• We investigate the relationship between the quenching of star formation and the structural transformation of massive galaxies, using a large sample of photometrically-selected post-starburst galaxies in the UKIDSS UDS field. We find that post-starburst galaxies at high-redshift ($z>1$) show high S\'ersic indices, significantly higher than those of active star-forming galaxies, but with a distribution that is indistinguishable from the old quiescent population. We conclude that the morphological transformation occurs before (or during) the quenching of star formation. Recently quenched galaxies are also the most compact; we find evidence that massive post-starburst galaxies (M$_{\ast}> 10^{10.5} ~$M$_{\odot}$) at high redshift ($z>1$) are on average smaller than comparable quiescent galaxies at the same epoch. Our findings are consistent with a scenario in which massive passive galaxies are formed from three distinct phases: (1) gas-rich dissipative collapse to very high densities, forming the proto-spheroid; (2) rapid quenching of star formation, to create the "red nugget" with post-starburst features; (3) a gradual growth in size as the population ages, perhaps as a result of minor mergers.
  • We investigate the prevalence of AGN in the high-redshift protocluster $\rm{Cl}\,0218.3$-$0510$ at $z=1.62$. Using imaging from the Chandra X-ray Telescope, we find a large overdensity of AGN in the protocluster; a factor of $23\pm9$ times the field density of AGN. Only half of this AGN overdensity is due to the overdensity of massive galaxies in the protocluster (a factor of $11\pm2$), as we find that $17^{+6}_{-5}\%$ of massive galaxies ($M_* > 10^{10}\,\rm{M}_{\odot}$) in the protocluster host an X-ray luminous AGN, compared to $8\pm1\%$ in the field. This corresponds to an enhancement of AGN activity in massive protocluster galaxies by a factor of $2.1\pm0.7$ at $1.6\sigma$ significance. We also find that the AGN overdensity is centrally concentrated, located within 3 arcmin and most pronounced within 1 arcmin of the centre of the protocluster. Our results confirm that there is a reversal in the local anti-correlation between galaxy density and AGN activity, so there is an enhancement of AGN in high-redshift protoclusters. We compare the properties of AGN in the protocluster to the field and find no significant differences in the distributions of their stellar mass, X-ray luminosity, or hardness ratio. We therefore suggest that triggering mechanisms are similar in both environments, and that the mechanisms simply occur more frequently in denser environments.
  • We use a large sample of $\sim 350,000$ galaxies constructed by combining the UKIDSS UDS, VIDEO/CFHT-LS, UltraVISTA/COSMOS and GAMA survey regions to probe the major merging histories of massive galaxies ($>10^{10}\ \mathrm{M}_\odot$) at $0.005 < z < 3.5$. We use a method adapted from that presented in Lopez-Sanjuan et al. (2014) using the full photometric redshift probability distributions, to measure pair $\textit{fractions}$ of flux-limited, stellar mass selected galaxy samples using close-pair statistics. The pair fraction is found to weakly evolve as $\propto (1+z)^{0.8}$ with no dependence on stellar mass. We subsequently derive major merger $\textit{rates}$ for galaxies at $> 10^{10}\ \mathrm{M}_\odot$ and at a constant number density of $n > 10^{-4}$ Mpc$^{-3}$, and find rates a factor of 2-3 smaller than previous works, although this depends strongly on the assumed merger timescale and likelihood of a close-pair merging. Galaxies undergo approximately 0.5 major mergers at $z < 3.5$, accruing an additional 1-4 $\times 10^{10}\ \mathrm{M}_\odot$ in the process. Major merger accretion rate densities of $\sim 2 \times 10^{-4}$ $\mathrm{M}_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ are found for number density selected samples, indicating that direct progenitors of local massive ($>10^{11}\mathrm{M}_\odot$) galaxies have experienced a steady supply of stellar mass via major mergers throughout their evolution. While pair fractions are found to agree with those predicted by the Henriques et al. (2014) semi-analytic model, the Illustris hydrodynamical simulation fails to quantitatively reproduce derived merger rates. Furthermore, we find major mergers become a comparable source of stellar mass growth compared to star-formation at $z < 1$, but is 10-100 times smaller than the SFR density at higher redshifts.
  • We present a new method for tracing the evolution of BCGs from $z\sim 2$ to $z\sim 0$. We conclude on the basis of semi-analytical models that the best method to select BCG progenitors at $z\sim 2$ is a hybrid environmental density and stellar mass ranking approach. Ultimately we are able to retrieve 45\% of BCG progenitors. We apply this method on the CANDELS UDS data to construct a progenitor sample at high redshift. We furthermore populate the comparisons in local universe by using SDSS data with statistically likely contamination to ensure a fair comparison between high and low redshifts. Using these samples we demonstrate that the BCG sizes have grown by a factor of $\sim 3.2$ since $z\sim 2$, and BCG progenitors are mainly late-type galaxies, exhibiting less concentrated profiles than their early-type local counterparts. We find that BCG progenitors have more disturbed morphologies. In contrast, local BCGs have much smoother profiles. Moreover, we find that the stellar masses of BCGs have grown by a factor of $\sim 2.5$ since $z\sim 2$, and the SFR of BCG progenitors has a median value of 13.5 $M_\odot$yr$^{-1}$, much higher than their quiescent local descendants. We demonstrate that over $z=1-2$ star formation and merging contribute equally to BCG mass growth. However, merging plays a dominant role in BCG assembly at $z \lesssim 1$. We also find that BCG progenitors at high-$z$ are not significantly different from other galaxies of similar mass at the same epoch. This suggests that the processes which differentiate BCGs from normal massive elliptical galaxies must occur at $z \lesssim 2$.
  • Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are among the most luminous dusty galaxies in the Universe, but their true nature remains unclear; are SMGs the progenitors of the massive elliptical galaxies we see in the local Universe, or are they just a short-lived phase among more typical star-forming galaxies? To explore this problem further, we investigate the clustering of SMGs identified in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We use a catalogue of submillimetre ($850\mu$m) source identifications derived using a combination of radio counterparts and colour/IR selection to analyse a sample of 914 SMGs in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), making this the largest high redshift sample of these galaxies to date. Using angular cross-correlation techniques, we estimate the halo masses for this large sample of SMGs and compare them with passive and star-forming galaxies selected in the same field. We find that SMGs, on average, occupy high-mass dark matter halos (M$_{\text{halo}} >10^{13}$M$_{\odot}$) at redshifts $z > 2.5$, consistent with being the progenitors of massive quiescent galaxies in present-day galaxy clusters. We also find evidence of downsizing, in which SMG activity shifts to lower mass halos at lower redshifts. In terms of their clustering and halo masses, SMGs appear to be consistent with other star-forming galaxies at a given redshift.
  • Due to significant galaxy contamination and impurity in stellar mass selected samples (up to 95% from z=0-3), we examine the star formation history, quenching time-scales, and structural evolution of galaxies using a constant number density selection with data from the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey field. Using this methodology we investigate the evolution of galaxies at a variety of number densities from $z=0-3$. We find that samples chosen at number densities ranging from $3\times10^{-4}$ to 10$^{-5}$ galaxies Mpc$^{-3}$ (corresponding to $z\sim0.5$ stellar masses of M$_{*}= 10^{10.95-11.6}$ M$_{0}$) have a star forming blue fraction of $\sim50$\% at $z\sim2.5$, which evolves to a nearly $100$\% quenched red and dead population by $z\sim 1$. We also see evidence for number density downsizing, such that the galaxies selected at the lowest densities (highest masses) become a homogeneous red population before those at higher number densities. Examining the evolution of the colours for these systems furthermore shows that the formation redshift of galaxies selected at these number densities is $z_{\rm form}>3$. The structural evolution through size and Sersic index fits reveal that while there remains evolution in terms of galaxies becoming larger and more concentrated in stellar mass at lower redshifts, the magnitude of the change is significantly smaller than for a mass selected sample. We also find that changes in size and structure continues at $z < 1$, and is coupled strongly to passivity evolution. We conclude that galaxy structure is driving the quenching of galaxies, such that galaxies become concentrated before they become passive.
  • We measure the evolution of the quiescent fraction and quenching efficiency of satellites around star-forming and quiescent central galaxies with stellar mass $\log(M_{\mathrm{cen}}/M_{\odot})>10.5$ at $0.3<z<2.5$. We combine imaging from three deep near-infrared-selected surveys (ZFOURGE/CANDELS, UDS, and UltraVISTA), which allows us to select a stellar-mass complete sample of satellites with $\log(M_{\mathrm{sat}}/M_{\odot})>9.3$. Satellites for both star-forming and quiescent central galaxies have higher quiescent fractions compared to field galaxies matched in stellar mass at all redshifts. We also observe "galactic conformity": satellites around quiescent centrals are more likely to be quenched compared to the satellites around star-forming centrals. In our sample, this conformity signal is significant at $\gtrsim3\sigma$ for $0.6<z<1.6$, whereas it is only weakly significant at $0.3<z<0.6$ and $1.6<z<2.5$. Therefore, conformity (and therefore satellite quenching) has been present for a significant fraction of the age of the universe. The satellite quenching efficiency increases with increasing stellar mass of the central, but does not appear to depend on the stellar mass of the satellite to the mass limit of our sample. When we compare the satellite quenching efficiency of star-forming centrals with stellar masses 0.2 dex higher than quiescent centrals (which should account for any difference in halo mass), the conformity signal decreases, but remains statistically significant at $0.6<z<0.9$. This is evidence that satellite quenching is connected to the star-formation properties of the central as well as to the mass of the halo. We discuss physical effects that may contribute to galactic conformity, and emphasize that they must allow for continued star-formation in the central galaxy even as the satellites are quenched.
  • We extend the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) framework to generate mock galaxy catalogs exhibiting varying levels of "galactic conformity", which has emerged as a potentially powerful probe of environmental effects in galaxy evolution. Our model correlates galaxy colours in a group with the concentration of the common parent dark halo through a "group quenching efficiency" $\rho$ which makes older, more concentrated halos $\textit{at fixed mass}$ preferentially host redder galaxies. We find that, for a specific value of $\rho$, this 1-halo conformity matches corresponding measurements in a group catalog based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our mocks also display conformity at large separations from isolated objects, potentially an imprint of halo assembly bias. A detailed study - using mocks with assembly bias erased while keeping 1-halo conformity intact - reveals a rather nuanced situation, however. At separations $\lesssim 4$Mpc, conformity is mainly a 1-halo effect dominated by the largest halos and is $\textit{not}$ a robust indicator of assembly bias. Only at very large separations ($\gtrsim 8$Mpc) does genuine 2-halo conformity, driven by the assembly bias of small halos, manifest distinctly. We explain all these trends in standard Halo Model terms. Our model opens the door to parametrized HOD analyses that self-consistently account for galactic conformity at all scales.
  • We combine photometry from the UDS, and CANDELS UDS and CANDELS GOODS-S surveys to construct the galaxy stellar mass function probing both the low and high mass end accurately in the redshift range 0.3<z<3. The advantages of using a homogeneous concatenation of these datasets include meaningful measures of environment in the UDS, due to its large area (0.88 deg^2), and the high resolution deep imaging in CANDELS (H_160 > 26.0), affording us robust measures of structural parameters. We construct stellar mass functions for the entire sample as parameterised by the Schechter function, and find that there is a decline in the values of phi and of alpha with higher redshifts, and a nearly constant M* up to z~3. We divide the galaxy stellar mass function by colour, structure, and environment and explore the links between environmental over-density, morphology, and the quenching of star formation. We find that a double Schechter function describes galaxies with high Sersic index (n>2.5), similar to galaxies which are red or passive. The low-mass end of the n>2.5 stellar mass function is dominated by blue galaxies, whereas the high-mass end is dominated by red galaxies. This hints that possible links between morphological evolution and star formation quenching are only present in high-mass galaxies. This is turn suggests that there are strong mass dependent quenching mechanisms. In addition, we find that the number density of high mass systems is elevated in dense environments, suggesting that an environmental process is building up massive galaxies quicker in over densities than in lower densities.
  • We present a study on the stellar mass growth of the progenitors of local massive galaxies with a variety of number density selections with $n\le1\times10^{-4}\,\rm{Mpc^{-3}}$ (corresponding to $M_*=10^{11.24}\rm{M_{\odot}}$ at z=0.3) in the redshift range $0.3<z<3.0$. We select the progenitors of massive galaxies using a constant number density selection, and one which is adjusted to account for major mergers. We find that the progenitors of massive galaxies grow by a factor of four in total stellar mass over this redshift range. On average the stellar mass added via the processes of star formation, major and minor mergers account for $24\pm8\%$, $17\pm15\%$ and $34\pm14\%$, respectively, of the total galaxy stellar mass at $z=0.3$. Therefore $51\pm20\%$ of the total stellar mass in massive galaxies at $z=0.3$ is created externally to their z=3 progenitors. We explore the implication of these results on the cold gas accretion rate and size evolution of the progenitors of most massive galaxies over the same redshift range. We find an average gas accretion rate of $\sim66\pm32\,\rm{M_{\odot}yr^{-1}}$ over the redshift range of $1.5<z<3.0$. We find that the size evolution of a galaxy sample selected this way is on average lower than the findings of other investigations.
  • We measure new estimates for the galaxy stellar mass function and star formation rates for samples of galaxies at $z \sim 4,~5,~6~\&~7$ using data in the CANDELS GOODS South field. The deep near-infrared observations allow us to construct the stellar mass function at $z \geq 6$ directly for the first time. We estimate stellar masses for our sample by fitting the observed spectral energy distributions with synthetic stellar populations, including nebular line and continuum emission. The observed UV luminosity functions for the samples are consistent with previous observations, however we find that the observed $M_{UV}$ - M$_{*}$ relation has a shallow slope more consistent with a constant mass to light ratio and a normalisation which evolves with redshift. Our stellar mass functions have steep low-mass slopes ($\alpha \approx -1.9$), steeper than previously observed at these redshifts and closer to that of the UV luminosity function. Integrating our new mass functions, we find the observed stellar mass density evolves from $\log_{10} \rho_{*} = 6.64^{+0.58}_{-0.89}$ at $z \sim 7$ to $7.36\pm0.06$ $\text{M}_{\odot} \text{Mpc}^{-3}$ at $z \sim 4$. Finally, combining the measured UV continuum slopes ($\beta$) with their rest-frame UV luminosities, we calculate dust corrected star-formation rates (SFR) for our sample. We find the specific star-formation rate for a fixed stellar mass increases with redshift whilst the global SFR density falls rapidly over this period. Our new SFR density estimates are higher than previously observed at this redshift.
  • We explore the redshift evolution of a curious correlation between the star-formation properties of central galaxies and their satellites (`galactic conformity') at intermediate to high redshift ($0.4<z<1.9$). Using an extremely deep near-infrared survey, we study the distribution and properties of satellite galaxies with stellar masses, ${\rm log} ({\rm M}_*/{\rm M}_{\odot})>9.7$, around central galaxies at the characteristic Schechter function mass, ${\rm M} \sim {\rm M}^{\ast}$. We fit the radial profiles of satellite number densities with simple power laws, finding slopes in the range -1.1 to -1.4 for mass-selected satellites, and -1.3 to -1.6 for passive satellites. We confirm the tendency for passive satellites to be preferentially located around passive central galaxies at $3\sigma$ significance and show that it exists to at least $z\sim2$. Meanwhile, the quenched fraction of satellites around star-forming galaxies is consistent with field galaxies of equal stellar masses. We find no convincing evidence for a redshift-dependent evolution of these trends. One simple interpretation of these results is that only passive central galaxies occupy an environment that is capable of independently shutting off star-formation in satellite galaxies. By examining the satellites of higher stellar mass star-forming galaxies (${\rm log} ({\rm M}_*/{\rm M}_{\odot}) > 11$), we conclude that the origin of galactic conformity is unlikely to be exclusively due to the host dark-matter halo mass. A halo-mass-independent correlation could be established by either formation bias or a more physical connection between central and satellite star-formation histories. For the latter, we argue that a star-formation (or AGN) related outburst event from the central galaxy could establish a hot halo environment which is then capable of quenching both central and satellite galaxies.
  • We present evidence for a strong relationship between galaxy size and environment for the quiescent population in the redshift range 1 < z < 2. Environments were measured using projected galaxy overdensities on a scale of 400 kpc, as determined from ~ 96,000 K-band selected galaxies from the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS). Sizes were determined from ground-based K-band imaging, calibrated using space-based CANDELS HST observations in the centre of the UDS field, with photometric redshifts and stellar masses derived from 11-band photometric fitting. From the resulting size-mass relation, we confirm that quiescent galaxies at a given stellar mass were typically ~ 50 % smaller at z ~ 1.4 compared to the present day. At a given epoch, however, we find that passive galaxies in denser environments are on average significantly larger at a given stellar mass. The most massive quiescent galaxies (M_stellar > 2 x 10^11 M_sun) at z > 1 are typically 50 % larger in the highest density environments compared to those in the lowest density environments. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we reject the null hypothesis that the size-mass relation is independent of environment at a significance > 4.8 sigma for the redshift range 1 < z < 2. In contrast, the evidence for a relationship between size and environment is much weaker for star-forming galaxies.
  • In this paper we present a detailed study of the structures and morphologies of a sample of 1188 massive galaxies with Mstar>10^10Msun between redshifts z=1-3 within the Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) region of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) field. Using this sample we determine how galaxy structure and morphology evolve with time. We visually classify our sample into disks, ellipticals and peculiar systems and correct for redshift effects on our classifications through simulations. We find evolution in the fractions of galaxies at a given visual classification as a function of redshift. The peculiar population is dominant at z>2 with a substantial spheroid population, and a negligible disk population. We compute the transition redshift, ztrans, where the combined fraction of spheroids and disks is equal to that of peculiar galaxies, as ztrans=1.86+/-0.62 for galaxies in our stellar mass range. We find that this changes as a function of stellar mass, with Hubble-type systems becoming dominant at higher redshifts for higher mass galaxies (ztrans=2.22+/-0.82), than for the lower mass galaxies (ztrans=1.73+/-0.57). Higher mass galaxies become morphologically settled before their lower mass counterparts, a form of morphological downsizing. We furthermore compare our visual classifications with Sersic index, the concentration, asymmetry and clumpiness (CAS) parameters, star formation rate and rest frame U-B colour. We find links between the colour of a galaxy, its star formation rate and how extended or peculiar it appears. Finally, we discuss the negligible z>2 disk fraction based on visual morphologies and speculate that this is an effect of forming disks appearing peculiar through processes such as violent disk instabilities or mergers. We conclude that to properly define high redshift morphology a new and more exact classification scheme is needed.
  • We use the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the deepest degree-scale near-infrared survey to date, to investigate the clustering of star-forming and passive galaxies to z ~ 3.5. Our new measurements include the first determination of the clustering for passive galaxies at z > 2, which we achieve using a cross-correlation technique. We find that passive galaxies are the most strongly clustered, typically hosted by massive dark matter halos with M_halo > 5 x 10^12 M_sun irrespective of redshift or stellar mass. Our findings are consistent with models in which a critical halo mass determines the transition from star-forming to passive galaxies. Star-forming galaxies show no strong correlation between stellar mass and halo mass, but passive galaxies show evidence for an anti-correlation; low-mass passive galaxies appear, on average, to be located in the most massive halos. These results can be understood if the termination of star formation is most efficient for galaxies of low stellar mass in very dense environments.
  • We investigate the resolved star formation properties of a sample of 45 massive galaxies (M_*>10^11M_solar) within a redshift range of 1.5 < z < 3 detected in the GOODS NICMOS Survey (Conselice et al. 2011), a HST H-band imaging program. We derive the star formation rate as a function of radius using rest frame UV data from deep z_{850} ACS imaging. The star formation present at high redshift is then extrapolated to z=0, and we examine the stellar mass produced in individual regions within each galaxy. We also construct new stellar mass profiles of the in-situ stellar mass at high redshift from Sersic fits to rest-frame optical, H_{160}-band, data. We combine the two stellar mass profiles to produce a modelled evolved stellar mass profile. We then fit a new Sersic profile to the evolved profile, from which we examine what effect the resulting stellar mass distribution added via star formation has on the structure and size of each individual galaxy. We conclude that due to the lack of sufficient size growth and Sersic evolution by star formation other mechanisms such as merging must contribute a large proportion to account for the observed structural evolution from z>1 to the present day.
  • We present a study of the resolved star-forming properties of a sample of distant massive M_*>10^11M_solar galaxies in the GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS). We derive dust corrected UV star formation rates (SFRs) as a function of radius for 45 massive galaxies within the redshift range 1.5<z<3 in order to measure the spatial location of ongoing star formation. We find that the star formation rates present in different regions of a galaxy reflect the already existent stellar mass density, i.e. high density regions have higher star formation rates than lower density regions, on average. This observed star formation is extrapolated in several ways to the present day, and we measure the amount of new stellar mass that is created in individual portions of each galaxy to determine how the stellar mass added via star formation changes the observed stellar mass profile, the Sersic index (n) and effective radius (R_e) over time. We find that these massive galaxies fall into three broad classifications of star formation distribution. These different star formation distributions increase the effective radii over time, which are on average a factor of ~16pm5% larger, with little change in n (average Delta n=-0.9pm0.9) after evolution. We also implement a range of simple stellar migration models into the simulated evolutionary path of these galaxies in order to gauge its effect on the properties of our sample. This yields a larger increase in the evolved R_e than the pure static star formation model, with a maximum average increase of Delta R_e~54pm19%, but with little change in n, Delta n ~-1.1pm1.3. These results are not in agreement with the observed change in the R_e and n between z~2.5 and 0 obtained via various observational studies. We conclude that star formation and stellar migration alone cannot account for the observed change in structural parameters for this galaxy population (abridged).