 90 per cent are protostars and the reminder 10 per cent are Class II YSOs. Comparing with results from other surveys, we suggest that H2 emission fades very quickly as the objects evolve from protostars to pre-main-sequence stars. We fit SED models to 14 candidate outflow driving sources and conclude that the outflows of our sample are mostly driven by moderate-mass YSOs that are still actively accreting from their protoplanetary disc. We examined the spatial distribution of the outflows with the gas and dust distribution of the complex, and observed that the filamentary dark-cloud "M17SWex" located at the south-western side of the complex, is associated with a greater number of outflows. We find our results corroborate previous suggestions, that in the M17 complex, M17SWex is the most active site of star formation. Several of our newly identified outflow candidates are excellent targets for follow up studies to better understand very early phase of protostellar evolution.
  • The formation and properties of star clusters formed at the edges of H II regions are poorly known. We study stellar content, physical conditions, and star formation processes around a relatively unknown young H II region IRAS 10427-6032, located in the southern outskirts of the Carina Nebula. We make use of near-IR data from VISTA, mid-IR from Spitzer and WISE, far-IR from Herschel, sub-mm from ATLASGAL, and 843 MHz radio-continuum data. Using multi-band photometry, we find a total of 5 Class I and 29 Class II young stellar object (YSO) candidates, most of which newly identified, in the 5'$\times$5' region centered on the IRAS source position. Modeling of the spectral energy distribution for selected YSO candidates using radiative transfer models shows that most of these candidates are intermediate mass YSOs in their early evolutionary stages. A majority of the YSO candidates are found to be coincident with the cold dense clump at the western rim of the H II region. Lyman continuum luminosity calculation using radio emission indicates the spectral type of the ionizing source to be earlier than B0.5-B1. We identified a candidate massive star possibly responsible for the H II region with an estimated spectral type B0-B0.5. The temperature and column density maps of the region constructed by performing pixel-wise modified blackbody fits to the thermal dust emission using the far-IR data show a high column density shell-like morphology around the H II region, and low column density (0.6 $\times$ 10$^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$) and high temperature ($\sim$21 K) matter within the H II region. Based on the morphology of the region in the ionized and the molecular gas, and the comparison between the estimated timescales of the H II region and the YSO candidates in the clump, we argue that the enhanced star-formation at the western rim of the H II region is likely due to compression by the ionized gas.
  • We analyze results from the first eighteen months of monthly sub-mm monitoring of eight star-forming regions in the JCMT Transient Survey. In our search for stochastic variability in 1643 bright peaks, only the previously identified source, EC53, shows behavior well above the expected measurement uncertainty. Another four sources, two disks and two protostars, show moderately-enhanced standard deviations in brightness, as expected for stochastic variables. For the two protostars, this apparent variability is the result of single epochs that are much brighter than the mean. In our search for secular brightness variations that are linear in time, we measure the fractional brightness change per year for 150 bright peaks, fifty of which are protostellar. The ensemble distribution of slopes is well fit by a normal distribution with sigma ~ 0.023. Most sources are not rapidly brightening or fading in the sub-mm. Comparison against time-randomized realizations shows that the width of the distribution is dominated by the uncertainty in the individual brightness measurements of the sources. A toy model for secular variability reveals that an underlying Gaussian distribution of linear fractional brightness change sigma = 0.005 would be unobservable in the present sample, whereas an underlying distribution with sigma = 0.02 is ruled out. Five protostellar sources, 10% of the protostellar sample, are found to have robust secular measures deviating from a constant flux. The sensitivity to secular brightness variations will improve significantly with a larger time sample, with a factor of two improvement expected by the conclusion of our 36-month survey.
  • The variability of young stellar objects is mostly driven by star-disk interactions. In long-term photometric monitoring of the accreting T Tauri star GI Tau, we detect extinction events with typical depths of $\Delta V \sim 2.5$ mag that last for days-to-months and often appear to occur stochastically. In 2014 - 2015, extinctions that repeated with a quasi-period of 21 days over several months is the first empirical evidence of slow warps predicted from MHD simulations to form at a few stellar radii away from the central star. The reddening is consistent with $R_V=3.85\pm0.5$ and, along with an absence of diffuse interstellar bands, indicates that some dust processing has occurred in the disk. The 2015 -- 2016 multi-band lightcurve includes variations in spot coverage, extinction, and accretion, each of which results in different traces in color-magnitude diagrams. This lightcurve is initially dominated by a month-long extinction event and return to the unocculted brightness. The subsequent light-curve then features spot modulation with a 7.03 day period, punctuated by brief, randomly-spaced extinction events. The accretion rate measured from $U$-band photometry ranges from $1.3\times10^{-8}$ to $1.1\times10^{-10}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ (excluding the highest and lowest 5% of high- and low- accretion rate outliers), with an average of $4.7 \times 10^{-9}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. A total of 50% of the mass is accreted during bursts of $>12.8\times10^{-9}$ M$_\odot$ yr${^{-1}}$, which indicates limitations on analyses of disk evolution using single-epoch accretion rates.
  • We present optical and near-infrared stellar polarization observations toward the dark filamentary clouds associated with IC5146. The data allow us to investigate the dust properties (this paper) and the magnetic field structure (Paper II). A total of 2022 background stars were detected in $R_{c}$-, $i'$-, $H$-, and/or $K$-bands to $A_V \lesssim 25$ mag. The ratio of the polarization percentage at different wavelengths provides an estimate of $\lambda_{max}$, the wavelength of peak polarization, which is an indicator of the small-size cutoff of the grain size distribution. The grain size distribution seems to significantly change at $A_V \sim$ 3 mag, where both the average and dispersion of $P_{R_c}/P_{H}$ decrease. In addition, we found $\lambda_{max}$ $\sim$ 0.6-0.9 $\mu$m for $A_V>2.5$ mag, which is larger than the $\sim$ 0.55 $\mu$m in the general ISM, suggesting that grain growth has already started in low $A_V$ regions. Our data also reveal that polarization efficiency (PE $\equiv P_{\lambda}/A_V$) decreases with $A_V$ as a power-law in $R_c$-, $i'$-, and $K$-bands with indices of -0.71$\pm$0.10, -1.23$\pm$0.10 and -0.53$\pm$0.09. However, $H$-band data show a power index change; the PE varies with $A_V$ steeply (index of -0.95$\pm$0.30) when $A_V < 2.88\pm0.67$ mag but softly (index of -0.25$\pm$0.06) for greater $A_V$ values. The soft decay of PE in high $A_V$ regions is consistent with the Radiative Aligned Torque model, suggesting that our data trace the magnetic field to $A_V \sim 20$ mag. Furthermore, the breakpoint found in $H$-band is similar to the $A_V$ where we found the $P_{R_c}/P_{H}$ dispersion significantly decreased. Therefore, the flat PE-$A_V$ in high $A_V$ regions implies that the power index changes result from additional grain growth.
  • Investigating variability at the earliest stages of low-mass star formation is fundamental in understanding how a protostar assembles mass. While many simulations of protostellar disks predict non-steady accretion onto protostars, deeper investigation requires robust observational constraints on the frequency and amplitude of variability events characterised across the observable SED. In this study, we develop methods to robustly analyse repeated observations of an area of the sky for submillimetre variability in order to determine constraints on the magnitude and frequency of deeply embedded protostars. We compare \mbox{850 $\mu$m} JCMT Transient Survey data with archival JCMT Gould Belt Survey data to investigate variability over 2-4 year timescales. Out of 175 bright, independent emission sources identified in the overlapping fields, we find 7 variable candidates, 5 of which we classify as \textit{Strong} and the remaining 2 as \textit{Extended} to indicate the latter are associated with larger-scale structure. For the \textit{Strong} variable candidates, we find an average fractional peak brightness change per year of |4.0|\% yr$^{-1}$ with a standard deviation of $2.7\%\mathrm{\:yr}^{-1}$. In total, 7\% of the protostars associated with \mbox{850 $\mu$m} emission in our sample show signs of variability. Four of the five \textit{Strong} sources are associated with a known protostar. The remaining source is a good follow-up target for an object that is anticipated to contain an enshrouded, deeply embedded protostar. In addition, we estimate the \mbox{850 $\mu$m} periodicity of the submillimetre variable source, EC 53, to be \mbox{567 $\pm$ 32 days} based on the archival Gould Belt Survey data.
  • The influence of magnetic fields (B-fields) in the formation and evolution of bipolar bubbles, due to the expanding ionization fronts (I-fronts) driven by the Hii regions that are formed and embedded in filamentary molecular clouds, has not been well-studied yet. In addition to the anisotropic expansion of I-fronts into a filament, B-fields are expected to introduce an additional anisotropic pressure which might favor expansion and propagation of I-fronts to form a bipolar bubble. We present results based on near-infrared polarimetric observations towards the central $\sim$8'$\times$8' area of the star-forming region RCW57A which hosts an Hii region, a filament, and a bipolar bubble. Polarization measurements of 178 reddened background stars, out of the 919 detected sources in the JHKs-bands, reveal B-fields that thread perpendicular to the filament long axis. The B-fields exhibit an hour-glass morphology that closely follows the structure of the bipolar bubble. The mean B-field strength, estimated using the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method, is 91$\pm$8 {\mu}G. B-field pressure dominates over turbulent and thermal pressures. Thermal pressure might act in the same orientation as those of B-fields to accelerate the expansion of those I-fronts. The observed morphological correspondence among the B-fields, filament, and bipolar bubble demonstrate that the B-fields are important to the cloud contraction that formed the filament, gravitational collapse and star formation in it, and in feedback processes. The latter include the formation and evolution of mid-infrared bubbles by means of B-field supported propagation and expansion of I-fronts. These may shed light on preexisting conditions favoring the formation of the massive stellar cluster in RCW57A.
  • Most protostars have luminosities that are fainter than expected from steady accretion over the protostellar lifetime. The solution to this problem may lie in episodic mass accretion -- prolonged periods of very low accretion punctuated by short bursts of rapid accretion. However, the timescale and amplitude for variability at the protostellar phase is almost entirely unconstrained. In "A JCMT/SCUBA-2 Transient Survey of Protostars in Nearby Star Forming Regions", we are monitoring monthly with SCUBA-2 the sub-mm emission in eight fields within nearby (<500 pc) star forming regions to measure the accretion variability of protostars. The total survey area of ~1.6 sq.deg. includes ~105 peaks with peaks brighter than 0.5 Jy/beam (43 associated with embedded protostars or disks) and 237 peaks of 0.125-0.5 Jy/beam (50 with embedded protostars or disks). Each field has enough bright peaks for flux calibration relative to other peaks in the same field, which improves upon the nominal flux calibration uncertainties of sub-mm observations to reach a precision of ~2-3% rms, and also provides quantified confidence in any measured variability. The timescales and amplitudes of any sub-mm variation will then be converted into variations in accretion rate and subsequently used to infer the physical causes of the variability. This survey is the first dedicated survey for sub-mm variability and complements other transient surveys at optical and near-IR wavelengths, which are not sensitive to accretion variability of deeply embedded protostars.
  • We present the analysis of the morphological shape of Berkeley 17, the oldest known open cluster (~10 Gyr), using a probabilistic star counting of Pan-STARRS point sources, and confirm its core-tail shape, plus an antitail, previously detected with the 2MASS data. The stellar population, as diagnosed by the color-magnitude diagram and theoretical isochrones, shows many massive members in the cluster core, whereas there is a paucity of such members in both tails. This manifests mass segregation in this aged star cluster with the low-mass members being stripped away from the system. It has been claimed that Berkeley 17 is associated with an excessive number of blue straggler candidates. Comparison of nearby reference fields indicates that about half of these may be field contamination.
  • We make use of a catalog of 1600 Pan-STARRS1 groups produced by the probability friends-of-friends algorithm to explore how the galaxy properties, i.e. the specific star formation rate (SSFR) and quiescent fraction, depend on stellar mass and group-centric radius. The work is the extension of Lin et al. (2014). In this work, powered by a stacking technique plus a background subtraction for contamination removal, a finer correction and more precise results are obtained than in our previous work. We find that while the quiescent fraction increases with decreasing group-centric radius the median SSFRs of star-forming galaxies in groups at fixed stellar mass drop slightly from the field toward the group center. This suggests that the major quenching process in groups is likely a fast mechanism. On the other hand, a reduction in SSFRs by ~0.2 dex is seen inside clusters as opposed to the field galaxies. If the reduction is attributed to the slow quenching effect, the slow quenching process acts dominantly in clusters. In addition, we also examine the density-color relation, where the density is defined by using a sixth-nearest neighbor approach. Comparing the quiescent fractions contributed from the density and radial effect, we find that the density effect dominates over the massive group or cluster galaxies, and the radial effect becomes more effective in less massive galaxies. The results support mergers and/or starvation as the main quenching mechanisms in the group environment, while harassment and/or starvation dominate in clusters.
  • Distant luminous quasars provide important information on the growth of the first supermassive black holes, their host galaxies and the epoch of reionization. The identification of quasars is usually performed through detection of their Lyman-$\alpha$ line redshifted to $\sim$ 0.9 microns at z>6.5. Here, we report the discovery of a very Lyman-$\alpha$ luminous quasar, PSO J006.1240+39.2219 at redshift z=6.618, selected based on its red colour and multi-epoch detection of the Lyman-$\alpha$ emission in a single near-infrared band. The Lyman-$\alpha$-line luminosity of PSO J006.1240+39.2219 is unusually high and estimated to be 0.8$\times$10$^{12}$ Solar luminosities (about 3% of the total quasar luminosity). The Lyman-$\alpha$ emission of PSO J006.1240+39.2219 shows fast variability on timescales of days in the quasar rest frame, which has never been detected in any of the known high-redshift quasars. The high luminosity of the Lyman-$\alpha$ line, its narrow width and fast variability resemble properties of local Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies which suggests that the quasar is likely at the active phase of the black hole growth accreting close or even beyond the Eddington limit.
  • Apollo-type NEA (3200) Phaethon, classified at the B/F-type taxonomy, probably the main mass of the Phaethon-Geminid stream complex (PGC), can be the most metamorphic C-complex asteroid in our solar system, since it is heated up to ~1000 K by the solar radiation around its perihelion passages. Hence, its surface material may be easily decomposed in near-sun environment. Phaethon's spectrum exhibits extremely blue-slope in the VIS-NIR region (so-called Phaethon Blue). Another candidate large member of the PGC, (155140) 2005 UD, shows a B/F-type color, however with a C-type-like red color over its ~1/4 rotational part, which implies an exposition of less metamorphosed primordial internal structure of the PGC precursor by a splitting or breakup event long ago. If so, some rotational part of Phaethon should show the C-type color as well as 2005 UD. Hence, we carried out the time-series VIS-spectroscopic observations of Phaethon using 1-m telescope in order to detect such a signature. Also, R-band photometries were simultaneously performed in order to complement our spectroscopy. Consequently, we obtained a total of 68 VIS-spectrophotometric data, 78% of which show the B-type blue-color, as against the rest of 22% showing the C-type red-color. We successfully acquired rotationally time-resolved spectroscopic data, of which particular rotational phase shows a red-spectral slope as the C-type color, as 2005 UD does, suggesting longitudinal inhomogeneity on Phaethon's surface. We constrained this C-type red-colored area in the mid-latitude in Phaethon's southern hemisphere based on the rotationally time-resolved spectroscopy along with Phaethon's axial rotation state, of which size suggests the impact-induced origin of the PGC. We also surveyed the meteoritic analog of Phaethon's surface blue-color, and found thermally metamorphosed CI/CM chondrites as likely candidates.
  • We observed RZ LMi, which is renowned for the extremely (~19d) short supercycle and is a member of a small, unusual class of cataclysmic variables called ER UMa-type dwarf novae, in 2013 and 2016. In 2016, the supercycles of this object substantially lengthened in comparison to the previous measurements to 35, 32, 60d for three consecutive superoutbursts. We consider that the object virtually experienced a transition to the novalike state (permanent superhumper). This observed behavior extremely well reproduced the prediction of the thermal-tidal instability model. We detected a precursor in the 2016 superoutburst and detected growing (stage A) superhumps with a mean period of 0.0602(1)d in 2016 and in 2013. Combined with the period of superhumps immediately after the superoutburst, the mass ratio is not as small as in WZ Sge-type dwarf novae, having orbital periods similar to RZ LMi. By using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) two-dimensional power spectra, we detected possible negative superhumps with a period of 0.05710(1)d. We estimated the orbital period of 0.05792d, which suggests a mass ratio of 0.105(5). This relatively large mass ratio is even above ordinary SU UMa-type dwarf novae, and it is also possible that the exceptionally high mass-transfer rate in RZ LMi may be a result of a stripped core evolved secondary which are evolving toward an AM CVn-type object.
  • Although the majority of Centaurs are thought to have originated in the scattered disk, with the high-inclination members coming from the Oort cloud, the origin of the high inclination component of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) remains uncertain. We report the discovery of a retrograde TNO, which we nickname "Niku", detected by the Pan-STARRS 1 Outer Solar System Survey. Our numerical integrations show that the orbital dynamics of Niku are very similar to that of 2008 KV$_{42}$ (Drac), with a half-life of $\sim 500$ Myr. Comparing similar high inclination TNOs and Centaurs ($q > 10$ AU, $a < 100$ AU and $i > 60^\circ$), we find that these objects exhibit a surprising clustering of ascending node, and occupy a common orbital plane. This orbital configuration has high statistical significance: 3.8-$\sigma$. An unknown mechanism is required to explain the observed clustering. This discovery may provide a pathway to investigate a possible reservoir of high-inclination objects.
  • How black holes accrete surrounding matter is a fundamental, yet unsolved question in astrophysics. It is generally believed that matter is absorbed into black holes via accretion disks, the state of which depends primarily on the mass-accretion rate. When this rate approaches the critical rate (the Eddington limit), thermal instability is supposed to occur in the inner disc, causing repetitive patterns of large-amplitude X-ray variability (oscillations) on timescales of minutes to hours. In fact, such oscillations have been observed only in sources with a high mass accretion rate, such as GRS 1915+105. These large-amplitude, relatively slow timescale, phenomena are thought to have physical origins distinct from X-ray or optical variations with small amplitudes and fast ($\lesssim$10 sec) timescales often observed in other black hole binaries (e.g., XTE J1118+480 and GX 339-4). Here we report an extensive multi-colour optical photometric data set of V404 Cygni, an X-ray transient source containing a black hole of nine solar masses (and a conpanion star) at a distance of 2.4 kiloparsecs. Our data show that optical oscillations on timescales of 100 seconds to 2.5 hours can occur at mass-accretion rates more than ten times lower than previously thought. This suggests that the accretion rate is not the critical parameter for inducing inner-disc instabilities. Instead, we propose that a long orbital period is a key condition for these large-amplitude oscillations, because the outer part of the large disc in binaries with long orbital periods will have surface densities too low to maintain sustained mass accretion to the inner part of the disc. The lack of sustained accretion -- not the actual rate -- would then be the critical factor causing large-amplitude oscillations in long-period systems.
  • A variety of methods have been proposed to define and to quantify galaxy environments. While these techniques work well in general with spectroscopic redshift samples, their application to photometric redshift surveys remains uncertain. To investigate whether galaxy environments can be robustly measured with photo-z samples, we quantify how the density measured with the nearest neighbor approach is affected by photo-z uncertainties by using the Durham mock galaxy catalogs in which the 3D real-space environments and the properties of galaxies are exactly known. Furthermore, we present an optimization scheme in the choice of parameters used in the 2D projected measurements which yield the tightest correlation with respect to the 3D real-space environments. By adopting the optimized parameters in the density measurements, we show that the correlation between the 2D projected optimized density and real-space density can still be revealed, and the color-density relation is also visible out to $z \sim 0.8$ even for a photo-z uncertainty ($\sigma_{\Delta_{z}/(1+z)}$) up to 0.06. We find that at the redshift $0.3 < z < 0.5$ a deep ($i \sim 25$) photometric redshift survey with $\sigma_{\Delta_{z}/(1+z)} = 0.02$ yields a comparable performance of small-scale density measurement to a shallower $i \sim$ 22.5 spectroscopic sample with $\sim$ 10% sampling rate. Finally, we discuss the application of the local density measurements to the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep survey, one of the largest deep optical imaging surveys. Using data from $\sim5$ square degrees of survey area, our results show that it is possible to measure local density and to probe the color-density relation with 3$\sigma$ confidence level out to $z \sim 0.8$ in the PS-MDS. The color-density relation, however, quickly degrades for data covering smaller areas.
  • We present monitoring observations of the active T Tauri star RW Aur, from 2010 October to 2015 January, using optical high-resolution (R>10000) spectroscopy with CFHT-ESPaDOnS. Optical photometry in the literature shows bright, stable fluxes over most of this period, with lower fluxes (by 2-3 mag.) in 2010 and 2014. In the bright period our spectra show clear photospheric absorption, complicated variation in the Ca II 8542 A emission}profile shapes, and a large variation in redshifted absorption in the O I 7772 and 8446 A and He I 5876 A lines, suggesting unstable mass accretion during this period. In contrast, these line profiles are relatively uniform during the faint periods, suggesting stable mass accretion. During the faint periods the photospheric absorption lines are absent or marginal, and the averaged Li I profile shows redshifted absorption due to an inflow. We discuss (1) occultation by circumstellar material or a companion and (2) changes in the activity of mass accretion to explain the above results, together with near-infrared and X-ray observations from 2011-2015. Neither scenario can simply explain all the observed trends, and more theoretical work is needed to further investigate their feasibilities.
  • We report the discovery of 2 new Be stars, and re-identify one known Be star in the open cluster NGC 6830. Eleven H-alpha emitters were discovered using the H-alpha imaging photometry of the Palomar Transient Factory Survey. Stellar membership of the candidates was verified with photometric and kinematic information using 2MASS data and proper motions. The spectroscopic confirmation was carried out by using the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick observatory. Based on their spectral types, three H-alpha emitters were confirmed as Be stars with H-alpha equivalent widths > -10 Angstrom. Two objects were also observed by the new spectrograph SED-Machine on the Palomar 60 inch Telescope. The SED-Machine results show strong H-alpha emission lines, which are consistent with the results of the Lick observations. The high efficiency of the SED-Machine can provide rapid observations for Be stars in a comprehensive survey in the future.
  • We present the first study of the masses and decay constants of the pseudoscalar $ D $ mesons in two flavors lattice QCD with domain-wall fermion. The gauge ensembles are generated on the $24^3 \times 48 $ lattice with the extent $ N_s = 16 $ in the fifth dimension, and the plaquette gauge action at $ \beta = 6.10 $, for three sea-quark masses with corresponding pion masses in the range $260-475$ MeV. We compute the point-to-point quark propagators, and measure the time-correlation functions of the pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The inverse lattice spacing is determined by the Wilson flow, while the strange and the charm quark masses by the masses of the vector mesons $ \phi(1020) $ and $ J/\psi(3097) $ respectively. Using heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMChPT) to extrapolate to the physical pion mass, we obtain $ f_D = 202.3(2.2)(2.6) $ MeV and $ f_{D_s} = 258.7(1.1)(2.9) $ MeV.
  • Using a large sample of field and group galaxies drawn from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey, we present the specific star formation rate (SSFR) - stellar mass (M*) relation, as well as the quiescent fraction versus M* relation in different environments. We confirm that the fraction of quiescent galaxies is strongly dependent on environment at a fixed stellar mass, but that the amplitude and the slope of the star-forming sequence is similar between the field and groups: in other words, the SSFR-density relation at a fixed stellar mass is primarily driven by the change in the star-forming and quiescent fractions between different environments rather than a global suppression in the star formation rate for the star-forming population. However, when we restrict our sample to the cluster-scale environments ($M>10^{14}M_{solar}$), we find a global reduction in the SSFR of the star forming sequence of $17\%$ at 4$\sigma$ confidence as opposed to its field counterpart. After removing the stellar mass dependence of the quiescent fraction seen in field galaxies, the excess in the quiescent fraction due to the environment quenching in groups and clusters is found to increase with stellar mass. We argue that these results are in favor of galaxy mergers to be the primary environment quenching mechanism operating in galaxy groups whereas strangulation is able to reproduce the observed trend in the environment quenching efficiency and stellar mass relation seen in clusters. Our results also suggest that the relative importance between mass quenching and environment quenching depends on stellar mass -- the mass quenching plays a dominant role in producing quiescent galaxies for more massive galaxies, while less massive galaxies are quenched mostly through the environmental effect, with the transition mass around $1-2\times10^{10}M_{solar}$ in the group/cluster environment. (abridged)
  • We study the restoration of the spontaneously broken chiral symmetry and the anomalously broken axial U(1) symmetry in finite temperature QCD at zero chemical potential. We use 2 flavors lattice QCD with optimal domain-wall fermion on the $ 16^3 \times 6 $ lattice, with the extent $ N_s = 16 $ in the fifth dimension, in the temperature range $ T = 130-230 $ MeV. To examine the restoration of the chiral symmetry and the axial $ U(1) $ symmetry, we use diluted $ Z_2 $ noises to calculate the chiral condensate, and the chiral susceptibilities in the scalar and pseudoscalar meson channels, for flavor singlet and non-singlet respectively. From the degeneracy of the chiral susceptibilities around $ T_c $, it suggests that the axial $ U(1) $ symmetry is restored in the chirally symmetric phase. Moreover, we examine the spectral density $ \rho(\lambda_c) $ of the 4D effective Dirac operator with exact chiral symmetry, which is obtained by computing zero modes plus (180+180) conjugate pairs of low-lying modes for each gauge configuration. The suppression of low modes in the spectral density provides a consistency check of the restoration of axial $ U(1) $ symmetry in the chirally symmetric phase.
  • We present optical spectrophotometric monitoring of four active T Tauri stars (DG Tau, RY Tau, XZ Tau, RW Aur A) at high spectral resolution ($R \ga 1 \times 10^4$), to investigate the correlation between time variable mass ejection seen in the jet/wind structure of the driving source and time variable mass accretion probed by optical emission lines. This may allow us to constrain the understanding of the jet/wind launching mechanism, the location of the launching region, and the physical link with magnetospheric mass accretion. In 2010, observations were made at six different epochs to investigate how daily and monthly variability might affect such a study. We perform comparisons between the line profiles we observed and those in the literature over a period of decades and confirm the presence of time variability separate from the daily and monthly variability during our observations. This is so far consistent with the idea that these line profiles have a long term variability (3-20 years) related to episodic mass ejection suggested by the structures in the extended flow components. We also investigate the correlations between equivalent widths and between luminosities for different lines. We find that these correlations are consistent with the present paradigm of steady magnetospheric mass accretion and emission line regions that are close to the star.
  • We report on analysis of 308.3 hrs of high speed photometry targeting the pulsating DA white dwarf EC14012-1446. The data were acquired with the Whole Earth Telescope (WET) during the 2008 international observing run XCOV26. The Fourier transform of the light curve contains 19 independent frequencies and numerous combination frequencies. The dominant peaks are 1633.907, 1887.404, and 2504.897 microHz. Our analysis of the combination amplitudes reveals that the parent frequencies are consistent with modes of spherical degree l=1. The combination amplitudes also provide m identifications for the largest amplitude parent frequencies. Our seismology analysis, which includes 2004--2007 archival data, confirms these identifications, provides constraints on additional frequencies, and finds an average period spacing of 41 s. Building on this foundation, we present nonlinear fits to high signal-to-noise light curves from the SOAR 4.1m, McDonald 2.1m, and KPNO 2m telescopes. The fits indicate a time-averaged convective response timescale of 99.4 +/- 17 s, a temperature exponent 85 +/- 6.2 and an inclination angle of 32.9 +/- 3.2 degrees. We present our current empirical map of the convective response timescale across the DA instability strip.
  • We present observations of comet-like main-belt object P/2010 R2 (La Sagra) obtained by Pan-STARRS 1 and the Faulkes Telescope-North on Haleakala in Hawaii, the University of Hawaii 2.2 m, Gemini-North, and Keck I telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Danish 1.54 m telescope at La Silla, and the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma. An antisolar dust tail is observed from August 2010 through February 2011, while a dust trail aligned with the object's orbit plane is also observed from December 2010 through August 2011. Assuming typical phase darkening behavior, P/La Sagra is seen to increase in brightness by >1 mag between August 2010 and December 2010, suggesting that dust production is ongoing over this period. These results strongly suggest that the observed activity is cometary in nature (i.e., driven by the sublimation of volatile material), and that P/La Sagra is therefore the most recent main-belt comet to be discovered. We find an approximate absolute magnitude for the nucleus of H_R=17.9+/-0.2 mag, corresponding to a nucleus radius of ~0.7 km, assuming an albedo of p=0.05. Using optical spectroscopy, we find no evidence of sublimation products (i.e., gas emission), finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q_CN<6x10^23 mol/s, from which we infer an H2O production rate of Q_H2O<10^26 mol/s. Numerical simulations indicate that P/La Sagra is dynamically stable for >100 Myr, suggesting that it is likely native to its current location and that its composition is likely representative of other objects in the same region of the main belt, though the relatively close proximity of the 13:6 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and the (3,-2,-1) three-body mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and Saturn mean that dynamical instability on larger timescales cannot be ruled out.