• We systematically analyze X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the 7~Ms \textit{Chandra} Deep Field-South survey. On the longest timescale ($\approx~17$ years), we find only weak (if any) dependence of X-ray variability amplitudes on energy bands or obscuration. We use four different power spectral density (PSD) models to fit the anti-correlation between normalized excess variance ($\sigma^2_{\rm nxv}$) and luminosity, and obtain a best-fit power law index $\beta=1.16^{+0.05}_{-0.05}$ for the low-frequency part of AGN PSD. We also divide the whole light curves into 4 epochs in order to inspect the dependence of $\sigma^2_{\rm nxv}$ on these timescales, finding an overall increasing trend. The analysis of these shorter light curves also infers a $\beta$ of $\sim 1.3$ that is consistent with the above-derived $\beta$, which is larger than the frequently-assumed value of $\beta=1$. We then investigate the evolution of $\sigma^2_{\rm nxv}$. No definitive conclusion is reached due to limited source statistics but, if present, the observed trend goes in the direction of decreasing AGN variability at fixed luminosity toward large redshifts. We also search for transient events and find 6 notable candidate events with our considered criteria. Two of them may be a new type of fast transient events, one of which is reported here for the first time. We therefore estimate a rate of fast outbursts $\langle\dot{N}\rangle = 1.0^{+1.1}_{-0.7}\times 10^{-3}~\rm galaxy^{-1}~yr^{-1}$ and a tidal disruption event~(TDE) rate $\langle\dot{N}_{\rm TDE}\rangle=8.6^{+8.5}_{-4.9}\times 10^{-5}~\rm galaxy^{-1}~yr^{-1}$ assuming the other four long outbursts to be TDEs.
  • We search for high-redshift dropout galaxies behind the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223, a powerful cosmic lens that has revealed a number of unique objects in its field. Using the deep images from the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, we find 11 galaxies at z>7 in the MACS J1149.5+2223 cluster field, and 11 in its parallel field. The high-redshift nature of the bright z~9.6 galaxy MACS1149-JD, previously reported by Zheng et al., is further supported by non-detection in the extremely deep optical images from the HFF campaign. With the new photometry, the best photometric redshift solution for MACS1149-JD reduces slightly to z=9.44 +/- 0.12. The young galaxy has an estimated stellar mass of (7 +/- 2)X10E8 Msun, and was formed at z=13.2 +1.9-1.6 when the universe was ~300 Myr old. Data available for the first four HFF clusters have already enabled us to find faint galaxies to an intrinsic magnitude of M(UV) ~ -15.5, approximately a factor of ten deeper than the parallel fields.
  • This paper introduces EGG, the Empirical Galaxy Generator, a tool designed within the ASTRODEEP collaboration to generate mock galaxy catalogs for deep fields with realistic fluxes and simple morphologies. The simulation procedure is based exclusively on empirical prescriptions -- rather than first principles -- to provide the most accurate match with observations at 0<z<7. In particular, we consider that galaxies can be either quiescent or star-forming, and use their stellar mass (M*) and redshift (z) as the fundamental properties from which all the other observables can be statistically derived. Drawing z and M* from the observed galaxy stellar mass functions, we associate a star formation rate (SFR) to each galaxy from the tight SFR-M* main sequence, while dust attenuation, optical colors and morphologies (including bulge-to-total ratios, sizes and aspect ratios) are obtained from empirical relations that we establish from the high quality Hubble and Herschel observations available in the CANDELS fields. Random scatter is introduced in each step to reproduce the observed distributions of each parameter. Based on these observables, a panchromatic spectral energy distribution (SED) is selected for each galaxy and synthetic photometry is produced by integrating the redshifted SED in common broad-band filters. Finally, the mock galaxies are placed on the sky at random positions with a fixed angular two-point correlation function to implement basic clustering. The resulting flux catalogs reproduce accurately the observed number counts in all broad bands from the ultraviolet up to the sub-millimeter, and can be directly fed to image simulators such as Skymaker. The images can then be used to test source extraction softwares and image-based techniques such as stacking. EGG is open-source, and is made available to the community together with a set of pre-generated catalogs and images.
  • We present a new exploration of the cosmic star-formation history and dust obscuration in massive galaxies at redshifts $0.5< z<6$. We utilize the deepest 450 and 850$\mu$m imaging from SCUBA-2 CLS, covering 230arcmin$^2$ in the AEGIS, COSMOS and UDS fields, together with 100-250$\mu$m imaging from Herschel. We demonstrate the capability of the T-PHOT deconfusion code to reach below the confusion limit, using multi-wavelength prior catalogues from CANDELS/3D-HST. By combining IR and UV data, we measure the relationship between total star-formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass up to $z\sim5$, indicating that UV-derived dust corrections underestimate the SFR in massive galaxies. We investigate the relationship between obscuration and the UV slope (the IRX-$\beta$ relation) in our sample, which is similar to that of low-redshift starburst galaxies, although it deviates at high stellar masses. Our data provide new measurements of the total SFR density (SFRD) in $M_\ast>10^{10}M_\odot$ galaxies at $0.5<z<6$. This is dominated by obscured star formation by a factor of $>10$. One third of this is accounted for by 450$\mu$m-detected sources, while one fifth is attributed to UV-luminous sources (brighter than $L^\ast_{UV}$), although even these are largely obscured. By extrapolating our results to include all stellar masses, we estimate a total SFRD that is in good agreement with previous results from IR and UV data at $z\lesssim3$, and from UV-only data at $z\sim5$. The cosmic star-formation history undergoes a transition at $z\sim3-4$, as predominantly unobscured growth in the early Universe is overtaken by obscured star formation, driven by the build-up of the most massive galaxies during the peak of cosmic assembly.
  • We present the analysis of three XMM observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 7590. The source was found to have no X-ray absorption in the low spatial resolution ASCA data. The XMM observations provide a factor of 10 better spatial resolution than previous ASCA data. We find that the X-ray emission of NGC 7590 is dominated by an off-nuclear ULX and extended emission from the host galaxy. The nuclear X-ray emission is rather weak comparing with the host galaxy. Based on its very low X-ray luminosity as well as the small ratio between the 2-10 keV and the [O III] fluxes, we interpret NGC 7590 as Compton-thick rather than being an "unobscured" Seyfert 2 galaxy. Future higher resolution observations such as Chandra are crucial to shed light on the nature of NGC 7590 nucleus.
  • We present the analysis of an XMM observation of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 2992. The source was found in its highest level of X-ray activity yet detected, a factor $\sim 23.5$ higher in 2--10 keV flux than the historical minimum. NGC 2992 is known to exhibit X-ray flaring activity on timescales of days to weeks, and the XMM data provide at least factor of $\sim 3$ better spectral resolution in the Fe K band than any previously measured flaring X-ray state. We find that there is a broad feature in the \sim 5-7 keV band which could be interpreted as a relativistic Fe K$\alpha$ emission line. Its flux appears to have increased in tandem with the 2--10 keV continuum when compared to a previous Suzaku observation when the continuum was a factor of $\sim 8$ lower than that during the XMM observation. The XMM data are consistent with the general picture that increased X-ray activity and corresponding changes in the Fe K$\alpha$ line emission occur in the innermost regions of the putative accretion disk. This behavior contrasts with the behavior of other AGN in which the Fe K$\alpha$ line does not respond to variability in the X-ray.
  • We extend the study of the core of the Fe K$\alpha$ emission line at \sim 6.4 keV in Seyfert galaxies reported in Yaqoob & Padmanabhan (2004) using a larger sample observed by the Chandra High Energy Grating (HEG). Whilst heavily obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are excluded from the sample, these data offer some of the highest precision measurements of the peak energy of the Fe K$\alpha$ line, and the highest spectral resolution measurements of the width of the core of the line in unobscured and moderately obscured ($N_{H}<10^{23} \ \rm cm^{-2}$) Seyfert galaxies to date. The Fe K$\alpha$ line is detected in 33 sources, and its centroid energy is constrained in 32 sources. In 27 sources the statistical quality of the data is good enough to yield measurements of the FWHM. We find that the distribution in the line centroid energy is strongly peaked around the value for neutral Fe, with over 80% of the observations giving values in the range 6.38--6.43 keV. Including statistical errors, 30 out of 32 sources ($\sim 94%$) have a line centroid energy in the range 6.35--6.47 keV. The mean equivalent width, amongst the observations in which a non-zero lower limit could be measured, was $53 \pm 3eV. The mean FWHM from the subsample of 27 sources was $2060 \pm 230 \ \rm km \ s^{-1}$. The mean EW and FWHM are somewhat higher when multiple observations for a given source are averaged. From a comparison with the H$\beta$ optical emission-line widths (or, for one source, Br$\alpha$), we find that there is no universal location of the Fe K$\alpha$ line-emitting region relative to the optical BLR. We confirm the presence of the X-ray Baldwin effect, an anti-correlation between the Fe K$\alpha$ line EW and X-ray continuum luminosity. The HEG data have enabled isolation of this effect to the narrow core of the Fe K$\alpha$ line.
  • The new $XMM-Newton$ data of seven Seyfert 2 galaxies with optical spectropolarimetric observations are presented. The analysis of 0.5 -- 10 keV spectra shows that all four Seyfert 2 galaxies with polarized broad lines (PBLs) are absorbed with $N_{\rm H}<10^{24}$ cm$^{-2}$, while two of three Seyfert 2 galaxies without PBLs have evidence suggesting Compton-thick obscuration, supporting the conclusion that Seyfert 2 galaxies without PBLs are more obscured than those with PBLs. Adding the measured obscuration indicators ($N_{\rm H}$, $T$ ratio, and Fe K$\alpha$ line EW) of six luminous AGNs to our previous sample improves the significance level of the difference in absorption from 92.3% to 96.3% for $N_{\rm H}$, 99.1% to 99.4% for $T$ ratio, and 95.3% to 97.4% for Fe K$\alpha$ line EW. The present results support and enhance the suggestions that the absence of PBLs in Seyfert 2 galaxies can be explained by larger viewing angle of line of sight to the putative dusty torus, which lead to the obscuration of broad-line scattering screen, as expected by the unification model.
  • We build a large sample of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s) with both optical spectropolarimetric and X-ray data available, in which 29 Sy2s with the detection of polarized broad emission line (PBL) and 25 without. We find that for luminous Sy2s with L_[OIII] > 10^41 erg/s, sources with PBL have smaller X-ray absorption column density comparing with those without PBL (at 92.3% confidence level): most of the Sy2s with N_H<10^23.8 cm^-2 show PBL (86%, 12 out 14), while the fraction is much smaller for sources with heavier obscuration (54%, 15 out 28). The confidence level of the difference in absorption bounces up to 99.1% while using the "T" ratio (F_2-10keV/F_[O III]) as an indicator. We rule out observation or selection bias as the origin for the difference. Our results, for the first time with high statistical confidence, show that, in additional to the nuclei activity, the nuclear obscuration also plays an important role in the visibility of PBL in Sy2s. These results can be interpreted in the framework of the unified model. We can reach these results in the unified model if: a) the absorption column density is higher at large inclinations and b) the scattering region is obscured at large inclinations.