• We present the data release (DR) 5 catalogue of white dwarf-main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Large Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST). The catalogue contains 876 WDMS binaries, of which 757 are additions to our previous LAMOST DR1 sample and 357 are systems that have not been published before. We also describe a LAMOST-dedicated survey that aims at obtaining spectra of photometrically-selected WDMS binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that are expected to contain cool white dwarfs and/or early type M dwarf companions. This is a population under-represented in previous SDSS WDMS binary catalogues. We determine the stellar parameters (white dwarf effective temperatures, surface gravities and masses, and M dwarf spectral types) of the LAMOST DR5 WDMS binaries and make use of the parameter distributions to analyse the properties of the sample. We find that, despite our efforts, systems containing cool white dwarfs remain under-represented. Moreover, we make use of LAMOST DR5 and SDSS DR14 (when available) spectra to measure the Na I {\lambda}{\lambda} 8183.27, 8194.81 absorption doublet and/or H{\alpha} emission radial velocities of our systems. This allows identifying 128 binaries displaying significant radial velocity variations, 76 of which are new. Finally, we cross-match our catalogue with the Catalina Surveys and identify 57 systems displaying light curve variations. These include 16 eclipsing systems, two of which are new, and nine binaries that are new eclipsing candidates. We calculate periodograms from the photometric data and measure (estimate) the orbital periods of 30 (15) WDMS binaries.
  • This is the second installment for the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) Quasar Survey, which includes quasars observed from September 2013 to June 2015. There are 9024 confirmed quasars in DR2 and 10911 in DR3. After cross-match with the SDSS quasar catalogs and NED, 12126 quasars are discovered independently. Among them 2225 quasars were released by SDSS DR12 QSO catalogue in 2014 after we finalised the survey candidates. 1801 sources were identified by SDSS DR14 as QSOs. The remaining 8100 quasars are considered as newly founded, and among them 6887 quasars can be given reliable emission line measurements and the estimated black hole masses. Quasars found in LAMOST are mostly located at low-to-moderate redshifts, with a mean value of 1.5. The highest redshift observed in DR2 and DR3 is 5. We applied emission line measurements to H$\alpha$, H$\beta$, Mg{\sc ii} and C{\sc iv}. We deduced the monochromatic continuum luminosities using photometry data, and estimated the virial black hole masses for the newly discovered quasars. Results are compiled into a quasar catalog, which will be available online.
  • We present the second paper of a series of publications aiming at obtaining a better understanding regarding the nature of type Ia supernovae (SNIa) progenitors by studying a large sample of detached F, G and K main sequence stars in close orbits with white dwarf companions (i.e. WD+FGK binaries). We employ the LAMOST (Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope) data release 4 spectroscopic data base together with GALEX (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) ultraviolet fluxes to identify 1,549 WD+FGK binary candidates (1,057 of which are new), thus doubling the number of known sources. We measure the radial velocities of 1,453 of these binaries from the available LAMOST spectra and/or from spectra obtained by us at a wide variety of different telescopes around the globe. The analysis of the radial velocity data allows us to identify 24 systems displaying more than 3sigma radial velocity variation that we classify as close binaries. We also discuss the fraction of close binaries among WD+FGK systems, which we find to be ~10 per cent, and demonstrate that high-resolution spectroscopy is required to efficiently identify double-degenerate SNIa progenitor candidates.
  • A.-L. Luo, Y.-H. Zhao, G. Zhao, L.-C. Deng, X.-W. Liu, Y.-P. Jing, G. Wang, H.-T Zhang, J.-R. Shi, X.-Q. Cui, Y.-Q. Chu, G.-P. Li, Z.-R. Bai, Y. Cai, S.-Y. Cao, Z.-H Cao, J. L. Carlin, H. Y. Chen, J.-J. Chen, K.-X. Chen, L. Chen, X.-L. Chen, X.-Y. Chen, Y. Chen, N. Christlieb, J.-R. Chu, C.-Z. Cui, Y.-Q. Dong, B. Du, D.-W. Fan, L. Feng, J.-N Fu, P. Gao, X.-F. Gong, B.-Z. Gu, Y.-X. Guo, Z.-W. Han, B.-L. He, J.-L. Hou, Y.-H. Hou, W. Hou, H.-Z. Hu, N.-S. Hu, Z.-W. Hu, Z.-Y. Huo, L. Jia, F.-H. Jiang, X. Jiang, Z.-B. Jiang, G. Jin, X. Kong, X. Kong, Y.-J. Lei, A.-H. Li, C.-H. Li, G.-W. Li, H.-N. Li, J. Li, Q. Li, S. Li, S.-S. Li, X.-N. Li, Y. Li, Y.-B. Li, Y.-P. Li, Y. Liang, C.-C. Lin, C. Liu, G.-R. Liu, G.-Q. Liu, Z.-G. Liu, W.-Z. Lu, Y. Luo, Y.-D. Mao, H. Newberg, J.-J. Ni, Z.-X. Qi, Y.-J. Qi, S.-Y. Shen, H.-M. Shi, J. Song, Y.-H. Song, D.-Q. Su, H.-J. Su, Z.-H. Tang, Q.-S. Tao, Y. Tian, D. Wang, D.-Q. Wang, F.-F. Wang, G.-M. Wang, H. Wang, H.-C. Wang, J. Wang, J.-N. Wang, J.-L. Wang, J.-P. Wang, J.-X. Wang, L. Wang, M.-X. Wang, S.-G. Wang, S.-Q. Wang, X. Wang, Y.-N. Wang, Y. Wang, Y.-F. Wang, Y.-F. Wang, P. Wei, M.-Z. Wei, H. Wu, K.-F. Wu, X.-B. Wu, Y. Wu, Y. Z. Wu, X.-Z. Xing, L.-Z. Xu, X.-Q. Xu, Y. Xu, T.-S. Yan, D.-H. Yang, H.-F. Yang, H.-Q. Yang, M. Yang, Z.-Q. Yao, Y. Yu, H. Yuan, H.-B. Yuan, H.-L. Yuan, W.-M. Yuan, C. Zhai, E.-P. Zhang, H. W. Zhang, J.-N. Zhang, L.-P. Zhang, W. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y.-X. Zhang, Z.-C. Zhang, M. Zhao, F. Zhou, X. Zhou, J. Zhu, Y.-T. Zhu, S.-C. Zou, F. Zuo
    May 7, 2015 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    The Large sky Area Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) General Survey is a spectroscopic survey that will eventually cover approximately half of the celestial sphere and collect 10 million spectra of stars, galaxies and QSOs. Objects both in the pilot survey and the first year general survey are included in the LAMOST First Data Release (DR1). The pilot survey started in October 2011 and ended in June 2012, and the data have been released to the public as the LAMOST Pilot Data Release in August 2012. The general survey started in September 2012, and completed its first year of operation in June 2013. The LAMOST DR1 includes a total of 1202 plates containing 2,955,336 spectra, of which 1,790,879 spectra have observed signal-to-noise S/N >10. All data with S/N>2 are formally released as LAMOST DR1 under the LAMOST data policy. This data release contains a total of 2,204,696 spectra, of which 1,944,329 are stellar spectra, 12,082 are galaxy spectra and 5,017 are quasars. The DR1 includes not only spectra, but also three stellar catalogues with measured parameters: AFGK-type stars with high quality spectra (1,061,918 entries), A-type stars (100,073 entries), and M stars (121,522 entries). This paper introduces the survey design, the observational and instrumental limitations, data reduction and analysis, and some caveats. Description of the FITS structure of spectral files and parameter catalogues is also provided.
  • A.-L. Luo, Y.-H. Zhao, G. Zhao, L.-C. Deng, X.-W. Liu, Y.-P. Jing, G. Wang, H.-T Zhang, J.-R. Shi, X.-Q. Cui, Y.-Q. Chu, G.-P. Li, Z.-R. Bai, Y. Cai, S.-Y. Cao, Z.-H Cao, J. L. Carlin, H. Y. Chen, J.-J. Chen, K.-X. Chen, L. Chen, X.-L. Chen, X.-Y. Chen, Y. Chen, N. Christlieb, J.-R. Chu, C.-Z. Cui, Y.-Q. Dong, B. Du, D.-W. Fan, L. Feng, J.-N Fu, P. Gao, X.-F. Gong, B.-Z. Gu, Y.-X. Guo, Z.-W. Han, B.-L. He, J.-L. Hou, Y.-H. Hou, W. Hou, H.-Z. Hu, N.-S. Hu, Z.-W. Hu, Z.-Y. Huo, L. Jia, F.-H. Jiang, X. Jiang, Z.-B. Jiang, G. Jin, X. Kong, X. Kong, Y.-J. Lei, A.-H. Li, C.-H. Li, G.-W. Li, H.-N. Li, J. Li, Q. Li, S. Li, S.-S. Li, X.-N. Li, Y. Li, Y.-B. Li, Y.-P. Li, Y. Liang, C.-C. Lin, C. Liu, G.-R. Liu, G.-Q. Liu, Z.-G. Liu, W.-Z. Lu, Y. Luo, Y.-D. Mao, H. Newberg, J.-J. Ni, Z.-X. Qi, Y.-J. Qi, S.-Y. Shen, H.-M. Shi, J. Song, Y.-H. Song, D.-Q. Su, H.-J. Su, Z.-H. Tang, Q.-S. Tao, Y. Tian, D. Wang, D.-Q. Wang, F.-F. Wang, G.-M. Wang, H. Wang, H.-C. Wang, J. Wang, J.-N. Wang, J.-L. Wang, J.-P. Wang, J.-X. Wang, L. Wang, M.-X. Wang, S.-G. Wang, S.-Q. Wang, X. Wang, Y.-N. Wang, Y. Wang, Y.-F. Wang, Y.-F. Wang, P. Wei, M.-Z. Wei, H. Wu, K.-F. Wu, X.-B. Wu, Y. Wu, Y. Z. Wu, X.-Z. Xing, L.-Z. Xu, X.-Q. Xu, Y. Xu, T.-S. Yan, D.-H. Yang, H.-F. Yang, H.-Q. Yang, M. Yang, Z.-Q. Yao, Y. Yu, H. Yuan, H.-B. Yuan, H.-L. Yuan, W.-M. Yuan, C. Zhai, E.-P. Zhang, H. W. Zhang, J.-N. Zhang, L.-P. Zhang, W. Zhang, Y. Zhang, Y.-X. Zhang, Z.-C. Zhang, M. Zhao, F. Zhou, X. Zhou, J. Zhu, Y.-T. Zhu, S.-C. Zou, F. Zuo
    May 7, 2015 astro-ph.GA, astro-ph.IM
    The Large sky Area Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) General Survey is a spectroscopic survey that will eventually cover approximately half of the celestial sphere and collect 10 million spectra of stars, galaxies and QSOs. Objects both in the pilot survey and the first year general survey are included in the LAMOST First Data Release (DR1). The pilot survey started in October 2011 and ended in June 2012, and the data have been released to the public as the LAMOST Pilot Data Release in August 2012. The general survey started in September 2012, and completed its first year of operation in June 2013. The LAMOST DR1 includes a total of 1202 plates containing 2,955,336 spectra, of which 1,790,879 spectra have observed signal-to-noise S/N >10. All data with S/N>2 are formally released as LAMOST DR1 under the LAMOST data policy. This data release contains a total of 2,204,696 spectra, of which 1,944,329 are stellar spectra, 12,082 are galaxy spectra and 5,017 are quasars. The DR1 includes not only spectra, but also three stellar catalogues with measured parameters: AFGK-type stars with high quality spectra (1,061,918 entries), A-type stars (100,073 entries), and M stars (121,522 entries). This paper introduces the survey design, the observational and instrumental limitations, data reduction and analysis, and some caveats. Description of the FITS structure of spectral files and parameter catalogues is also provided.
  • We present Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of PLCK G036.7+14.9 from the Chandra-Planck Legacy Program. The high resolution X-ray observations reveal two close subclusters, G036N and G036S, which were not resolved by previous ROSAT, optical, or recent Planck observations. We perform detailed imaging and spectral analyses and use a simplified model to study the kinematics of this system. The basic picture is that PLCK G036.7+14.9 is undergoing a major merger (mass ratio close to unity) between the two massive subclusters, with the merger largely along the line-of-sight and probably at an early stage. G036N hosts a small, moderate cool-core, while G036S has at most a very weak cool-core in the central 40 kpc region. The difference in core cooling times is unlikely to be caused by the ongoing merger disrupting a pre-existing cool-core in G036S. G036N also hosts an unresolved radio source in the center, which may be heating the gas if the radio source is extended. The Planck derived mass is higher than the X-ray measured mass of either subcluster, but is lower than the X-ray measured mass of the whole cluster, due to the fact that Planck does not resolve PLCK G036.7+14.9 into subclusters and interprets it as a single cluster. This mass discrepancy could induce significant bias to the mass function if such previously unresolved systems are common in the Planck cluster sample. High resolution X-ray observations are necessary to identify the fraction of such systems and correct such a bias for the purpose of precision cosmological studies.
  • We investigate the mass-metallicity relation and its dependence on galaxy physical properties with a sample of 703 Lyman-break analogues (LBAs) in local Universe, which have similar properties to high redshift star-forming galaxies. The sample is selected according to $\ha$ luminosity, $L(\ha)>10^{41.8}\,{\rm erg\,s^{-1}}$, and surface brightness, $I(\ha)>10^{40.5}\,{\rm erg\,s^{-1}\,kpc^{-2}}$, criteria. The mass-metallicity relation of LBAs harmoniously agrees with that of star-forming galaxies at $z \sim$ 1.4-1.7 in stellar mass range of $10^{8.5}M_{\odot}<M_{*}<10^{11}M_{\odot}$. The relation between stellar mass, metallicity and star formation rate of our sample is roughly consistent with the local fundamental metallicity relation. We find that the mass-metallicity relation shows a strong correlation with the 4000\AA\, break; galaxies with higher 4000\AA\, break typically have higher metallicity at a fixed mass, by 0.06 dex in average. This trend is independent of the methodology of metallicity. We also use the metallicity estimated by $T_{\rm e}$-method to confirm it. The scatter in mass-metallicity relation can be reduced from 0.091 to 0.077 dex by a three-dimensional relation between stellar mass, metallicity and 4000\AA\, break. The reduction of scatter in mass-metallicity relation suggests that the galaxy stellar age plays an important role as the second parameter in the mass-metallicity relation of LBAs.
  • We derive photometric redshifts (\zp) for sources in the entire ($\sim0.4$ deg$^2$) Hawaii-Hubble Deep Field-North (\hdfn) field with the EAzY code, based on point spread function-matched photometry of 15 broad bands from the ultraviolet (\bandu~band) to mid-infrared (IRAC 4.5 $\mu$m). Our catalog consists of a total of 131,678 sources. We evaluate the \zp~quality by comparing \zp~with spectroscopic redshifts (\zs) when available, and find a value of normalized median absolute deviation \sigm$=$0.029 and an outlier fraction of 5.5\% (outliers are defined as sources having $\rm |\zp - \zs|/(1+\zs) > 0.15$) for non-X-ray sources. More specifically, we obtain \sigm$=0.024$ with 2.7\% outliers for sources brighter than $R=23$~mag, \sigm$=0.035$ with 7.4\% outliers for sources fainter than $R=23$~mag, \sigm$=$0.026 with 3.9\% outliers for sources having $z<1$, and \sigm$=$0.034 with 9.0\% outliers for sources having $z>1$. Our \zp\ quality shows an overall improvement over an earlier \zp\ work that focused only on the central \hdfn\ area. We also classify each object as star or galaxy through template spectral energy distribution fitting and complementary morphological parametrization, resulting in 4959 stars and 126,719 galaxies. Furthermore, we match our catalog with the 2~Ms {\it Chandra} Deep Field-North main \xray~catalog. For the 462 matched non-stellar \xray~sources (281 having \zs), we improve their \zp~quality by adding three additional AGN templates, achieving \sigm$=0.035$ and an outlier fraction of 12.5\%. We make our catalog publicly available presenting both photometry and \zp, and provide guidance on how to make use of our catalog.
  • Using deep narrow-band $H_2S1$ and $K_{s}$-band imaging data obtained with CFHT/WIRCam, we identify a sample of 56 H$\alpha$ emission-line galaxies (ELGs) at $z=2.24$ with the 5$\sigma$ depths of $H_2S1=22.8$ and $K_{s}=24.8$ (AB) over 383 arcmin$^{2}$ area in the ECDFS. A detailed analysis is carried out with existing multi-wavelength data in this field. Three of the 56 H$\alpha$ ELGs are detected in Chandra 4 Ms X-ray observation and two of them are classified as AGNs. The rest-frame UV and optical morphologies revealed by HST/ACS and WFC3 deep images show that nearly half of the H$\alpha$ ELGs are either merging systems or with a close companion, indicating that the merging/interacting processes play a key role in regulating star formation at cosmic epoch z=2-3; About 14% are too faint to be resolved in the rest-frame UV morphology due to high dust extinction. We estimate dust extinction from SEDs. We find that dust extinction is generally correlated with H$\alpha$ luminosity and stellar mass (SM). Our results suggest that H$\alpha$ ELGs are representative of star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Applying extinction correction for individual objects, we examine the intrinsic H$\alpha$ luminosity function (LF) at $z=2.24$, obtaining a best-fit Schechter function characterized by a faint-end slope of $\alpha=-1.3$. This is shallower than the typical slope of $\alpha \sim -1.6$ in previous works based on constant extinction correction. We demonstrate that this difference is mainly due to the different extinction corrections. The proper extinction correction is thus key to recovering the intrinsic LF as the extinction globally increases with H$\alpha$ luminosity. Moreover, we find that our H$\alpha$ LF mirrors the SM function of SFGs at the same cosmic epoch. This finding indeed reflects the tight correlation between SFR and SM for the SFGs, i.e., the so-called main sequence.
  • We propose a new class of tensor-network states, which we name projected entangled simplex states (PESS), for studying the ground-state properties of quantum lattice models. These states extend the pair-correlation basis of projected entangled pair states (PEPS) to a simplex. PESS are an exact representation of the simplex solid states and provide an efficient trial wave function that satisfies the area law of entanglement entropy. We introduce a simple update method for evaluating the PESS wave function based on imaginary-time evolution and the higher-order singular-value decomposition of tensors. By applying this method to the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the kagome lattice, we obtain accurate and systematic results for the ground-state energy, which approach the lowest upper bounds yet estimated for this quantity.
  • We present the analysis of a deep Chandra observation of a ~2L_* late-type galaxy, ESO 137-002, in the closest rich cluster A3627. The Chandra data reveal a long (>40 kpc) and narrow tail with a nearly constant width (~3 kpc) to the southeast of the galaxy, and a leading edge ~1.5 kpc from the galaxy center on the upstream side of the tail. The tail is most likely caused by the nearly edge-on stripping of ESO 137-002's ISM by ram pressure, compared to the nearly face-on stripping of ESO 137-001 discussed in our previous work. Spectral analysis of individual regions along the tail shows that the gas throughout it has a rather constant temperature, ~1 keV, very close to the temperature of the tails of ESO 137-001, if the same atomic database is used. The derived gas abundance is low (~0.2 solar with the single-kT model), an indication of the multiphase nature of the gas in the tail. The mass of the X-ray tail is only a small fraction (<5%) of the initial ISM mass of the galaxy, suggesting that the stripping is most likely at an early stage. However, with any of the single-kT, double-kT and multi-kT models we tried, the tail is always "over-pressured" relative to the surrounding ICM, which could be due to the uncertainties in the abundance, thermal vs. non-thermal X-ray emission, or magnetic support in the ICM. The H-alpha data from SOAR show a ~21 kpc tail spatially coincident with the X-ray tail, as well as a secondary tail (~12 kpc long) to the east of the main tail diverging at an angle of ~23 degrees and starting at a distance of ~7.5 kpc from the nucleus. At the position of the secondary H-alpha tail, the X-ray emission is also enhanced at the ~2 sigma level. We compare the tails of ESO 137-001 and ESO 137-002, and also compare the tails to simulations. Both the similarities and differences of the tails pose challenges to the simulations. Several implications are briefly discussed.
  • We present a spectroscopic catalog of 67082 M dwarfs from the LAMOST pilot survey. For each spectrum of the catalog, spectral subtype, radial velocity, equivalent width of H${\alpha}$, a number of prominent molecular band indices and the metal sensitive parameter $\zeta$ are provided . Spectral subtype have been estimated by a remedied Hammer program (Original Hammer: Covey et al. 2007), in which indices are reselected to obtain more accurate auto-classified spectral subtypes. All spectra in this catalog have been visually inspected to confirm the spectral subtypes. Radial velocities have been well measured by our developed program which uses cross-correlation method and estimates uncertainty of radial velocity as well. We also examine the magnetic activity properties of M dwarfs traced by H${\alpha}$ emission line. The molecular band indices included in this catalog are temperature or metallicity sensitive and can be used for future analysis of the physical properties of M dwarfs. The catalog is available on the website \url{http://sciwiki.lamost.org/MCatalogPilot/}.
  • We explore the Potts model on the generalized decorated square lattice, with both nearest (J1) and next-neighbor (J2) interactions. Using the tensor renormalization-group method augmented by higher-order singular value decompositions, we calculate the spontaneous magnetization of the Potts model with q = 2, 3, and 4. The results for q = 2 allow us to benchmark our numerics using the exact solution. For q = 3, we find a highly degenerate ground state with partial order on a single sublattice, but with vanishing entropy per site, and we obtain the phase diagram as a function of the ratio J2=J1. There is no finite-temperature transition for the q = 4 case when J1 = J2, but the magnetic susceptibility diverges as the temperature goes to zero, showing that the model is critical at T = 0.
  • [Abridged] We present the results of new near-IR spectroscopic observations of passive galaxies at z>1.4 in a concentration of BzK-selected galaxies in the COSMOS field. The observations have been conducted with Subaru/MOIRCS, and have resulted in absorption lines and/or continuum detection for 18 out of 34 objects. This allows us to measure spectroscopic redshifts for a sample almost complete to K(AB)=21. COSMOS photometric redshifts are found in fair agreement overall with the spectroscopic redshifts, with a standard deviation of ~0.05; however, ~30% of objects have photometric redshifts systematically underestimated by up to ~25%. We show that these systematic offsets in photometric redshifts can be removed by using these objects as a training set. All galaxies fall in four distinct redshift spikes at z=1.43, 1.53, 1.67 and 1.82, with this latter one including 7 galaxies. SED fits to broad-band fluxes indicate stellar masses in the range of ~4-40x10^10Msun and that star formation was quenched ~1 Gyr before the cosmic epoch at which they are observed. The spectra of several individual galaxies have allowed us to measure their Hdelta_F and Dn4000 indices, which confirms their identification as passive galaxies, as does a composite spectrum resulting from the coaddition of 17 individual spectra. The effective radii of the galaxies have been measured on the HST/ACS F814W image, confirming the coexistence at these redshifts of passive galaxies which are substantially more compact than their local counterparts with others that follow the local size-stellar mass relation. For the galaxy with best S/N spectrum we were able to measure a velocity dispersion of 270+/-105 km/s, indicating that this galaxy lies closely on the virial relation given its stellar mass and effective radius.
  • D. Schlegel, F. Abdalla, T. Abraham, C. Ahn, C. Allende Prieto, J. Annis, E. Aubourg, M. Azzaro, S. Bailey. C. Baltay, C. Baugh, C. Bebek, S. Becerril, M. Blanton, A. Bolton, B. Bromley, R. Cahn, P.-H. Carton, J. L. Cervantes-Cota, Y. Chu, M. Cortes, K. Dawson, A. Dey, M. Dickinson, H. T. Diehl, P. Doel, A. Ealet, J. Edelstein, D. Eppelle, S. Escoffier, A. Evrard, L. Faccioli, C. Frenk, M. Geha, D. Gerdes, P. Gondolo, A. Gonzalez-Arroyo, B. Grossan, T. Heckman, H. Heetderks, S. Ho, K. Honscheid, D. Huterer, O. Ilbert, I. Ivans, P. Jelinsky, Y. Jing, D. Joyce, R. Kennedy, S. Kent, D. Kieda, A. Kim, C. Kim, J.-P. Kneib, X. Kong, A. Kosowsky, K. Krishnan, O. Lahav, M. Lampton, S. LeBohec, V. Le Brun, M. Levi, C. Li, M. Liang, H. Lim, W. Lin, E. Linder, W. Lorenzon, A. de la Macorra, Ch. Magneville, R. Malina, C. Marinoni, V. Martinez, S. Majewski, T. Matheson, R. McCloskey, P. McDonald, T. McKay, J. McMahon, B. Menard, J. Miralda-Escude, M. Modjaz, A. Montero-Dorta, I. Morales, N. Mostek, J. Newman, R. Nichol, P. Nugent, K. Olsen, N. Padmanabhan, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, I. Park, J. Peacock, W. Percival, S. Perlmutter, C. Peroux, P. Petitjean, F. Prada, E. Prieto, J. Prochaska, K. Reil, C. Rockosi, N. Roe, E. Rollinde, A. Roodman, N. Ross, G. Rudnick, V. Ruhlmann-Kleider, J. Sanchez, D. Sawyer, C. Schimd, M. Schubnell, R. Scoccimaro, U. Seljak, H. Seo, E. Sheldon, M. Sholl, R. Shulte-Ladbeck, A. Slosar, D. S. Smith, G. Smoot, W. Springer, A. Stril, A. S. Szalay, C. Tao, G. Tarle, E. Taylor, A. Tilquin, J. Tinker, F. Valdes, J. Wang, T. Wang, B. A. Weaver, D. Weinberg, M. White, M. Wood-Vasey, J. Yang, X. Yang. Ch. Yeche, N. Zakamska, A. Zentner, C. Zhai, P. Zhang
    June 9, 2011 astro-ph.IM
    BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (kmax = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (kmax = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.
  • We report evidence of a fully established galaxy cluster at z=2.07, consisting of a ~20sigma overdensity of red, compact spheroidal galaxies spatially coinciding with extended X-ray emission detected with XMM-Newton. We use VLT VIMOS and FORS2 spectra and deep Subaru, VLT and Spitzer imaging to estimate the redshift of the structure from a prominent z=2.07 spectroscopic redshift spike of emission-line galaxies, concordant with the accurate 12-band photometric redshifts of the red galaxies. Using NICMOS and Keck AO observations, we find that the red galaxies have elliptical morphologies and compact cores. While they do not form a tight red sequence, their colours are consistent with that of a >1.3$~Gyr population observed at z~2.1. From an X-ray luminosity of .2*10^43 erg s^-1 and the stellar mass content of the red galaxy population, we estimate a halo mass of 5.3-8*10^13 Msun, comparable to the nearby Virgo cluster. These properties imply that this structure could be the most distant, mature cluster known to date and that X-ray luminous, elliptical-dominated clusters are already forming at substantially earlier epochs than previously known.
  • We present observations of a very massive galaxy at z=1.82 which show that its morphology, size, velocity dispersion and stellar population properties that are fully consistent with those expected for passively evolving progenitors of today's giant ellipticals. These findings are based on a deep optical rest-frame spectrum obtained with the Multi-Object InfraRed Camera and Spectrograph (MOIRCS) on the Subaru telescope of a high-z passive galaxy candidate (pBzK) from the COSMOS field, for which we accurately measure its redshift of z=1.8230 and obtain an upper limit on its velocity dispersion sigma_star<326 km/s. By detailed stellar population modeling of both the galaxy broad-band SED and the rest-frame optical spectrum we derive a star-formation-weighted age and formation redshift of t_sf~1-2 Gyr and z_form~2.5-4, and a stellar mass of M_star~(3-4)x10^{11} M_sun. This is in agreement with a virial mass limit of M_vir<7x10^{11}M_sun, derived from the measured sigma_star value and stellar half-light radius, as well as with the dynamical mass limit based on the Jeans equations. In contrast with previously reported super-dense passive galaxies at z~2, the present galaxy at z=1.82 appears to have both size and velocity dispersion similar to early-type galaxies in the local Universe with similar stellar mass. This suggests that z~2 massive and passive galaxies may exhibit a wide range of properties, then possibly following quite different evolutionary histories from z~2 to z=0.
  • We present the SINS survey with SINFONI of high redshift galaxies. With 80 objects observed and 63 detected, SINS is the largest survey of spatially resolved gas kinematics, morphologies, and physical properties of star-forming galaxies at z~1-3. We describe the selection of the targets, the observations, and the data reduction. We then focus on the "SINS Halpha sample" of 62 rest-UV/optically-selected sources at 1.3<z<2.6 for which we targeted primarily the Halpha and [NII] emission lines. Only 30% of this sample had previous near-IR spectroscopic observations. As a whole, the SINS Halpha sample covers a reasonable representation of massive log(M*/Msun)>~10 star-forming galaxies at z~1.5-2.5, with some bias towards bluer systems compared to pure K-selected samples due to the requirement of secure optical redshift. The sample spans two orders of magnitude in stellar mass and in absolute and specific star formation rates, with median values of approximately log(M*/Msun) = 10.5, 70 Msun/yr, and 3/Gyr. The ionized gas distribution and kinematics are spatially resolved on scales ranging from 1.5 kpc for adaptive optics assisted observations to typically 4-5 kpc for seeing-limited data. The Halpha morphologies tend to be irregular and/or clumpy. About one-third are rotation-dominated yet turbulent disks, another third comprises compact and velocity dispersion-dominated objects, and the remaining galaxies are clear interacting/merging systems; the fraction of rotation-dominated systems increases among the more massive part of the sample. The Halpha luminosities and equivalent widths suggest on average roughly twice higher dust attenuation towards the HII regions relative to the bulk of the stars, and comparable current and past-averaged star formation rates. [Abridged]
  • We use a high-resolution $N$-body simulation to investigate the influence of background galaxy properties, including redshift, size, shape and clustering, on the efficiency of forming giant arcs by gravitational lensing of rich galaxy clusters. Two large sets of ray-tracing simulations are carried out for 10 massive clusters at two redshifts, i.e. $z_{\rm l} \sim 0.2$ and 0.3. The virial mass ($M_{\rm vir}$) of the simulated lens clusters at $z\sim0.2$ ranges from $6.8\times10^{14} h^{-1} {M_{\odot}}$ to $1.1\times 10^{15} h^{-1} M_{\odot}$. The information of background galaxies brighter than 25 magnitude in the $I$-band is taken from Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) imaging data. Around $1.7\times 10^5$ strong lensing realizations with these images as background galaxies have been performed for each set. We find that the efficiency for forming giant arcs for $z_{\rm l}=0.2$ clusters is broadly consistent with observations. The efficiency of producing giant arcs by rich clusters is weakly dependent on the source size and clustering. Our principal finding is that a small proportion ($\sim 1/3$) of galaxies with elongated shapes (e.g. ellipticity $\epsilon=1-b/a>0.5$) can boost the number of giant arcs substantially. Compared with recent studies where a uniform ellipticity distribution from 0 to 0.5 is used for the sources, the adoption of directly observed shape distribution increases the number of giant arcs by a factor of $\sim2$. Our results indicate that it is necessary to account for source information and survey parameters (such as point-spread-function, seeing) to make correct predictions of giant arcs and further to constrain the cosmological parameters.(abridged)
  • We present the X-ray properties of the extremely red objects (ERO) population observed by Chandra with three partially overlapping pointings (up to ~90 ks) over an area of ~500 arcmin^2, down to a 0.5-8 keV flux limit of ~10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. We selected EROs using a multi-band photometric catalog down to a KS-band magnitude of ~19.3 (Vega system); 14 EROs were detected in X-rays, corresponding to ~9% of the overall X-ray source population (149 X-ray sources) and to ~5% of the ERO population (288). The X-ray emission of all X-ray detected EROs is consistent with that of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) (>=3.5x10^{42} erg s-1 at photometric redshifts z > 1), in agreement with previous X-ray observations, with an indication of increasing absorption between the three X-ray brightest EROs and the 11 X-ray faintest EROs.We take advantage of the good spatial resolution and limited background provided by Chandra to place constraints on the population of the X-ray undetected EROs by a stacking analysis. Their stacked emission, whose statistical significance is 5.7sigma in the observed 0.5-8 keV band, provides an upper limit to the average intrinsic absorption at z=1 of 2.5x10^{22} cm^{-2} and corresponds to a rest-frame 0.5-8 keV luminosity of 8.9x10^{41} erg s^{-1} . We estimate that any accretion-related X-ray emission to the stacked signal is likely "diluted" by emission due to hot gas in normal galaxies and star-formation activity in dust-enshrouded galaxies at high redshift.
  • We present a simple set of kinematic criteria that can distinguish between galaxies dominated by ordered rotational motion and those involved in major merger events. Our criteria are based on the dynamics of the warm ionized gas (as traced by H-alpha) within galaxies, making this analysis accessible to high-redshift systems, whose kinematics are primarily traceable through emission features. Using the method of kinemetry (developed by Krajnovic and co-workers), we quantify asymmetries in both the velocity and velocity dispersion maps of the warm gas, and the resulting criteria enable us to empirically differentiate between non-merging and merging systems at high redshift. We apply these criteria to 11 of our best-studied rest-frame UV/optical-selected z~2 galaxies for which we have near infrared integral field spectroscopic data from SINFONI on the VLT. Of these 11 systems, we find that >50% have kinematics consistent with a single rotating disk interpretation, while the remaining systems are more likely undergoing major mergers. This result, combined with the short formation timescales of these systems, provides evidence that rapid, smooth accretion of gas plays a significant role in galaxy formation at high redshift.
  • [Abridged] Over the past two decades observations and theoretical simulations have established a global frame-work of galaxy formation and evolution in the young Universe. Galaxies formed as baryonic gas cooled at the centres of collapsing dark matter halos. Mergers of halos led to the build up of galaxy mass. A major step forward in understanding these issues requires well resolved physical information on individual galaxies at high redshift. Here we report adaptive optics, spectroscopic observations of a representative luminous star forming galaxy when the Universe was only twenty percent of its age. The superior angular resolution of these data reveals the physical and dynamical properties of a high redshift galaxy in unprecedented detail. A large and massive rotating proto-disk is channelling gas towards a growing central stellar bulge hosting an accreting massive black hole.
  • We present two samples of $\hii$ galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release 3. The electron temperatures($T_e$) of 225 galaxies are calculated with the photoionized $\hii$ model and $T_e$ of 3997 galaxies are calculated with an empirical method. The oxygen abundances from the $T_e$ methods of the two samples are determined reliably. The oxygen abundances from a strong line metallicity indicator, such as $R_{23}$, $P$, $N2$, and $O3N2$, are also calculated. We compared oxygen abundances of $\hii$ galaxies obtained with the $T_e$ method, $R_{23}$ method, $P$ method, $N2$ method, and $O3N2$method. The oxygen abundances derived with the $T_e$ method are systematically lower by $\sim$0.2 dex than those derived with the $R_{23}$ method, consistent with previous studies based on $\hii$ region samples. No clear offset for oxygen abundance was found between $T_e$ metallicity and $P$, $N2$ and $O3N2$ metallicity. When we studied the relation between N/O and O/H, we found that in the metallicity regime of $\zoh > 7.95$, the large scatter of the relation can be explained by the contribution of small mass stars to the production of nitrogen. In the high metallicity regime, $\zoh > 8.2$, nitrogen is primarily a secondary element produced by stars of all masses.
  • We have combined deep BRIz' imaging over 2x940 arcmin^2 fields obtained with the Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope with JKs imaging with the SOFI camera at the New Technology Telescope to search for high-redshift massive galaxies. K-band selected galaxies have been identified over an area of ~920 arcmin^2 to K_Vega=19.2, of which 320 arcmin^2 are complete to K_Vega=20. The BzK selection technique was used to obtain complete samples of ~500 candidate massive star-forming galaxies (sBzKs) and ~160 candidate massive, passively-evolving galaxies (pBzKs), both at 1.4<z<2.5. With the (R-K)_Vega > 5 criterion we also identified ~850 extremely red objects (EROs). The surface density of sBzKs and pBzKs is found to 1.20+/-0.05 arcmin^{-2} and 0.38+/-0.03 arcmin^{-2}, respectively. Both sBzKs and pBzKs are strongly clustered, at a level at least comparable to that of EROs, with pBzKs appearing more clustered than sBzKs. We estimate the reddening, star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses (M_*) of the sBzKs, confirming that to K_Vega~20 median values are M_*~10^{11}M_sun, SFR 190M_sun yr^{-1}, and E(B-V)~0.44. The most massive sBzKs are also the most actively star-forming, an effect which can be seen as a manifestation of downsizing at early epochs. The space density of massive pBzKs at z~1.4-2 is 20%+/-7% that of similarly massive early-type galaxies at z~0, and similar to that of sBzKs of the same mass. We argue that star formation quenching in these sBzKs will result in nearly doubling the space density of massive early-type galaxies, thus matching their local density.
  • We present MAMBO 1.2 mm observations of five BzK-pre-selected vigorous starburst galaxies at z~2. Two of these were detected at more than 99.5% confidence levels, with 1.2 mm fluxes around 1.5 mJy. These millimeter fluxes imply vigorous activity with star-formation rates (SFRs) approx. 500-1500 Msun/yr, confirmed also by detections at 24 microns with the MIPS camera on board of the Spitzer satellite. The two detected galaxies are the ones in the sample with the highest SFRs estimated from the rest-frame UV, and their far-IR- and UV-derived SFRs agree reasonably well. This is different from local ULIRGs and high-z submm/mm selected galaxies for which the UV is reported to underestimate SFRs by factors of 10-100, but similar to the average BzK-ULIRG galaxy at z~2. The two galaxies detected at 1.2 mm are brighter in K than the typical NIR-counterparts of MAMBO and SCUBA sources, implying also a significantly different K-band to submm/mm flux ratio. This suggests a scenario in which z~2 galaxies, after their rapid (sub)mm brightest phase opaque to optical/UV light, evolve into a longer lasting phase of K-band bright and massive objects. Targeting the most UV active BzKs could yield substantial detection rates at submm/mm wavelengths.