• To date, over 220 emission nebulae in M33 have been identified as supernova remnants (SNRs) or SNR candidates, principally through [SII]:Halpha line ratios that are elevated compared to those in H II regions. In many cases, the determination of a high [SII]:Halpha line ratio was made using narrow-band interference filter images and has not been confirmed spectroscopically. Here we present MMT 6.5 m optical spectra that we use to measure [SII]:Halpha and other line ratios in an attempt to determine the nature of these suggested candidates. Of the 197 objects in our sample, 120 have no previously published spectroscopic observations. We confirm that the majority of candidate SNRs have emission line ratios characteristic of SNRs. While no candidates show Doppler-broadened lines expected from young, ejecta-dominated SNRs (> 1000 km/s), a substantial number do exhibit lines that are broader than H II regions. We argue that the majority of the objects with high [SII]:Halpha line ratios (>0.4) are indeed SNRs, but at low surface brightness the distinction between H II regions and SNRs becomes less obvious, and additional criteria, such as X-ray detection, are needed. We discuss the properties of the sample as a whole and compare it with similar samples in other nearby galaxies.
  • We have carried out a study of the X-ray properties of the supernova remnant (SNR) population in M33 with XMM-Newton, comprising deep observations of 8 fields in M33 covering all of the area within the D$_{25}$ contours, and with a typical luminosity of 7.1$\times$10$^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (0.2-2.0 keV) . Here we report our work to characterize the X-ray properties of the previously identified SNRs in M33, as well as our search for new X-ray detected SNRs. With our deep observations and large field of view we have detected 105 SNRs at the 3$\sigma$ level, of which 54 SNRs are newly detected in X-rays, and three are newly discovered SNRs. Combining XMM-Newton data with deep Chandra survey data allows detailed spectral fitting of 15 SNRs, for which we have measured temperatures, ionization timescales, and individual abundances. This large sample of SNRs allows us to construct an X-ray luminosity function, and compare its shape to luminosity functions from host galaxies of differing metallicities and star formation rates to look for environmental effects on SNR properties. We conclude that while metallicity may play a role in SNR population characteristics, differing star formation histories on short timescales, and small-scale environmental effects appear to cause more significant differences between X-ray luminosity distributions. In addition, we analyze the X-ray detectability of SNRs, and find that in M33 SNRs with higher [SII]/H$\alpha$ ratios, as well as those with smaller galactocentric distances, are more detectable in X-rays.
  • The standard disk is often inadequate to model disk-dominated cataclysmic variables (CVs) and generates a spectrum that is bluer than the observed UV spectra [Puebla et al 2007]. X-ray observations of these systems reveal an optically thin boundary layer (BL) expected to appear as an inner hole in the disk. Consequently, we truncate the inner disk. However, instead of removing the inner disk, we impose the no-shear boundary condition at the truncation radius, thereby lowering the disk temperature and generating a spectrum that better fits the UV data. With our modified disk, we analyze the archival UV spectra of three novalikes that cannot be fitted with standard disks. For the VY Scl systems MV Lyr and BZ Cam, we fit a hot inflated white dwarf WD with a cold modified disk ($\dot{M} \sim $ a few $10^{-9}M_{\odot}$/yr). For V592 Cas, the slightly modified disk ($\dot{M} \sim 6 \times 10^{-9}M_{\odot}$/yr) completely dominates the UV. These results are consistent with Swift X-ray observations of these systems [Balman et al 2014], revealing BLs merged with ADAF-like flows and/or hot coronae, where the advection of energy is likely launching an outflow and heating the WD, thereby explaining the high WD temperature in VY Scl systems. This is further supported by the fact that the X-ray hardness ratio increases with the shallowness of the UV slope in a small CV sample we examine. Furthermore, for 105 disk-dominated systems, the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra UV slope decreases in the same order as the ratio of the X-ray flux to optical/UV flux: from SU UMa's, to U Gem's, Z Cam's, UX UMa's, and VY Scl's.
  • We report the results from a spectrophotometric study sampling the roughly 300 candidate supernova remnants (SNRs) in M83 identified through optical imaging with Magellan/IMACS and HST/WFC3. Of the 118 candidates identified based on a high [S II] $\lambda\lambda$ 6716,6731 to H$\alpha$ emission ratio, 117 show spectroscopic signatures of shock-heated gas, confirming them as SNRs---the largest uniform set of SNR spectra for any galaxy. Spectra of 22 objects with a high [O III] 5007 $\lambda$ to H$\alpha$ emission ratio, selected in an attempt to identify young ejecta-dominated SNRs like Cas A, reveal only one (previously reported) object with the broad (over 1000 km/s) emission lines characteristic of ejecta-dominated SNRs, beyond the known SN1957D remnant. The other 20 [O III]-selected candidates include planetary nebulae, compact H II regions, and one background QSO. Although our spectroscopic sample includes 22 SNRs smaller than 11 pc, none of the other objects shows broad emission lines; instead their spectra stem from relatively slow (< 200 km/s) radiative shocks propagating into the metal-rich interstellar medium of M83. With six SNe in the past century, one might expect more of M83's small-diameter SNRs to show evidence of ejecta; this appears not to be the case. We attribute their absence to several factors, including that SNRs expanding into a dense medium evolve quickly to the ISM-dominated phase, and that SNRs expanding into regions already evacuated by earlier SNe are probably very faint.
  • Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), SXP214 is an X-ray pulsar in a high mass X-ray binary system with a Be-star companion. A recent survey of the SMC under a Chandra X-ray Visionary program found the source in a transition when the X-ray flux was on a steady rise. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram revealed a pulse period of 211.49 +/- 0.42 s, which is significantly (>5sigma) shorter than the previous measurements with XMM-Newton and RXTE. This implies that the system has gone through sudden spin-up episodes recently. The pulse profile shows a sharp eclipse-like feature with a modulation amplitude of >95%. The linear rise of the observed X-ray luminosity from <~2x to 7x10^35 erg s^-1 is correlated with steady softening of the X-ray spectrum, which can be described by the changes in the local absorption from N_H ~ 10^24 to <~10^20 cm^-2 for an absorbed power-law model. The soft X-ray emission below 2 keV was absent in the early part of the observation when only the pulsating hard X-ray component was observed, whereas at later times both soft and hard X-ray components were observed pulsating. A likely explanation is that the neutron star was initially hidden in the circumstellar disk of the companion, and later came out of the disk with the accreted material that continued fueling the observed pulsation.
  • We present results of a complete integral field survey of the bright SNR N49 in the LMC, obtained with the WiFeS instrument mounted on the ANU 2.3m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory. From theoretical shock modelling with the new MAPPINGS 5.1 code we have, for the first time, subjected the optical Fe emission line spectrum of a supernova remnant to a detailed abundance and dynamical analysis covering 8 separate stages of ionisation. This allows us to derive the dust depletion factors as a function of ionisation stage. We have shown that there is substantial (30% - 90%) destruction of Fe-bearing dust grains in these fast shocks ($v_s \sim 250$ km/s), and we have confirmed that the dominant dust destruction is through the non-thermal sputtering and grain-grain collision mechanisms developed in a number of theoretical works.
  • We report on the proper motions of Balmer-dominated filaments in Kepler's supernova remnant using high resolution images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by about 10 years. We use the improved proper motion measurements and revised values of shock velocities to derive a distance to Kepler of 5.1 [+0.8, -0.7] kpc. The main shock around the northern rim of the remnant has a typical speed of 1690 km/s and is encountering material with densities of about 8 cm^-3. We find evidence for the variation of shock properties over small spatial scales, including differences in the driving pressures as the shock wraps around a curved cloud surface. We find that the Balmer filaments ahead of the ejecta knot on the northwest boundary of the remnant are becoming fainter and more diffuse. We also find that the Balmer filaments associated with circumstellar material in the interior regions of the remnant are due to shocks with significantly lower velocities and that the brightness variations among these filaments trace the density distribution of the material, which may have a disk-like geometry.
  • We have obtained a deep 8-field XMM-Newton mosaic of M33 covering the galaxy out to the D$_{25}$ isophote and beyond to a limiting 0.2--4.5 keV unabsorbed flux of 5$\times$10$^{-16}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ (L${>}$4$\times$10$^{34}$ erg s$^{-1}$ at the distance of M33). These data allow complete coverage of the galaxy with high sensitivity to soft sources such as diffuse hot gas and supernova remnants. Here we describe the methods we used to identify and characterize 1296 point sources in the 8 fields. We compare our resulting source catalog to the literature, note variable sources, construct hardness ratios, classify soft sources, analyze the source density profile, and measure the X-ray luminosity function. As a result of the large effective area of XMM-Newton below 1 keV, the survey contains many new soft X-ray sources. The radial source density profile and X-ray luminosity function for the sources suggests that only $\sim$15% of the 391 bright sources with L${>}$3.6$\times$10$^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$ are likely to be associated with M33, and more than a third of these are known supernova remnants. The log(N)--log(S) distribution, when corrected for background contamination, is a relatively flat power-law with a differential index of 1.5, which suggests many of the other M33 sources may be high-mass X-ray binaries. Finally, we note the discovery of an interesting new transient X-ray source, which we are unable to classify.
  • As part of a spectroscopic survey of supernova remnant candidates in M83 using the Gemini-South telescope and GMOS, we have discovered one object whose spectrum shows very broad lines at H$\alpha$, [O~I] 6300,6363, and [O~III] 4959,5007, similar to those from other objects classified as `late time supernovae.' Although six historical supernovae have been observed in M83 since 1923, none were seen at the location of this object. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images show a nearly unresolved emission source, while Chandra and ATCA data reveal a bright X-ray source and nonthermal radio source at the position. Objects in other galaxies showing similar spectra are only decades post-supernova, which raises the possibility that the supernova that created this object occurred during the last century but was missed. Using photometry of nearby stars from the HST data, we suggest the precursor was at least 17 $\rm M_{sun}$, and the presence of broad H$\alpha$ in the spectrum makes a type II supernova likely. The supernova must predate the 1983 VLA radio detection of the object. We suggest examination of archival images of M83 to search for evidence of the supernova event that gave rise to this object, and thus provide a precise age.
  • The transient ULX in M83 that went into outburst in or shortly before 2010 is still active. Our new XMM-Newton spectra show that it has a curved spectrum typical of the upper end of the high/soft state or slim-disk state. It appears to be spanning the gap between Galactic stellar-mass black holes and the ultraluminous state, at X-ray luminosities $\approx (1$-$3) \times 10^{39}$ erg s$^{-1}$ (a factor of two lower than in the 2010-2011 Chandra observations). From its broadened disk-like spectral shape at that luminosity, and from the fitted inner-disk radius and temperature, we argue that the accreting object is an ordinary stellar-mass black hole with $M \sim$$10$-$20 M_{\odot}$. We suggest that in the 2010-2011 Chandra observations, the source was seen at a higher accretion rate, resulting in a power-law-dominated spectrum with a soft excess at large radii.
  • We analyze the expansion of hydrogen-poor knots and filaments in the born-again planetary nebulae A30 and A78 based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images obtained almost 20 yr apart. The proper motion of these features generally increases with distance to the central star, but the fractional expansion decreases, i.e., the expansion is not homologous. As a result, there is not a unique expansion age, which is estimated to be 610-950 yr for A30 and 600-1140 yr for A78. The knots and filaments have experienced complex dynamical processes: the current fast stellar wind is mass loaded by the material ablated from the inner knots; the ablated material is then swept up until it shocks the inner edges of the outer, hydrogen-rich nebula. The angular expansion of the outer filaments shows a clear dependence on position angle, indicating that the interaction of the stellar wind with the innermost knots channels the wind along preferred directions. The apparent angular expansion of the innermost knots seems to be dominated by the rocket effect of evaporating gas and by the propagation of the ionization front inside them. Radiation-hydrodynamical simulations show that a single ejection of material followed by a rapid onset of the stellar wind and ionizing flux can reproduce the variety of clumps and filaments at different distances from the central star found in A30 and A78.
  • We report results from Spitzer observations of SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B, a young Type Ia supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud that shows interaction with a dense medium in its western hemisphere. Our images show that N103B has strong IR emission from warm dust in the post-shock environment. The post-shock gas density we derive, 45 cm$^{-3}$, is much higher than in other Type Ia remnants in the LMC, though a lack of spatial resolution may bias measurements towards regions of higher than average density. This density is similar to that in Kepler's SNR, a Type Ia interacting with a circumstellar medium. Optical images show H$\alpha$ emission along the entire periphery of the western portion of the shock, with [O III] and [S II] lines emitted from a few dense clumps of material where the shock has become radiative. The dust is silicate in nature, though standard silicate dust models fail to reproduce the "18 $\mu$m" silicate feature that peaks instead at 17.3 $\mu$m. We propose that the dense material is circumstellar material lost from the progenitor system, as with Kepler. If the CSM interpretation is correct, this remnant would become the second member, along with Kepler, of a class of Type Ia remnants characterized by interaction with a dense CSM hundreds of years post-explosion. A lack of N enhancement eliminates symbiotic AGB progenitors. The white dwarf companion must have been relatively unevolved at the time of the explosion.
  • We present an optical/NIR imaging survey of the face-on spiral galaxy M83, using data from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Seven fields are used to cover a large fraction of the inner disk, with observations in nine broadband and narrowband filters. In conjunction with a deep Chandra survey and other new radio and optical ground-based work, these data enable a broad range of science projects to be pursued. We provide an overview of the WFC3 data and processing and then delve into one topic, the population of young supernova remnants. We used a search method targeted toward soft X-ray sources to identify 26 new supernova remnants. Many compact emission nebulae detected in [Fe II] 1.644 micron align with known remnants and this diagnostic has also been used to identify many new remnants, some of which are hard to find with optical images. We include 37 previously identified supernova remnants that the data reveal to be <0.5'' in angular size and thus are difficult to characterize from ground-based data. The emission line ratios seen in most of these objects are consistent with shocks in dense interstellar material rather than showing evidence of ejecta. We suggest that the overall high elemental abundances in combination with high interstellar medium pressures in M83 are responsible for this result. Future papers will expand on different aspects of the these data including a more comprehensive analysis of the overall supernova remnant population.
  • Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV $\lambda$1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10" behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25" behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.
  • The Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) was a 0.9 m telescope and moderate-resolution (~3 A) far-ultraviolet (820-1850 A) spectrograph that flew twice on the space shuttle, in 1990 December (Astro-1, STS-35) and 1995 March (Astro-2, STS-67). The resulting spectra were originally archived in a non-standard format that lacked important descriptive metadata. To increase their utility, we have modified the original data-reduction software to produce a new and more user-friendly data product, a time-tagged photon list similar in format to the Intermediate Data Files (IDFs) produced by the {\it Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer} calibration pipeline. We have transferred all relevant pointing and instrument-status information from locally-archived science and engineering databases into new FITS header keywords for each data set. Using this new pipeline, we have reprocessed the entire HUT archive from both missions, producing a new set of calibrated spectral products in a modern FITS format that is fully compliant with Virtual Observatory requirements. For each exposure, we have generated quick-look plots of the fully-calibrated spectrum and associated pointing history information. Finally, we have retrieved from our archives HUT TV guider images, which provide information on aperture positioning relative to guide stars, and converted them into FITS-format image files. All of these new data products are available in the new HUT section of the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST), along with historical and reference documents from both missions. In this paper, we document the improved data-processing steps applied to the data and show examples of the new data products.
  • We report results of infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the SN 1006 remnant, carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 24 micron image from MIPS clearly shows faint filamentary emission along the northwest rim of the remnant shell, nearly coincident with the Balmer filaments that delineate the present position of the expanding shock. The 24 micron emission traces the Balmer filaments almost perfectly, but lies a few arcsec within, indicating an origin in interstellar dust heated by the shock. Subsequent decline in the IR behind the shock is presumably due largely to grain destruction through sputtering. The emission drops far more rapidly than current models predict, however, even for a higher proportion of small grains than would be found closer to the Galactic plane. The rapid drop may result in part from a grain density that has always been lower -- a relic effect from an earlier epoch when the shock was encountering a lower density -- but higher grain destruction rates still seem to be required. Spectra from three positions along the NW filament from the IRS instrument all show only a featureless continuum, consistent with thermal emission from warm dust. The dust-to-gas mass ratio in the pre-shock interstellar medium is lower than that expected for the Galactic ISM -- as has also been observed in the analysis of IR emission from other SNRs but whose cause remains unclear. As with other SN Ia remnants, SN 1006 shows no evidence for dust grain formation in the supernova ejecta.
  • We present a new optical imaging survey of supernova remnants in M83, using data obtained with the Magellan I 6.5m telescope and IMACS instrument under conditions of excellent seeing. Using the criterion of strong [S II] emission relative to Halpha, we confirm all but three of the 71 SNR candidates listed in our previous survey, and expand the SNR candidate list to 225 objects, more than tripling the earlier sample. Comparing the optical survey with a new deep X-ray survey of M83 with Chandra, we find 61 of these SNR candidates to have X-ray counterparts. We also identify an additional list of 46 [O III] -selected nebulae for follow-up as potential ejecta-dominated remnants, seven of which have associated X-ray emission that makes them strong candidates. Some of the other [O III]-bright objects could also be normal ISM-dominated supernova remnants with shocks fast enough to doubly ionize oxygen, but with Halpha and [S II] emission faint enough to have been missed. A few of these objects may also be H II regions with abnormally high [O III] emission compared with the majority of M83 H II regions, compact nebulae excited by young Wolf-Rayet stars, or even background AGN. The supernova remnant Halpha luminosity function in M83 is shifted a factor of ~ 4.5x higher than for M33 supernova remnants, indicative of a higher mean ISM density in M83. We describe the search technique used to identify the supernova remnant candidates and provide basic information and finder charts for the objects.
  • SN1957D, located in one of the spiral arms of M83, is one of the small number of extragalactic supernovae that has remained detectable at radio and optical wavelengths during the decades after its explosion. Here we report the first detection of SN1957D in X-rays, as part of a 729 ks observation of M83 with \chandra. The X-ray luminosity (0.3 - 8 keV) is 1.7 (+2.4,-0.3) 10**37 ergs/s. The spectrum is hard and highly self-absorbed compared to most sources in M83 and to other young supernova remnants, suggesting that the system is dominated at X-ray wavelengths by an energetic pulsar and its pulsar wind nebula. The high column density may be due to absorption within the SN ejecta. HST WFC3 images resolve the supernova remnant from the surrounding emission and the local star field. Photometry of stars around SN1957D, using WFC3 images, indicates an age of less than 10**7 years and a main sequence turnoff mass more than 17 solar masses. New spectra obtained with Gemini-South show that the optical spectrum continues to be dominated by broad [O III] emission lines, the signature of fast-moving SN ejecta. The width of the broad lines has remained about 2700 km/s (FWHM). The [O III] flux dropped precipitously between 1989 and 1991, but continued monitoring shows the flux has been almost constant since. In contrast, radio observations over the period 1990-2011 show a decline rate inf the flux proportional to t**-4, far steeper than the rate observed earlier, suggesting that the primary shock has overrun the edge of a pre-SN wind.
  • Characterization of the relatively poorly-understood progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae is of great importance in astrophysics, particularly given the important cosmological role that these supernovae play. Kepler's Supernova Remnant, the result of a Type Ia supernova, shows evidence for an interaction with a dense circumstellar medium (CSM), suggesting a single-degenerate progenitor system. We present 7.5-38 $\mu$m infrared (IR) spectra of the remnant, obtained with the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope}, dominated by emission from warm dust. Broad spectral features at 10 and 18 $\mu$m, consistent with various silicate particles, are seen throughout. These silicates were likely formed in the stellar outflow from the progenitor system during the AGB stage of evolution, and imply an oxygen-rich chemistry. In addition to silicate dust, a second component, possibly carbonaceous dust, is necessary to account for the short-wavelength IRS and IRAC data. This could imply a mixed chemistry in the atmosphere of the progenitor system. However, non-spherical metallic iron inclusions within silicate grains provide an alternative solution. Models of collisionally-heated dust emission from fast shocks ($>$ 1000 km s$^{-1}$) propagating into the CSM can reproduce the majority of the emission associated with non-radiative filaments, where dust temperatures are $\sim 80-100$ K, but fail to account for the highest temperatures detected, in excess of 150 K. We find that slower shocks (a few hundred km s$^{-1}$) into moderate density material ($n_{0} \sim 50-250$ cm$^{-3}$) are the only viable source of heating for this hottest dust. We confirm the finding of an overall density gradient, with densities in the north being an order of magnitude greater than those in the south.
  • A previously undetected X-ray source (L_X<10**36 erg/s) in the strongly star-forming galaxy M83 entered an ultraluminous state between August 2009 and December 2010. It was first seen with Chandra on 23 December 2010 at L_X ~ 4 10**39 ergs/s, and has remained ultraluminous through our most recent observations in December 2011, with typical flux variation of a factor of two. The spectrum is well fitted by a combination of absorbed power-law and disk black-body models. While the relative contributions of the models varies with time, we have seen no evidence for a canonical state transition. The luminosity and spectral properties are consistent with accretion powered by a black hole with M_BH ~ 40-100 solar masses. In July 2011 we found a luminous, blue optical counterpart which had not been seen in deep HST observations obtained in August 2009. These optical observations suggest that the donor star is a low-mass star undergoing Roche-lobe overflow, and that the blue optical emission seen during the outburst is coming from an irradiated accretion disk. This source shows that ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) with low-mass companions are an important component of the ULX population in star-forming galaxies, and provides further evidence that the blue optical counterparts of some ULXs need not indicate a young, high-mass companion, but rather that they may indicate X-ray reprocessing.
  • We present mid-infrared continuum and emission line images of the Galactic oxygen-rich supernova remnant (SNR) G292.0+1.8, acquired using the MIPS and IRS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The MIPS 24 micron and 70 micron images of G292.0+1.8 are dominated by continuum emission from a network of filaments encircling the SNR. The morphology of the SNR, as seen in the mid-infrared, resembles that seen in X-rays with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Most of the mid-infrared emission in the MIPS images is produced by circumstellar dust heated in the non-radiative shocks around G292.0+1.8, confirming the results of earlier mid-IR observations with AKARI. In addition to emission from hot dust, we have also mapped atomic line emission between 14 micron and 36 micron using IRS spectral maps. The line emission is primarily associated with the bright oxygen-rich optical knots, but is also detected from fast-moving knots of ejecta. We confirm our earlier detection of 15-25 micron emission characteristic of magnesium silicate dust in spectra of the radiatively shocked ejecta. We do not detect silicon line emission from any of the radiatively shocked ejecta in the southeast of the SNR, possibly because that the reverse shock has not yet penetrated most of the Si-rich ejecta in that region. This may indicate that G292.0+1.8 is less evolved in the southeast than the rest of the SNR, and may be further evidence in favor of an asymmetric SN explosion as proposed in recent X-ray studies of G292.0+1.8.
  • We report results from a multi-wavelength analysis of the Galactic SNR RCW 86, the proposed remnant of the supernova of 185 A.D. We report new infrared observations from {\it Spitzer} and {\it WISE}, where the entire shell is detected at 24 and 22 $\mu$m. We fit the infrared flux ratios with models of collisionally heated ambient dust, finding post-shock gas densities in the non-radiative shocks of 2.4 and 2.0 cm$^{-3}$ in the SW and NW portions of the remnant, respectively. The Balmer-dominated shocks around the periphery of the shell, large amount of iron in the X-ray emitting ejecta, and lack of a compact remnant support a Type Ia origin for this remnant. From hydrodynamic simulations, the observed characteristics of RCW 86 are successfully reproduced by an off-center explosion in a low-density cavity carved by the progenitor system. This would make RCW 86 the first known case of a Type Ia supernova in a wind-blown bubble. The fast shocks ($> 3000$ km s$^{-1}$) observed in the NE are propagating in the low-density bubble, where the shock is just beginning to encounter the shell, while the slower shocks elsewhere have already encountered the bubble wall. The diffuse nature of the synchrotron emission in the SW and NW is due to electrons that were accelerated early in the lifetime of the remnant, when the shock was still in the bubble. Electrons in a bubble could produce gamma-rays by inverse-Compton scattering. The wind-blown bubble scenario requires a single-degenerate progenitor, which should leave behind a companion star.
  • We investigate the ionization structure of the nebular gas in M83 using the line diagnostic diagram, [O III](5007 \degA)/H{\beta} vs. [S II](6716 \deg A+6731 \deg A)/H{\alpha} with the newly available narrowband images from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We produce the diagnostic diagram on a pixel-by-pixel (0.2" x 0.2") basis and compare it with several photo- and shock-ionization models. For the photo-ionized gas, we observe a gradual increase of the log([O III]/H{\beta}) ratios from the center to the spiral arm, consistent with the metallicity gradient, as the H II regions go from super solar abundance to roughly solar abundance from the center out. Using the diagnostic diagram, we separate the photo-ionized from the shock-ionized component of the gas. We find that the shock-ionized H{\alpha} emission ranges from ~2% to about 15-33% of the total, depending on the separation criteria used. An interesting feature in the diagnostic diagram is an horizontal distribution around log([O III]/H{\beta}) ~ 0. This feature is well fit by a shock-ionization model with 2.0 Z\odot metallicity and shock velocities in the range of 250 km/s to 350 km/s. A low velocity shock component, < 200 km/s, is also detected, and is spatially located at the boundary between the outer ring and the spiral arm. The low velocity shock component can be due to : 1) supernova remnants located nearby, 2) dynamical interaction between the outer ring and the spiral arm, 3) abnormal line ratios from extreme local dust extinction. The current data do not enable us to distinguish among those three possible interpretations. Our main conclusion is that, even at the HST resolution, the shocked gas represents a small fraction of the total ionized gas emission at less than 33% of the total. However, it accounts for virtually all of the mechanical energy produced by the central starburst in M83.
  • We present results from mid-IR spectroscopic observations of two young supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) done with the {\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. We imaged SNRs B0509-67.5 and B0519-69.0 with {\it Spitzer} in 2005, and follow-up spectroscopy presented here confirms the presence of warm, shock heated dust, with no lines present in the spectrum. We use model fits to {\it Spitzer} IRS data to estimate the density of the postshock gas. Both remnants show asymmetries in the infrared images, and we interpret bright spots as places where the forward shock is running into material that is several times denser than elsewhere. The densities we infer for these objects depend on the grain omposition assumed, and we explore the effects of differing grain porosity on the model fits. We also analyze archival {\it XMM-Newton} RGS spectroscopic data, where both SNRs show strong lines of both Fe and Si, coming from ejecta, as well as strong O lines, which may come from ejecta or shocked ambient medium. We use model fits to IRS spectra to predict X-ray O line strengths for various grain models and values of the shock compression ratio. For 0509-67.5, we find that compact (solid) grain models require nearly all O lines in X-ray spectra to originate in reverse-shocked ejecta. Porous dust grains would lower the strength of ejecta lines relative to those arising in the shocked ambient medium. In 0519-69.0, we find significant evidence for a higher than standard compression ratio of 12, implying efficient cosmic-ray acceleration by the blast wave. A compact grain model is favored over porous grain models. We find that the dust-to-gas mass ratio of the ambient medium is significantly lower than what is expected in the ISM.
  • We report on the results from H{\alpha} imaging observations of the eastern limb of Tycho's supernova remnant (SN1572) using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We resolve the detailed structure of the fast, collisionless shock wave into a delicate structure of nearly edge-on filaments. We find a gradual increase of H{\alpha} intensity just ahead of the shock front, which we interpret as emission from the thin (~1") shock precursor. We find that a significant amount of the H{\alpha} emission comes from the precursor and that this could affect the amount of temperature equilibration derived from the observed flux ratio of the broad and narrow H{\alpha} components. The observed H{\alpha} emission profiles are fit using simple precursor models, and we discuss the relevant parameters. We suggest that the precursor is likely due to cosmic rays and discuss the efficiency of cosmic-ray acceleration at this position.