• An important task in computational statistics and machine learning is to approximate a posterior distribution $p(x)$ with an empirical measure supported on a set of representative points $\{x_i\}_{i=1}^n$. This paper focuses on methods where the selection of points is essentially deterministic, with an emphasis on achieving accurate approximation when $n$ is small. To this end, we present `Stein Points'. The idea is to exploit either a greedy or a conditional gradient method to iteratively minimise a kernel Stein discrepancy between the empirical measure and $p(x)$. Our empirical results demonstrate that Stein Points enable accurate approximation of the posterior at modest computational cost. In addition, theoretical results are provided to establish convergence of the method.
  • We offer a novel way of thinking about the modelling of the time-varying distributions of financial asset returns. Borrowing ideas from symbolic data analysis, we consider data representations beyond scalars and vectors. Specifically, we consider a quantile function as an observation, and develop a new class of dynamic models for quantile-function-valued (QF-valued) time series. In order to make statistical inferences and account for parameter uncertainty, we propose a method whereby a likelihood function can be constructed for QF-valued data, and develop an adaptive MCMC sampling algorithm for simulating from the posterior distribution. Compared to modelling realised measures, modelling the entire quantile functions of intra-daily returns allows one to gain more insight into the dynamic structure of price movements. Via simulations, we show that the proposed MCMC algorithm is effective in recovering the posterior distribution, and that the posterior means are reasonable point estimates of the model parameters. For empirical studies, the new model is applied to analysing one-minute returns of major international stock indices. Through quantile scaling, we further demonstrate the usefulness of our method by forecasting one-step-ahead the Value-at-Risk of daily returns.
  • As the dynamic structure of the financial markets is subject to dramatic changes, a model capable of providing consistently accurate volatility estimates must not make strong assumptions on how prices change over time. Most volatility models impose a particular parametric functional form that relates an observed price change to a volatility forecast (news impact function). We propose a new class of functional coefficient semiparametric volatility models where the news impact function is allowed to be any smooth function, and study its ability to estimate volatilities compared to the well known parametric proposals, in both a simulation study and an empirical study with real financial data. We estimate the news impact function using a Bayesian model averaging approach, implemented via a carefully developed Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling algorithm. Using simulations we show that our flexible semiparametric model is able to learn the shape of the news impact function from the observed data. When applied to real financial time series, our new model suggests that the news impact functions are significantly different in shapes for different asset types, but are similar for the assets of the same type.
  • The standard Kernel Quadrature method for numerical integration with random point sets (also called Bayesian Monte Carlo) is known to converge in root mean square error at a rate determined by the ratio $s/d$, where $s$ and $d$ encode the smoothness and dimension of the integrand. However, an empirical investigation reveals that the rate constant $C$ is highly sensitive to the distribution of the random points. In contrast to standard Monte Carlo integration, for which optimal importance sampling is well-understood, the sampling distribution that minimises $C$ for Kernel Quadrature does not admit a closed form. This paper argues that the practical choice of sampling distribution is an important open problem. One solution is considered; a novel automatic approach based on adaptive tempering and sequential Monte Carlo. Empirical results demonstrate a dramatic reduction in integration error of up to 4 orders of magnitude can be achieved with the proposed method.