• LaSalle invariance principle was originally proposed in the 1950's and has become a fundamental mathematical tool in the area of dynamical systems and control. In both theoretical research and engineering practice, discrete-time dynamical systems have been at least as extensively studied as continuous-time systems. For example, model predictive control is typically studied in discrete-time via Lyapunov methods. However, there is a peculiar absence in the standard literature of standard treatments of Lyapunov functions and LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time nonlinear systems. Most of the textbooks on nonlinear dynamical systems focus only on continuous-time systems. In Chapter 1 of the book by LaSalle [11], the author establishes the LaSalle invariance principle for difference equation systems. However, all the useful lemmas in [11] are given in the form of exercises with no proof provided. In this document, we provide the proofs of all the lemmas proposed in [11] that are needed to derive the main theorem on the LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time dynamical systems. We organize all the materials in a self-contained manner. We first introduce some basic concepts and definitions in Section 1, such as dynamical systems, invariant sets, and limit sets. In Section 2 we present and prove some useful lemmas on the properties of invariant sets and limit sets. Finally, we establish the original LaSalle invariance principle for discrete-time dynamical systems and a simple extension in Section~3. In Section 4, we provide some references on extensions of LaSalle invariance principles for further reading. This document is intended for educational and tutorial purposes and contains lemmas that might be useful as a reference for researchers.
  • This paper studies linear stochastic approximation (SA) algorithms and their application to multi-agent systems in engineering and sociology. As main contribution, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for convergence of linear SA algorithms to a deterministic or random final vector. We also characterize the system convergence rate, when the system is convergent. Moreover, differing from non-negative gain functions in traditional SA algorithms, this paper considers also the case when the gain functions are allowed to take arbitrary real numbers. Using our general treatment, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions to reach consensus and group consensus for first-order discrete-time multi-agent system over random signed networks and with state-dependent noise. Finally, we extend our results to the setting of multi-dimensional linear SA algorithms and characterize the behavior of the multi-dimensional Friedkin-Johnsen model over random interaction networks.
  • In this work we review a class of deterministic nonlinear models for the propagation of infectious diseases over contact networks with strongly-connected topologies. We consider network models for susceptible-infected (SI), susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS), and susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) settings. In each setting, we provide a comprehensive nonlinear analysis of equilibria, stability properties, convergence, monotonicity, positivity, and threshold conditions. For the network SI setting, specific contributions include establishing its equilibria, stability, and positivity properties. For the network SIS setting, we review a well-known deterministic model, provide novel results on the computation and characterization of the endemic state (when the system is above the epidemic threshold), and present alternative proofs for some of its properties. Finally, for the network SIR setting, we propose novel results for transient behavior, threshold conditions, stability properties, and asymptotic convergence. These results are analogous to those well-known for the scalar case. In addition, we provide a novel iterative algorithm to compute the asymptotic state of the network SIR system.
  • This paper proposes models of learning process in teams of individuals who collectively execute a sequence of tasks and whose actions are determined by individual skill levels and networks of interpersonal appraisals and influence. The closely-related proposed models have increasing complexity, starting with a centralized manager-based assignment and learning model, and finishing with a social model of interpersonal appraisal, assignments, learning, and influences. We show how rational optimal behavior arises along the task sequence for each model, and discuss conditions of suboptimality. Our models are grounded in replicator dynamics from evolutionary games, influence networks from mathematical sociology, and transactive memory systems from organization science.
  • In this paper we propose a class of propagation models for multiple competing products over a social network. We consider two propagation mechanisms: social conversion and self conversion, corresponding, respectively, to endogenous and exogenous factors. A novel concept, the product-conversion graph, is proposed to characterize the interplay among competing products. According to the chronological order of social and self conversions, we develop two Markov-chain models and, based on the independence approximation, we approximate them with two respective difference equations systems. Theoretical analysis on these two approximation models reveals the dependency of the systems' asymptotic behavior on the structures of both the product-conversion graph and the social network, as well as the initial condition. In addition to the theoretical work, accuracy of the independence approximation and the asymptotic behavior of the Markov-chain model are investigated via numerical analysis, for the case where social conversion occurs before self conversion. Finally, we propose a class of multi-player and multi-stage competitive propagation games and discuss the seeding-quality trade-off, as well as the allocation of seeding resources among the individuals. We investigate the unique Nash equilibrium at each stage and analyze the system's behavior when every player is adopting the policy at the Nash equilibrium.