• Direct-gap materials hold promises for excitonic insulator. In contrast to indirect-gap materials, here the difficulty to distinguish from a Peierls charge density wave is circumvented. However, direct-gap materials still suffer from the divergence of polarizability when the band gap approaches zero, leading to diminishing exciton binding energy. We propose that one can decouple the exciton binding energy from the band gap in materials where band-edge states have the same parity. First-principles calculations of two-dimensional GaAs and experimentally mechanically exfoliated single-layer TiS 3 lend solid supports to the new principle.
  • Thermal engineering of quantum devices has attracted much attention since the discovery of quantized thermal conductance of phonons. Although easily submerged in numerous excitations in macro-systems, quantum behaviors of phonons manifest in nanoscale low-dimensional systems even at room temperature. Especially in nano transport devices, phonons move quasi-ballistically when the transport length is smaller than their bulk mean free paths. It has been shown that phonon nonequilibrium Green's function method (NEGF) is effective for the investigation of nanoscale quantum transport of phonons. In this tutorial review two aspects of thermal engineering of quantum devices are discussed using NEGF methods. One covers transport properties of pure phonons; the other concerns the caloritronic effects, which manipulate other degrees of freedom, such as charge, spin, and valley, via the temperature gradient. For each part, we outline basic theoretical formalisms first, then provide a survey on related investigations on models or realistic materials. Particular attention is given to phonon topologies and a generalized phonon NEGF method. Finally, we conclude our review and summarize with an outlook.
  • Topological semimetals (TSMs) in which conduction and valence bands cross at zero-dimensional (0D) Dirac nodal points (DNPs) or 1D Dirac nodal lines (DNLs), in 3D momentum space, have recently drawn much attention due to their exotic electronic properties. Here we generalize the TSM state further to a higher-symmetry and higher-dimensional Dirac nodal sphere (DNS), with the band crossing points forming a 2D closed sphere around the Fermi level. Based on the k*p model, we demonstrate two possible types of such novel DNS fermionic states underlied by different crystalline symmetries, whose topologies are well defined by two different topological invariants. We identify all the possible band crossings with pairs of 1D irreducible representations to form the DNS states in 32 point groups. Importantly, we discover that metal hydrides MH3 (M= Y, Ho, Tb, Nd) and Si3N2 are ideal candidates to realize these two types of DNS states under certain strains. Furthermore, we show that the DNS semimetal is characterized by drumhead surface states independent of surface orientations, which are distinctly different from the DNP or DNL semimetals. As a high-symmetry-required state, the DNS semimetal can be regarded as the "parent phase" for other topological gapped and gapless states.
  • Density functional theory (DFT) can run into serious difficulties with localized states in elements such as transition metals with occupied-d states and oxygen. In contrast, Hartree-Fock (HF) method can be a better approach for such localized states. Here, we develop HF pseudopotentials to be used alongside with DFT for solids. The computation cost is on par with standard DFT. Calculations for a range of II-VI, III-V and group-IV semiconductors with diverse physical properties show observably improved band gap for systems containing d-electrons, whereby pointing to a new direction in electronic theory.
  • The modern semiclassical theory of a Bloch electron in a magnetic field now encompasses the orbital magnetic moment and the geometric phase. These two notions are encoded in the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition as a phase ($\lambda$) that is subleading in powers of the field; $\lambda$ is measurable in the phase offset of the de Haas-van Alphen oscillation, as well as of fixed-bias oscillations of the differential conductance in tunneling spectroscopy. In some solids and for certain field orientations, $\lambda/\pi$ are robustly integer-valued owing to the symmetry of the extremal orbit, i.e., they are the topological invariants of magnetotransport. Our comprehensive symmetry analysis identifies solids in any (magnetic) space group for which $\lambda$ is a topological invariant, as well as identifies the symmetry-enforced degeneracy of Landau levels. The analysis is simplified by our formulation of ten (and only ten) symmetry classes for closed, Fermi-surface orbits. Case studies are discussed for graphene, transition metal dichalchogenides, 3D Weyl and Dirac metals, and crystalline and $\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological insulators. In particular, we point out that a $\pi$ phase offset in the fundamental oscillation should \emph{not} be viewed as a smoking gun for a 3D Dirac metal.
  • A key challenge in manipulating the magnetization in heavy-metal/ferromagnetic bilayers via the spin-orbit torque is to identify materials that exhibit an efficient charge-to-spin current conversion. Ab initio electronic structure calculations reveal that the intrinsic spin Hall conductivity (SHC) for pristine $\beta$-W is about sixty percent larger than that of $\alpha$-W. More importantly, we demonstrate that the SHC of $\beta$-W can be enhanced via Ta alloying. This is corroborated by spin Berry curvature calculations of W$_{1-x}$Ta$_x$ ($x$ $\sim$ 12.5%) alloys which show a giant enhancement of spin Hall angle of up to $\approx$ $-0.5$. The underlying mechanism is the synergistic behavior of the SHC and longitudinal conductivity with Fermi level position. These findings, not only pave the way for enhancing the intrinsic spin Hall effect in $\beta$-W, but also provide new guidelines to exploit substitutional alloying to tailor the spin Hall effect in various materials.
  • The search for exotic topological effects of phonons has attracted enormous interest for both fundamental science and practical applications. By studying phonons in a Kekul\'e lattice, we find a new type of pseudospins characterized by quantized Berry phases and pseudoangular momenta, which introduces various novel topological effects, including topologically protected pseudospin-polarized interface states and a phonon pseudospin Hall effect. We further demonstrate a pseudospin-contrasting optical selection rule and a pseudospin Zeeman effect, giving a complete generation-manipulation-detection paradigm of the phonon pseudospin. The pseudospin and topology-related physics revealed for phonons is general and applicable for electrons, photons and other particles.
  • We have investigated the effect of transition metal dopants on the local structure of the prototypical 0.75 Pb(Mg$_{1/3}$Nb$_{2/3}$)O$_3$-0.25 PbTiO$_3$ relaxor ferroelectric. We find that these dopants give rise to very different local structure and other physical properties. For example, when Mg is partially substituted by Cu or Zn, the displacement of Cu or Zn is much larger than that of Mg, and is even comparable to that of Nb. The polarization of these systems is also increased, especially for the Cu-doped solution, due to the large polarizability of Cu and Zn. As a result, the predicted maximum dielectric constant temperatures ($T_m$) are increased. On the other hand, the replacement of a Ti atom with a Mo or Tc dramatically decreases the displacements of the cations and the polarization, and thus, the $T_m$ values are also substantially decreased. The higher $T_m$ cannot be explained by the conventional argument based on the ionic radii of the cations. Furthermore, we find that Cu, Mo, or Tc doping increase the cations displacement disorder. The effect of the dopants on the temperature dispersion ${\Delta}T_m$, which is the change of $T_m$ for different frequencies, is also discussed. Our findings lay the foundation for further investigations of unexplored dopants.
  • The quantum anomalous Hall effect, an exotic topological state first theoretically predicted by Haldane and recently experimentally observed, has attracted enormous interest for low-power-consumption electronics. In this work, we derived a Schr{\"o}dinger-like equation of phonons, where topology-related quantities, time reversal symmetry and its breaking can be naturally introduced similar as for electrons. Furthermore, we proposed a phononic analog of the Haldane model, which gives the novel quantum (anomalous) Hall-like phonon states characterized by one-way gapless edge modes immune to scattering. The topologically nontrivial phonon states are useful not only for conducting phonons without dissipation but also for designing highly efficient phononic devices, like an ideal phonon diode, which could find important applications in future phononics.
  • Phonons as collective excitations of lattice vibrations are the main heat carriers in solids. Tremendous effort has been devoted to investigate phonons and related properties, giving rise to an intriguing field of phononics, which is of great importance to many practical applications, including heat dissipation, thermal barrier coating, thermoelectrics and thermal control devices. Meanwhile, the research of topology-related physics, awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, has led to discoveries of various exotic quantum states of matter, including the quantum (anomalous/spin) Hall [Q(A/S)H] effects, topological insulators/semimetals and topological superconductors. An emerging research field is to bring topological concepts for a new paradigm phononics---"topological phononics". In this Perspective, we will briefly introduce this emerging field and discuss the use of novel quantum degrees of freedom like the Berry phase and topology for manipulating phonons in unprecedentedly new ways.
  • Materials with large magnetocrystalline anisotropy and strong electric field effects are highly needed to develop new types of memory devices based on electric field control of spin orientations. Instead of using modified transition metal films, we propose that certain monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are the ideal candidate materials for this purpose. Using density functional calculations, we show that they exhibit not only a large magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA), but also colossal voltage modulation under external field. Notably, in some materials like CrSe_2 and FeSe_2, where spins show a strong preference for in-plane orientation, they can be switched to out-of-plane direction. This effect is attributed to the large band character alteration that the transition metal d-states undergo around the Fermi energy due to the electric field. We further demonstrate that strain can also greatly change MCA, and can help to improve the modulation efficiency while combined with an electric field.
  • Atomically thin PtSe2 films have attracted extensive research interests for potential applications in high-speed electronics, spintronics and photodetectors. Obtaining high quality, single crystalline thin films with large size is critical. Here we report the first successful layer-by-layer growth of high quality PtSe2 films by molecular beam epitaxy. Atomically thin films from 1 ML to 22 ML have been grown and characterized by low-energy electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Moreover, a systematic thickness dependent study of the electronic structure is revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and helical spin texture is revealed by spin-ARPES. Our work provides new opportunities for growing large size single crystalline films for investigating the physical properties and potential applications of PtSe2.
  • Topological semimetals have attracted extensive research interests for realizing condensed matter physics counterparts of three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl fermions, which were originally introduced in high energy physics. Recently it has been proposed that type-II Dirac semimetal can host a new type of Dirac fermions which break Lorentz invariance and therefore does not have counterpart in high energy physics. Here we report the electronic structure of high quality PtSe$_2$ crystals to provide direct evidence for the existence of three-dimensional type-II Dirac fermions. A comparison of the crystal, vibrational and electronic structure to a sister compound PtTe$_2$ is also discussed. Our work provides an important platform for exploring the novel quantum phenomena in the PtSe$_2$ class of type-II Dirac semimetals.
  • Migration of oxygen vacancies has been proposed to play an important role in the bipolar memristive behaviors since oxygen vacancies can directly determine the local conductivity in many systems. However, a recent theoretical work demonstrated that both migration of oxygen vacancies and coexistence of cation and anion vacancies are crucial to the occurrence of bipolar memristive switching, normally observed in the small-sized NiO. So far, experimental work addressing this issue is still lacking. In this work, with conductive atomic force microscope and combined scanning transmission electron microscopy & electron energy loss spectroscopy, we reveal that concentration surplus of Ni vacancy over O vacancy determines the bipolar memristive switching of NiO films. Our work supports the dual-defects-based model, which is of fundamental importance for understanding the memristor mechanisms beyond the well-established oxygen-vacancy-based model. Moreover, this work provides a methodology to investigate the effect of dual defects on memristive behaviors.
  • Recently, a new "type-II" Weyl fermion, which exhibits exotic phenomena such as angle-dependent chiral anomaly, was discovered in a new phase of matter where electron and hole pockets contact at isolated Weyl points. [Nature \textbf{527}, 495 (2015)] This raises an interesting question whether its counterpart, i.e., type-II \textit{Dirac} fermion, exists in real materials. Here, we predict the existence of symmetry-protected type-II Dirac fermions in a class of transition metal dichalcogenide materials. Our first-principles calculations on PtSe$_2$ reveal its bulk type-II Dirac fermions which are characterized by strongly tilted Dirac cones, novel surface states, and exotic doping-driven Lifshitz transition. Our results show that the existence of type-II Dirac fermions in PtSe$_2$-type materials is closely related to its structural $P\bar{3}m1$ symmetry, which provides useful guidance for the experimental realization of type-II Dirac fermions and intriguing physical properties distinct from those of the standard Dirac fermions known before.
  • Weyl semimetal is a new quantum state of matter [1-12] hosting the condensed matter physics counterpart of relativisticWeyl fermion [13] originally introduced in high energy physics. The Weyl semimetal realized in the TaAs class features multiple Fermi arcs arising from topological surface states [10, 11, 14-16] and exhibits novel quantum phenomena, e.g., chiral anomaly induced negative mag-netoresistance [17-19] and possibly emergent supersymmetry [20]. Recently it was proposed theoretically that a new type (type-II) of Weyl fermion [21], which does not have counterpart in high energy physics due to the breaking of Lorentz invariance, can emerge as topologically-protected touching between electron and hole pockets. Here, we report direct spectroscopic evidence of topological Fermi arcs in the predicted type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2 [22-24]. The topological surface states are confirmed by directly observing the surface states using bulk-and surface-sensitive angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and the quasi-particle interference (QPI) pattern between the two putative Fermi arcs in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Our work establishes MoTe2 as the first experimental realization of type-II Weyl semimetal, and opens up new opportunities for probing novel phenomena such as exotic magneto-transport [21] in type-II Weyl semimetals.
  • The rise of topological insulators in recent years has broken new ground both in the conceptual cognition of condensed matter physics and the promising revolution of the electronic devices. It also stimulates the explorations of more topological states of matter. Topological crystalline insulator is a new topological phase, which combines the electronic topology and crystal symmetry together. In this article, we review the recent progress in the studies of SnTe-class topological crystalline insulator materials. Starting from the topological identifications in the aspects of the bulk topology, surface states calculations and experimental observations, we present the electronic properties of topological crystalline insulators under various perturbations, including native defect, chemical doping, strain, and thickness-dependent confinement effects, and then discuss their unique quantum transport properties, such as valley-selective filtering and helicity-resolved functionalities for Dirac fermions. The rich properties and high tunability make SnTe-class materials promising candidates for novel quantum devices.
  • Topological semimetals have recently attracted extensive research interests as host materials to condensed matter physics counterparts of Dirac and Weyl fermions originally proposed in high energy physics. These fermions with linear dispersions near the Dirac or Weyl points obey Lorentz invariance, and the chiral anomaly leads to novel quantum phenomena such as negative magnetoresistance. The Lorentz invariance is, however, not necessarily respected in condensed matter physics, and thus Lorentz-violating type-II Dirac fermions with strongly tilted cones can be realized in topological semimetals. Here, we report the first experimental evidence of type-II Dirac fermions in bulk stoichiometric PtTe$_2$ single crystal. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements and first-principles calculations reveal a pair of strongly tilted Dirac cones along the $\Gamma$-A direction under the symmetry protection, confirming PtTe$_2$ as a type-II Dirac semimetal. The realization of type-II Dirac fermions opens a new door for exotic physical properties distinguished from type-I Dirac fermions in condensed matter materials.
  • Based on first-principles calculations and an effective Hamiltonian analysis, we systematically investigate the electronic and topological properties of alkaline-earth compounds $AX_2$ ($A$=Ca, Sr, Ba; $X$=Si, Ge, Sn). Taking BaSn$_2$ as an example, we find that when spin-orbit coupling is ignored, these materials are three-dimensional topological nodal-line semimetals characterized by a snake-like nodal loop in three-dimensional momentum space. Drumhead-like surface states emerge either inside or outside the loop circle on the (001) surface depending on surface termination, while complicated double-drumhead-like surface states appear on the (010) surface. When spin-orbit coupling is included, the nodal line is gapped and the system becomes a topological insulator with Z$_2$ topological invariants (1;001). Since spin-orbit coupling effects are weak in light elements, the nodal-line semimetal phase is expected to be achievable in some alkaline-earth germanides and silicides.
  • Based on first-principles calculations, we find that LiZnBi, a metallic hexagonal $ABC$ compound, can be driven into a Dirac semimetal with a pair of Dirac points by strain. The nontrivial topological nature of the strained LiZnBi is directly demonstrated by calculating its $\mathbb{Z}_2$ index and the surface states, where the Fermi arcs are clearly observed. The low-energy states as well as topological properties are shown to be sensitive to the strain configurations. The finding of Dirac semimetal phase in LiZnBi may intrigue further researches on the topological properties of hexagonal $ABC$ materials and promote new practical applications.
  • The generally accepted view that spin polarization is induced by the asymmetry of the global crystal space group has limited the search for spintronics [1] materials to non-centrosymmetric materials. Recently it has been suggested that spin polarization originates fundamentally from local atomic site asymmetries [2], and therefore centrosymmetric materials may exhibit previously overlooked spin polarizations. Here by using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES), we report helical spin texture induced by local Rashba effect (R-2) in centrosymmetric monolayer PtSe$_2$ film. First-principles calculations and effective analytical model support the spin-layer locking picture: in contrast to the spin splitting in conventional Rashba effect (R-1), the opposite spin polarizations induced by R-2 are degenerate in energy while spatially separated in the top and bottom Se layers. These results not only enrich our understanding of spin polarization physics, but also may find applications in electrically tunable spintronics.
  • The low energy physics of both graphene and surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators is described by gapless Dirac fermions with linear dispersion. In this work, we predict the emergence of a "heavy" Dirac fermion in a graphene/topological insulator hetero-junction, where the linear term almost vanishes and the corresponding energy dispersion becomes highly non-linear. By combining {\it ab initio} calculations and an effective low-energy model, we show explicitly how strong hybridization between Dirac fermions in graphene and the surface states of topological insulators can reduce the Fermi velocity of Dirac fermions. Due to the negligible linear term, interaction effects will be greatly enhanced and can drive "heavy" Dirac fermion states into the half quantum Hall state with non-zero Hall conductance.
  • Three dimensional topological Dirac semi-metals represent a novel state of quantum matter with exotic electronic properties, in which a pair of Dirac points with the linear dispersion along all momentum directions exist in the bulk. Herein, by using the first principles calculations, we discover a new metastable allotrope of Ge and Sn in the staggered layered dumbbell structure, named as germancite and stancite, to be Dirac semi-metals with a pair of Dirac points on its rotation axis. On the surface parallel to the rotation axis, a pair of topologically non-trivial Fermi arcs are observed and a Lifshitz transition is found by tuning the Fermi level. Furthermore, the quantum thin film of germancite is found to be an intrinsic quantum spin Hall insulator. These discoveries suggest novel physical properties and future applications of the new metastable allotrope of Ge and Sn.
  • Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are one-dimensional (1D) structures that exhibit a rich variety of electronic properties1-17. Therefore, they are predicted to be the building blocks in next-generation nanoelectronic devices. Theoretically, it has been demonstrated that armchair GNRs can be divided into three families, i.e., Na = 3p, Na = 3p + 1, and Na = 3p + 2 (here Na is the number of dimer lines across the ribbon width and p is an integer), according to their electronic structures, and the energy gaps for the three families are quite different even with the same p1,3-6. However, a systematic experimental verification of this fundamental prediction is still lacking, owing to very limited atomic-level control of the width of the armchair GNRs investigated7,9,10,13,17. Here, we studied electronic structures of the armchair GNRs with atomically well-defined widths ranging from Na = 6 to Na = 26 by using scanning tunnelling microscope (STM). Our result demonstrated explicitly that all the studied armchair GNRs exhibit semiconducting gaps due to quantum confinement and, more importantly, the observed gaps as a function of Na are well grouped into the three categories, as predicted by density-functional theory calculations3. Such a result indicated that we can tune the electronic properties of the armchair GNRs dramatically by simply adding or cutting one carbon dimer line along the ribbon width.
  • The light-like dispersion of graphene monolayer results in many novel electronic properties in it1, however, this gapless feature also limits the applications of graphene monolayer in digital electronics2. A rare working solution to generate a moderate bandgap in graphene monolayer is to cut it into one-dimensional (1D) nanometre-wide ribbons3-13. Here we show that a wide bandgap can be created in a unique 1D strained structure, i.e., graphene-nanoribbon-like (GNR-like) structure, of a continuous graphene sheet via strong interaction between graphene and the metal substrate, instead of cutting graphene monolayer. The GNR-like structures with width of only a few nanometers are observed in a continuous graphene sheet grown on Rh foil by using thermal strain engineering. Spatially-resolved scanning tunnelling spectroscopy revealed bandgap opening of a few hundreds meV in the GNR-like structure in an otherwise continuous metallic graphene sheet, directly demonstrating the realization of a metallic-semiconducting-metallic junction entirely in a graphene monolayer. We also show that it is possible to tailor the structure and electronic properties of the GNR-like structure by using scanning tunnelling microscope.