• Using isochronous mass spectrometry at the experimental storage ring CSRe in Lanzhou, the masses of $^{82}$Zr and $^{84}$Nb were measured for the first time with an uncertainty of $\sim 10$ keV, and the masses of $^{79}$Y, $^{81}$Zr, and $^{83}$Nb were re-determined with a higher precision. %The latter differ significantly from their literature values. The latter are significantly less bound than their literature values. Our new and accurate masses remove the irregularities of the mass surface in this region of the nuclear chart. Our results do not support the predicted island of pronounced low $\alpha$ separation energies for neutron-deficient Mo and Tc isotopes, making the formation of Zr-Nb cycle in the $rp$-process unlikely. The new proton separation energy of $^{83}$Nb was determined to be 490(400)~keV smaller than that in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012. This partly removes the overproduction of the $p$-nucleus $^{84}$Sr relative to the neutron-deficient molybdenum isotopes in the previous $\nu p$-process simulations.
  • Masses of $^{52g,52m}$Co were measured for the first time with an accuracy of $\sim 10$ keV, an unprecedented precision reached for short-lived nuclei in the isochronous mass spectrometry. Combining our results with the previous $\beta$-$\gamma$ measurements of $^{52}$Ni, the $T=2$, $J^{\pi}=0^+$ isobaric analog state (IAS) in $^{52}$Co was newly assigned, questioning the conventional identification of IASs from the $\beta$-delayed proton emissions. Using our energy of the IAS in $^{52}$Co, the masses of the $T=2$ multiplet fit well into the Isobaric Multiplet Mass Equation. We find that the IAS in $^{52}$Co decays predominantly via $\gamma$ transitions while the proton emission is negligibly small. According to our large-scale shell model calculations, this phenomenon has been interpreted to be due to very low isospin mixing in the IAS.
  • Isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) in storage rings is a powerful tool for mass measurements of exotic nuclei with very short half-lives down to several tens of microseconds, using a multicomponent secondary beam separated in-flight without cooling. However, the inevitable momentum spread of secondary ions limits the precision of nuclear masses determined by using IMS. Therefore, the momentum measurement in addition to the revolution period of stored ions is crucial to reduce the influence of the momentum spread on the standard deviation of the revolution period, which would lead to a much improved mass resolving power of IMS. One of the proposals to upgrade IMS is that the velocity of secondary ions could be directly measured by using two time-of-flight (double TOF) detectors installed in a straight section of a storage ring. In this paper, we outline the principle of IMS with double TOF detectors and the method to correct the momentum spread of stored ions.
  • On 2012 July 11, two solar filaments were observed in the northeast of the solar disk and their eruptions due to the interaction between them are studied by using the data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG). The eastern filament (F1) first erupted toward the northeast. During the eruption of F1, some plasma from F1 fell down and was injected to the North-East part of another filament (F2), and some plasma of F1 fell down to the northern region close to F2 and caused the plasma to brighten. Meanwhile, the North-East part of F2 first started to be active and rise, but did not erupt finally. Then the South-West part of F2 erupted successfully. Therefore, the F2's eruption is a partial filament eruption. Two associated CMEs related to the eruptions were observed by STEREO/COR1. We find two possible reasons that lead to the instability and the eruption of F2. One main reason is that the magnetic loops overlying the two filaments were partially opened by the eruptive F1 and resulted in the instability of F2. The other is that the downflows from F1 might break the stability of F2.
  • Isochronous mass spectrometry (IMS) in storage rings is a successful technique for accurate mass measurements of short-lived nuclides with relative precision of about $10^{-5}-10^{-7}$. Instabilities of the magnetic fields in storage rings are one of the major contributions limiting the achievable mass resolving power, which is directly related to the precision of the obtained mass values. A new data analysis method is proposed allowing one to minimise the effect of such instabilities. The masses of the previously measured at the CSRe $^{41}$Ti, $^{43}$V, $^{47}$Mn, $^{49}$Fe, $^{53}$Ni and $^{55}$Cu nuclides were re-determined with this method. An improvement of the mass precision by a factor of $\sim 1.7$ has been achieved for $^{41}$Ti and $^{43}$V. The method can be applied to any isochronous mass experiment irrespective of the accelerator facility. Furthermore, the method can be used as an on-line tool for checking the isochronous conditions of the storage ring.
  • Revolution frequency measurements of individual ions in storage rings require sophisticated timing detectors. One of common approaches for such detectors is the detection of secondary electrons released from a thin foil due to penetration of the stored ions. A new method based on the analysis of intensities of secondary electrons was developed which enables determination of the charge of each ion simultaneously with the measurement of its revolution frequency. Although the mass-over-charge ratios of $^{51}$Co$^{27+}$ and $^{34}$Ar$^{18+}$ ions are almost identical, and therefore, the ions can not be resolved in a storage ring, by applying the new method the mass excess of the short-lived $^{51}$Co is determined for the first time to be ME($^{51}$Co)=-27342(48) keV. Shell-model calculations in the $fp$-shell nuclei compared to the new data indicate the need to include isospin-nonconserving forces.
  • Kink instability is a possible mechanism for solar filament eruption. However, the twist of a solar filament is very difficult to directly measure from observation. In this paper, we carried out the measurement of the twist of a solar filament by analyzing its leg rotation. An inverse S-shaped filament in active region NOAA 11485 was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) on 2012 May 22. During its eruption, the leg of the filament exhibited a significant rotation motion. The 304 \AA\ images were used to uncurl along the circles, whose centers are the axis of the filament's leg. The result shows that the leg of the filament rotated up to about 510 degrees (about 2.83$\pi$) around the axis of the filament within twenty-three minutes. The maximal rotation speed reached 100 degrees per minute (about 379.9 km/s at radius 18$^\prime$$^\prime$), which is the fastest rotation speed that has been reported. We also calculated the decay index along the polarity inversion line in this active region and found that the decline of the overlying field with height is not so fast enough to trigger the torus instability. According to the condition of kink instability, it is indicating that the kink instability is the trigger mechanism for the solar filament eruption.
  • The periodic time modulations, found recently in the two-body orbital electron-capture (EC) decay of both, hydrogen-like $^{140}$Pr$^{58+}$ and $^{142}$Pm$^{60+}$ ions, with periods near to 7s and amplitudes of about 20%, were re-investigated for the case of $^{142}$Pm$^{60+}$ by using a 245 MHz resonator cavity with a much improved sensitivity and time resolution. We observed that the exponential EC decay is modulated with a period $T = 7.11(11)$s, in accordance with a modulation period $T = 7.12(11)$ s as obtained from simultaneous observations with a capacitive pick-up, employed also in the previous experiments. The modulation amplitudes amount to $a_R = 0.107(24)$ and $a_P = 0.134(27)$ for the 245 MHz resonator and the capacitive pick-up, respectively. These new results corroborate for both detectors {\it exactly} our previous findings of modulation periods near to 7s, though with {\it distinctly smaller} amplitudes. Also the three-body $\beta^+$ decays have been analyzed. For a supposed modulation period near to 7s we found an amplitude $a = 0.027(27)$, compatible with $a = 0$ and in agreement with the preliminary result $a = 0.030(30)$ of our previous experiment. These observations could point at weak interaction as origin of the observed 7s-modulation of the EC decay. Furthermore, the data suggest that interference terms occur in the two-body EC decay, although the neutrinos are not directly observed.
  • We find that a sunspot with positive polarity had an obvious counter-clockwise rotation and resulted in the formation and eruption of an inverse S-shaped filament in NOAA active region (AR) 08858 from 2000 February 9 to 10. The sunspot had two umbrae which rotated around each other by 195 degrees within about twenty-four hours. The average rotation rate was nearly 8 degrees per hour. The fastest rotation in the photosphere took place during 14:00UT to 22:01UT on February 9, with the rotation rate of nearly 16 degrees per hour. The fastest rotation in the chromosphere and the corona took place during 15:28UT to 19:00UT on February 9, with the rotation rate of nearly 20 degrees per hour. Interestingly, the rapid increase of the positive magnetic flux just occurred during the fastest rotation of the rotating sunspot, the bright loop-shaped structure and the filament. During the sunspot rotation, the inverse S-shaped filament gradually formed in the EUV filament channel. The filament experienced two eruptions. In the first eruption, the filament rose quickly and then the filament loops carrying the cool and the hot material were seen to spiral into the sunspot counterclockwise. About ten minutes later, the filament became active and finally erupted. The filament eruption was accompanied with a C-class flare and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME). These results provide evidence that sunspot rotation plays an important role in the formation and eruption of the sigmoidal active-region filament.
  • To better understand the dynamical process of active-region filament eruptions and associated flares and CMEs, we carried out a statistical study of 120 events observed by BBSO, TRACE, and t(SOHO/EIT) from 1998 to 2007 and combined filament observations with the NOAA's flare reports, MDI magnetograms, and LASCO data, to investigate the relationship between active-region filament eruptions and other solar activities. We found that 115 out of 120 filament eruptions are associated with flares. 56 out of 105 filament eruptions are found to be associated with CMEs except for 15 events without corresponding LASCO data. We note the limitation of coronagraphs duo to geometry or sensitivity, leading to many smaller CMEs that are Earth-directed or well out of the plane of sky not being detected by near-Earth spacecraft. Excluding those without corresponding LASCO data, the CME association rate of active-region filament eruptions clearly increases with X-ray flare class from about 32% for C-class flares to 100% for X-class flares. The eruptions of active-region filaments associated with Halo CMEs are often accompanied by large flares. About 92% events associated with X-class flare are associated with Halo CMEs. Such a result is due to that the Earth-directed CMEs detected as Halo CMEs are often the larger CMEs and many of the smaller ones are not detected because of the geometry and low intensity. The average speed of the associated CMEs of filament eruptions increases with X-ray flare size from 563.7 km/s for C-class flares to 1506.6 km/s for X-class flares. Moreover, the magnetic emergence and cancellation play an important role in triggering filament eruptions. These findings may be instructive to not only in respect to the modeling of active-region filament eruptions but also in predicting flares and CMEs.