• We present VRIJHK photometry of the KH 15D T Tauri binary system for the 2015/16 and 2016/17 observing seasons. For the first time in the modern (CCD) era we are seeing Star B fully emerge from behind the trailing edge of the precessing circumbinary ring during each apastron passage. We are, therefore, able to measure its luminosity and color. Decades of photometry on the system now allow us to infer the effective temperature, radius, mass and age of each binary component. We find our values to be in good agreement with previous studies, including archival photographic photometry from the era when both stars were fully visible, and they set the stage for a full model of the system that can be constructed once radial velocity measurements are available. We also present the first high sensitivity radio observations of the system, taken with ALMA and the SMA. The respective 2.0 and 0.88 mm observations provide an upper limit on the circumbinary (gas and dust) disk mass of 1.7 Jupiter masses and reveal an extended CO outflow which overlaps with the position, systemic velocity and orientation of the KH 15D system and is certainly associated with it. The low velocity, tight collimation, and extended nature of the emission suggest that the outflow is inclined nearly orthogonal to the line of sight, implying it is also orthogonal to the circumbinary ring. The position angle of the radio outflow also agrees precisely with the direction of polarization of the optical emission during the faint phase. A small offset between the optical image of the binary and the central line of the CO outflow remains as a puzzle and possible clue to the jet launching mechanism.
  • We report on Gemini/GNIRS observations of the binary T Tauri system V582 Mon (KH 15D) at three orbital phases. These spectra allow us to untangle five components of the system: the photosphere and magnetosphere of star B, the jet, scattering properties of the ring material, and excess near-IR radiation previously attributed to a possible self-luminous planet. We confirm an early-K subgiant classification for star B and show that the magnetospheric He I emission line is variable, possibly indicating increased mass accretion at certain times. As expected, the H$_2$ emission features associated with the inner part of the jet show no variation with orbital phase. We show that the reflectance spectrum for the scattered light has a distinctive blue slope and spectral features consistent with scattering and absorption by a mixture of water and methane ice grains in the 1-50 $\mu$m size range. This suggests that the methane frost line is closer than $\sim$5 AU in this system, requiring that the grains be shielded from direct radiation. After correcting for features from the scattered light, jet, magnetosphere, and photosphere, we confirm the presence of leftover near-IR light from an additional source, detectable near minimum brightness. A spectral emission feature matching the model spectrum of a 10 M$_{J}$, 1 Myr old planet is found in the excess flux, but other expected features from this model are not seen. Our observations, therefore, tentatively support the picture that a luminous planet is present within the system, although they cannot yet be considered definitive.
  • Infrared variability is common among young stellar objects, with surveys finding daily to weekly fluctuations of a few tenths of a magnitude. Space-based observations can produce highly sampled infrared light curves, but are often limited to total baselines of about a month due to the orientation of the spacecraft. Here we present observations of the Chameleon I cluster whose low declination makes it observable by the Spitzer space telescope over a 200 day period. We observe 30 young stellar objects with a daily cadence to better sample variability on timescales of months. We find such variability is common, occurring in ~80% of the detected cluster members. The change in [3.6]-[4.5] color over 200 days for many of the sources falls between that expected for extinction and fluctuations in disk emission. With our high cadence and long baseline we can derive power spectral density curves covering two orders of magnitude in frequency and find significant power at low frequencies, up to the boundaries of our 200 day survey. Such long timescales are difficult to explain with variations driven by the interaction between the disk and stellar magnetic field, which has a dynamical timescale of days to weeks. The most likely explanation is either structural or temperature fluctuations spread throughout the inner ~0.5 au of the disk, suggesting that the intrinsic dust structure is highly dynamic.
  • We examine the light and color evolution of the T Tauri binary KH 15D through photometry obtained at wavelengths between 0.55 and 8.0 $\mu$m. The data were collected with ANDICAM on the 1.3 m SMARTS telescope at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory and with IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We show that the system's circumbinary ring, which acts as a screen that covers and uncovers different portions of the binary orbit as the ring precesses, has reached an orientation where the brighter component (star B) fully or nearly fully emerges during each orbital cycle. The fainter component (star A) remains fully occulted by the screen at all phases. The leading and trailing edges of the screen move across the sky at the same rate of $\sim$15 meters per second, consistent with expectation for a ring with a radius and width of $\sim$4 AU and a precession period of $\sim$6500 years. Light and color variations continue to indicate that the screen is sharp edged and opaque at \emph{VRIJH} wavelengths. However, we find an increasing transparency of the ring edge at 2.2, 3.6, and 4.5 $\mu$m. Reddening seen at the beginning of the eclipse that occurred during the CSI 2264 campaign particularly suggests selective extinction by a population of large dust grains. Meanwhile, the gradual bluing observed while star B is setting is indicative of forward scattering effects at the edge of the ring. The SED of the system at its bright phase shows no evidence of infrared excess emission that can be attributed to radiation from the ring or other dust component out to 8 microns.
  • We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves, as well as broad-band multi-wavelength photometry and high resolution, multi- and single-epoch spectroscopy for 17 classical T Tauris in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves (LCs) exemplify the "stochastic" LC class as defined in Cody et al. (2014). The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability in this LC class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. As evidence in favor of this hypothesis, multi-epoch high resolution spectra for a subset of these stars shows that their veiling levels also vary in time and that this veiling variability is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical LC morphology. Furthermore, the veiling variability is well-correlated with the strength of the HeI 6678A emission line, a feature predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst LC morphology (Stauffer et al. 2014) are also attributed to variable mass accretion. Both the stochastic and accretion burst LCs can be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic LC class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Based on their UV excesses, veiling, and mean Ha equivalent widths, members of the stochastic LC class have only moderate time-averaged mass accretion rates. The most common feature of their Ha profiles is for them to exhibit blue-shifted absorption features, most likely originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the LCs suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.
  • We present the results of our analysis on V1481 Ori (JW 239), a young SB2 in the Orion Nebula Cluster with a circumbinary disc accreting on the lower-mass component. The analysis is based on high-resolution spectroscopic data and high-quality photometric time series about 20-yr long. Thanks to the spectroscopy, we confirm the binary nature of this system consisting of M3 + M4 components and derive the mass ratio M_B/M_A = 0.54, a variable luminosity ratio L_B/L_A = 0.68--0.94, and an orbital period P_orb = 4.433d. The photometric data allowed us to measure the rotation periods of the two components P_phot = 4.4351d and they are found to be synchronized with the orbital period. The simultaneous modeling of V-, I-band, and radial velocity curves in the 2005 season suggests that the variability is dominated by one hot spot on the secondary component covering at least about 3.5% of the stellar surface and about 420K hotter than the unperturbed photosphere. Such a spot may originate from the material of the circumbinary disc accreting onto the secondary component. We also detect an apparent 6-yr periodic variation in the position of this hot spot, which is inferred from the phase migration of the light curve maximum, which we interpret as due to either the presence of surface differential rotation as large as 0.065%, a value compatible with the fully convective components, or to a periodic exchange of angular momentum between the disc and the star, which implies a minimum magnetic field strength of 650G at the stellar surface.
  • We propose that chondrules are formed by radiative heating of pre-existing dust clumps during close fly-bys of planetesimals with incandescent lava at their surfaces. We show that the required temperatures and cooling rates are easily achieved in this scenario and discuss how it is consistent with bulk aspects of chondritic meteorites, including complementarity and the co-mingling of FeO-poor and FeO-rich chondrules.
  • The classical T Tauri star AA Tau presented photometric variability attributed to an inner disk warp, caused by the interaction between the inner disk and an inclined magnetosphere. Previous studies of NGC 2264 have shown that similar photometric behavior is common among CTTS. The goal of this work is to investigate the main causes of the observed photometric variability of CTTS in NGC 2264 that present AA Tau-like light curves, and verify if an inner disk warp could be responsible for their variability. We investigate veiling variability in their spectra and u-r color variations and estimate parameters of the inner disk warp using an occultation model proposed for AA Tau. We compare infrared and optical light curves to analyze the dust responsible for the occultations. AA Tau-like variability is transient on a timescale of a few years. We ascribe it to stable accretion regimes and aperiodic variability to unstable accretion regimes and show that a transition, and even coexistence, between the two is common. We find evidence of hot spots associated with occultations, indicating that the occulting structures could be located at the base of accretion columns. We find average values of warp maximum height of 0.23 times its radial location, consistent with AA Tau, with variations of on average 11% between rotation cycles. We show that extinction laws in the inner disk indicate the presence of grains larger than interstellar grains. The inner disk warp scenario is consistent with observations for all but one periodic star in our sample. AA Tau-like systems comprise 14% of CTTS observed in NGC 2264, though this increases to 35% among systems of mass 0.7M_sun<M<2.0M_sun. Assuming random inclinations, we estimate that nearly all systems in this mass range likely possess an inner disk warp, possibly because of a change in magnetic field configurations among stars of lower mass.
  • We identify nine young stellar objects (YSOs) in the NGC 2264 star-forming region with optical {\em CoRoT} light curves exhibiting short-duration, shallow, periodic flux dips. All of these stars have infrared (IR) excesses that are consistent with their having inner disk walls near the Keplerian co-rotation radius. The repeating photometric dips have FWHM generally less than one day, depths almost always less than 15%, and periods (3<P<11 days) consistent with dust near the Keplerian co-rotation period. The flux dips vary considerably in their depth from epoch to epoch, but usually persist for several weeks and, in two cases, were present in data collected on successive years. For several of these stars, we also measure the photospheric rotation period and find that the rotation and dip periods are the same, as predicted by standard "disk-locking" models. We attribute these flux dips to clumps of material in or near the inner disk wall, passing through our line of sight to the stellar photosphere. In some cases, these dips are also present in simultaneous {\em Spitzer} IRAC light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. We characterize the properties of these dips, and compare the stars with light curves exhibiting this behavior to other classes of YSO in NGC 2264. A number of physical mechanisms could locally increase the dust scale height near the inner disk wall, and we discuss several of those mechanisms; the most plausible mechanisms are either a disk warp due to interaction with the stellar magnetic field or dust entrained in funnel-flow accretion columns arising near the inner disk wall.
  • Variability in the infrared emission from disks around pre-main sequence stars over the course of days to weeks appears to be common, but the physical cause of the changes in disk structure are not constrained. Here we present coordinated monitoring of one young cluster with the Spitzer and Chandra space telescopes aimed at studying the physical source of the variability. In fall 2011 we obtained ten epochs of Chandra ACIS photometry over a period of 30 days with a roughly 3 day cadence contemporaneous with 20 epochs of Spitzer [3.6],[4.5] photometry over 40 days with a roughly 2 day cadence of the IC 348 cluster. This cadence allows us to search for week to month long responses of the infrared emission to changes in the high-energy flux. We find no strong evidence for a direct link between the X-ray and infrared variability on these timescales among 39 cluster members with circumstellar disks. There is no significant correlation between the shape of the infrared and X-ray light curves, or between the size of the X-ray and infrared variability. Among the stars with an X-ray flare none showed evidence of a correlated change in the infrared photometry on timescales of days to weeks following the flare. This lack of connection implies that X-ray heating of the planet forming region of the disk is not significant, although we cannot rule out rapid or instantaneous changes in infrared emission.
  • We present the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a continuous 30-day multi-wavelength photometric monitoring campaign on more than 1000 young cluster members using 16 telescopes. The unprecedented combination of multi-wavelength, high-precision, high-cadence, and long-duration data opens a new window into the time domain behavior of young stellar objects. Here we provide an overview of the observations, focusing on results from Spitzer and CoRoT. The highlight of this work is detailed analysis of 162 classical T Tauri stars for which we can probe optical and mid-infrared flux variations to 1% amplitudes and sub-hour timescales. We present a morphological variability census and then use metrics of periodicity, stochasticity, and symmetry to statistically separate the light curves into seven distinct classes, which we suggest represent different physical processes and geometric effects. We provide distributions of the characteristic timescales and amplitudes, and assess the fractional representation within each class. The largest category (>20%) are optical "dippers" having discrete fading events lasting ~1-5 days. The degree of correlation between the optical and infrared light curves is positive but weak; notably, the independently assigned optical and infrared morphology classes tend to be different for the same object. Assessment of flux variation behavior with respect to (circum)stellar properties reveals correlations of variability parameters with H$\alpha$ emission and with effective temperature. Overall, our results point to multiple origins of young star variability, including circumstellar obscuration events, hot spots on the star and/or disk, accretion bursts, and rapid structural changes in the inner disk.
  • Based on more than four weeks of continuous high cadence photometric monitoring of several hundred members of the young cluster NGC 2264 with two space telescopes, NASA's Spitzer and the CNES CoRoT (Convection, Rotation, and planetary Transits), we provide high quality, multi-wavelength light curves for young stellar objects (YSOs) whose optical variability is dominated by short duration flux bursts, which we infer are due to enhanced mass accretion rates. These light curves show many brief -- several hour to one day -- brightenings at optical and near-infrared (IR) wavelengths with amplitudes generally in the range 5-50% of the quiescent value. Typically, a dozen or more of these bursts occur in a thirty day period. We demonstrate that stars exhibiting this type of variability have large ultraviolet (UV) excesses and dominate the portion of the u-g vs. g-r color-color diagram with the largest UV excesses. These stars also have large Halpha equivalent widths, and either centrally peaked, lumpy Halpha emission profiles or profiles with blue-shifted absorption dips associated with disk or stellar winds. Light curves of this type have been predicted for stars whose accretion is dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the boundary between their magnetosphere and inner circumstellar disk, or where magneto-rotational instabilities modulate the accretion rate from the inner disk. Amongst the stars with the largest UV excesses or largest Halpha equivalent widths, light curves with this type of variability greatly outnumber light curves with relatively smooth sinusoidal variations associated with long-lived hot spots. We provide quantitative statistics for the average duration and strength of the accretion bursts and for the fraction of the accretion luminosity associated with these bursts.
  • We present multi-wavelength (VRIJHK) observations of KH 15D obtained in 2012/13, as well as a master table of standard photometry spanning the years 1967 to 2013. The system is a close, eccentric T Tauri binary embedded in an inclined precessing circumbinary (CB) ring. The most recent data show the continued rise of star B with respect to the trailing edge of the occulting horizon as the system's maximum brightness steadily increases. The wealth of data in time and wavelength domains allows us to track the long-term CCD color evolution of KH 15D. We find that the V-I behavior is consistent with direct and scattered light from the composite color of two stars with slightly different temperatures. There is no evidence for any reddening or bluing associated with extinction or scattering by ISM-sized dust grains. Furthermore, we probe the system's faint phase behavior at near-infrared wavelengths in order to investigate extinction properties of the ring and signatures of a possible shepherding planet sometimes invoked to confine the CB ring at ~ 5 AU. The wavelength independence of eclipse depth at second contact is consistent with the ring material being fully opaque to 2.2 microns. The color-magnitude diagrams demonstrate excess flux in J and H at low light levels, which may be due to the presence of a hot, young Jupiter-mass planet.
  • The eclipsing binary Theta1 Orionis B1, variable star designation BM Ori, is the faintest of the four well-known Trapezium stars at the heart of the Orion Nebula. The primary is a B3 star (~6Msun) but the nature of the secondary (~2Msun) has long been mysterious, since the duration and shape of primary eclipse are inappropriate for ordinary stars. Here we report nearly continuous photometric observations obtained with the MOST satellite over ~4 cycles of the 6.47d binary period. The light curve is of unprecedented quality, revealing a deep, symmetric primary eclipse as well as a clear reflection effect and secondary eclipse. In addition, there are other small disturbances, some of which repeat at the same phase over the four cycles monitored. The shape of the primary light curve has clearly evolved significantly over the past 40 yr. While its overall duration and depth have remained roughly constant, the slopes of the descent and ascent phases are significantly shallower now than in the past and its distinctive flat-bottomed "pseudo-totality" is much less obvious or even absent in the most recent data. We further demonstrate that the primary eclipse was detected at X-ray wavelengths during the Chandra COUP study. The light curve continues to be well modeled by a self-luminous and reflective disk-shaped object seen nearly edge-on orbiting the primary. The dramatic change in shape over four decades is modeled as an opacity variation in a tenuous outer envelope or disk of the secondary object. We presume that the secondary is an extremely young protostar at an earlier evolutionary phase than can be commonly observed elsewhere in the Galaxy and that the opacity variations observed are related to its digestion of some accreted matter over the last 50-100 yr. Indeed, this object deserves continued observational and theoretical attention as the youngest known eclipsing binary system.
  • Following two years of complete occultation of both stars by its opaque circumbinary ring, the binary T Tauri star KH 15D has abruptly brightened again during apastron phases, reaching I = 15 mag. Here, we show that the brightening is accompanied by a change in spectral class from K6/K7 (the spectral class of star A) to ~K1, and a bluing of the system in V-I by about 0.3 mag. A radial velocity measurement confirms that, at apastron, we are now seeing direct light from star B, which is more luminous and of earlier spectral class than star A. Evidently, the trailing edge of the occulting screen has just become tangent to one anse of star B's projected orbit. This confirms a prediction of the precession models, supports the view that the tilted ring is self-gravitating, and ushers in a new era of the system's evolution that should be accompanied by the same kind of dramatic phenomena observed from 1995-2009. It also promotes KH 15D from a single-lined to a double-lined eclipsing binary, greatly enhancing its value for testing pre-main sequence models. The results of our study strengthen the case for truncation of the outer ring at around 4 AU by a sub-stellar object such as an extremely young giant planet. The system is currently at an optimal configuration for detecting the putative planet and we urge expedient follow-up observations.
  • We have obtained 48 high resolution echelle spectra of the pre-main sequence eclipsing binary system KH~15D (V582 Mon, P = 48.37 d, $e$ $\sim$ 0.6, M$_{A}$ = 0.6 M$_{\odot}$, M$_{B}$ = 0.7 M$_{\odot}$). The eclipses are caused by a circumbinary disk seen nearly edge on, which at the epoch of these observations completely obscured the orbit of star B and a large portion of the orbit of star A. The spectra were obtained over five contiguous observing seasons from 2001/2002 to 2005/2006 while star A was fully visible, fully occulted, and during several ingress and egress events. The H$\alpha$ line profile shows dramatic changes in these time series data over timescales ranging from days to years. A fraction of the variations are due to "edge effects" and depend only on the height of star A above or below the razor sharp edge of the occulting disk. Other observed variations depend on the orbital phase: the H$\alpha$ emission line profile changes from an inverse P Cygni type profile during ingress to an enhanced double-peaked profile, with both a blue and red emission component, during egress. Each of these interpreted variations are complicated by the fact that there is also a chaotic, irregular component present in these profiles. We find that the complex data set can be largely understood in the context of accretion onto the stars from a circumbinary disk with gas flows as predicted by the models of eccentric T Tauri binaries put forward by Artymowicz & Lubow, G\"{u}nther & Kley, and de Val-Borro et al. In particular, our data provide strong support for the pulsed accretion phenomenon, in which enhanced accretion occurs during and after perihelion passage.
  • Photometry of the unique pre-main sequence binary system KH 15D is presented, spanning the years 2005-2010. This system has exhibited photometric variations and eclipses over the last 50 years caused by a precessing circumbinary disk. Advancement of the occulting edge across the binary orbit has continued and the photospheres of both stars are now completely obscured at all times. The system is now visible only by scattered light, and yet it continues to show a periodic variation on the orbital cycle with an amplitude exceeding two magnitudes. This variation, which depends only on the binary phase, has likely been present in the data since at least 1995. It can, by itself, account for shoulders on the light curve prior to ingress and following egress, obviating the need for components of extant models such as a scattering halo around star A or forward scattering from a fuzzy disk edge. A plausible source for the variable scattering component is reflected light from the far side of a warped occulting disk. We have detected color changes in V-I of several tenths of a magnitude to both the blue and red that occur during times of minima. These may indicate the presence of a third source of light (faint star) within the system, or a change in the reflectance properties of the disk as the portion being illuminated varies with the orbital motion of the stars. The data support a picture of the circumbinary disk as a geometrically thin, optically thick layer of perhaps mm or cm-sized particles that has been sculpted by the binary stars and possibly other components into a decidedly nonplanar configuration. A simple (infinitely sharp) knife-edge model does a good job of accounting for all of the recent (2005-2010) occultation data.
  • We present evidence that the spectroscopically identified bipolar jets of the pre-main sequence binary KH 15D are a common product of the whole binary system, rather than being launched from either star individually. They may be launched from the innermost part of the circumbinary disk (CBD) or may result from the merging of two outflows driven by the individual stars. This evidence is based on high-resolution H-alpha and [OI] 6300A line profiles obtained during eclipse phases of this nearly edge-on system. The occultation of star A (the only currently visible star) by the disk strongly suppresses the stellar H-alpha and continuum emission and allows one to study the faint redshifted and blueshifted emission components of the bipolar jets. The strongest evidence for jet production by the whole binary system comes from the observed radial velocity symmetry of the two jet components relative to the systemic velocity of the binary, in combination with current accretion models from the CBD onto a binary system.
  • We show that grains have grown to ~mm size (sand sized) or larger in the terrestrial zone (within ~3 AU) of the protoplanetary disk surrounding the 3 Myr old binary star KH 15D. We also argue that the reflected light in the system reaches us by back scattering off the far side of the same ring whose near side causes the obscuration.
  • We present a review of precursor observing programs for the SIM PlanetQuest Key project devoted to detecting Jupiter mass planets around young stars. In order to ensure that the stars in the sample are free of various sources of astrometric noise that might impede the detection of planets, we have initiated programs to collect photometry, high contrast images, interferometric data and radial velocities for stars in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. We have completed a high contrast imaging survey of target stars in Taurus and the Pleiades and found no definitive common proper motion companions within one arcsecond (140 AU) of the SIM targets. Our radial velocity surveys have shown that many of the target stars in Sco-Cen are fast rotators and a few stars in Taurus and the Pleiades may have sub-stellar companions. Interferometric data of a few stars in Taurus show no signs of stellar or sub-stellar companions with separations of <5 mas. The photometric survey suggests that approximately half of the stars initially selected for this program are variable to a degree (1 sigma>0.1 mag) that would degrade the astrometric accuracy achievable for that star. While the precursor programs are still a work in progress, we provide a comprehensive list of all targets ranked according to their viability as a result of the observations taken to date. By far, the observable that moves the most targets from the SIM-YSO program is photometric variability.
  • We present some results from a UVI photometric study of a field in the young open cluster NGC 2264 aimed, in part, at testing whether accretion in pre-main sequence stars is linked to rotation. We confirm that U-V excess is well correlated with H-alpha equivalent width for the stars in our sample. We show that for the more massive stars in the cluster sample (roughly 0.4-1.2 M_sun) there is also a significant association between U-V excess and rotation, in the sense that slow rotators are more likely to show excess U-band emission and variability. This constitutes significant new evidence in support of the disk-locking paradigm.
  • The unique eclipsing, weak-lined T Tauri star KH 15D has been detected as an X-ray source in a 95.7 ks exposure from the Chandra X-ray Observatory archives. A maximum X-ray luminosity of 1.5 x 10^{29} erg s$^{-1}$ is derived in the 0.5--8 keV band, corresponding to L_{X}/L_bol = 7.5 x 10^{-5}. Comparison with samples of stars of similar effective temperature in NGC 2264 and in the Orion Nebula Cluster shows that this is about an order of magnitude low for a typical star of its mass and age. We argue that the relatively low luminosity cannot be attributed to absorption along the line of sight but implies a real deficiency in X-ray production. Possible causes for this are considered in the context of a recently proposed eccentric binary model for KH 15D. In particular, we note that the visible component rotates rather slowly for a weak-lined T Tauri star and has possibly been pseudosynchronized by tidal interaction with the primary near periastron.
  • We present the results of a high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring program of the eclipsing pre-main-sequence star KH 15D that reveal it to be a single-line spectroscopic binary. We find that the best-fit Keplerian model has a period P = 48.38 days, which is nearly identical to the photometric period. Thus, we find the best explanation for the periodic dimming of KH 15D is that the binary motion carries the currently visible star alternately above and below the edge of an obscuring cloud. The data are consistent with the models involving an inclined circumstellar disk, as recently proposed by Winn et al. (2004) and Chiang & Murray-Clay (2004). We show that the mass ratio expected from models of PMS evolution, together with the mass constraints for the visible star, restrict the orbital eccentricity to 0.68 < e < 0.80 and the mass function to 0.125 < Fm < 0.5 Msun.
  • We have monitored four fields containing nine previously identified members of the MBM 12 association to search for photometric variability and periodicity in these pre-main sequence stars. Seven of the nine are found to be variable and definite periodicity (of 1.2, 2.6 and 6.2 days) is found for three of them, including the classical T Tauri star LkH-alpha 264. Two other members are possibly periodic but each requires confirmation. In addition, a "field" star that is associated with the X-ray source RX J0255.9+2005 was discovered to be a variable with a period of 4.2 days. Our results indicate that the photometric variability characteristics of the known MBM 12 association members are typical of what is found in ~few My old stellar groups such as IC 348, supporting arguments for a similar age. In particular, there is a mix of periodic and non-periodic variables with typical amplitudes (in Cousins I) of 0.1-0.5 mag, in addition to a small number of larger amplitude variables. The periods, as a group, are somewhat shorter than in IC 348 but when allowance is made for the known dependence of period on mass in pre-main sequence stars the difference may not be significant. Our data confirm and illustrate the value of photometric monitoring as a tool for identifying likely association members and for studying rotation in extremely young stellar groups.
  • We present high resolution (R $\sim$ 44,000) UVES spectra of the eclipsing pre-main sequence star KH 15D covering the wavelength range 4780 to 6810 {\AA} obtained at three phases: out of eclipse, near minimum light and during egress. The system evidently acts like a natural coronagraph, enhancing the contrast relative to the continuum of hydrogen and forbidden emission lines during eclipse. At maximum light the H$\alpha$ equivalent width was $\sim$2 {\AA} and the profile showed broad wings and a deep central absorption. During egress the equivalent width was much higher ($\sim$70 {\AA}) and the broad wings, which extend to $\pm$ 300 km/s, were prominent. During eclipse totality the equivalent width was less than during egress ($\sim$40 {\AA}) and the high velocity wings were much weaker. H$\beta$ showed a somewhat different behavior, revealing only the blue-shifted portion of the high velocity component during eclipse and egress. [OI] $\lambda\lambda$6300, 6363 lines are easily seen both out of eclipse and when the photosphere is obscured and exhibit little or no flux variation with eclipse phase. Our interpretation is that KH 15D, although clearly a weak-line T Tauri star by the usual criteria, is still accreting matter from a circumstellar disk, and has a well-collimated bipolar jet. As the knife-edge of the occulting matter passes across the close stellar environment it is evidently revealing structure in the magnetosphere of this pre-main sequence star with unprecedented spatial resolution. We also show that there is only a small, perhaps marginally significant, change in the velocity of the K7 star between the maximum light and egress phases probed here.