• Magnetic materials hosting topological spin textures like magnetic skyrmion exhibit nontrivial Hall effect, namely, topological Hall effect (THE). In this study, we demonstrate the emergence of THE in thin films of half-metallic perovskite manganites. To stabilize magnetic skyrmions, we control the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by imposing a compressive epitaxial strain as well as by introducing a small Ru doping. When the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is tuned so that it is balanced with the magnetic dipolar interaction, the film exhibits a sizable THE in a magnetization reversal process. Real-space observations indicate the formation of skyrmions and some of them have high topological charge number. The present result opens up the possibility for novel functionalities that emerge under keen competition between the skyrmion phase and other rich phases of perovskite manganites with various orders in spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom.
  • Cross-control of a material property - manipulation of a physical quantity (e.g., magnetisation) by a nonconjugate field (e.g., electrical field) - is a challenge in fundamental science and also important for technological device applications. It has been demonstrated that magnetic properties can be controlled by electrical and optical stimuli in various magnets. Here we find that heat-treatment allows the control over two competing magnetic phases in the Mn-doped polar semiconductor GeTe. The onset temperatures $T_{\rm c}$ of ferromagnetism vary at low Mn concentrations by a factor of five to six with a maximum $T_{\rm c} \approx 180$ K, depending on the selected phase. Analyses in terms of synchrotron x-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy indicate a possible segregation of the Mn ions, which is responsible for the high-$T_{\rm c}$ phase. More importantly, we demonstrate that the two states can be switched back and forth repeatedly from either phase by changing the heat-treatment of a sample, thereby confirming magnetic phase-change- memory functionality.
  • Spontaneously emergent chirality is an issue of fundamental importance across the natural sciences. It has been argued that a unidirectional (chiral) rotation of a mechanical ratchet is forbidden in thermal equilibrium, but becomes possible in systems out of equilibrium. Here we report our finding that a topologically nontrivial spin texture known as a skyrmion - a particle-like object in which spins point in all directions to wrap a sphere - constitutes such a ratchet. By means of Lorentz transmission electron microscopy we show that micron-sized crystals of skyrmions in thin films of Cu2OSeO3 and MnSi display a unidirectional rotation motion. Our numerical simulations based on a stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation suggest that this rotation is driven solely by thermal fluctuations in the presence of a temperature gradient, whereas in thermal equilibrium it is forbidden by the Bohr-van Leeuwen theorem. We show that the rotational flow of magnons driven by the effective magnetic field of skyrmions gives rise to the skyrmion rotation, therefore suggesting that magnons can be used to control the motion of these spin textures.
  • We demonstrate how observations of pulsars can be used to help navigate a spacecraft travelling in the solar system. We make use of archival observations of millisecond pulsars from the Parkes radio telescope in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight issues, such as pulsar spin irregularities, which need to be accounted for. We show that observations of four millisecond pulsars every seven days using a realistic X-ray telescope on the spacecraft throughout a journey from Earth to Mars can lead to position determinations better than approx. 20km and velocity measurements with a precision of approx. 0.1m/s.
  • The chirality, i.e. left or right handedness, is an important notion in a broad range of science. In condensed matter, this occurs not only in molecular or crystal forms but also in magnetic structures. A magnetic skyrmion, a topologically-stable spin vortex structure, as observed in chiral-lattice helimagnets is one such example; the spin swirling direction (skyrmion helicity) should be closely related to the underlying lattice chirality via the relativistic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Here, we report on the correlation between skyrmion helicity and crystal chirality as observed by Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) on the composition-spread alloys of helimagnets Mn1-xFexGe over a broad range (x = 0.3 - 1.0) of the composition. The skyrmion lattice constant or the skyrmion size shows non-monotonous variation with the composition x, accompanying a divergent behavior around x = 0.8, where the correlation between magnetic helicity and crystal chirality is reversed. The underlying mechanism is a continuous x-variation of the SOC strength accompanying sign reversal in the metallic alloys. This may offer a promising way to tune the skyrmion size and helicity.
  • Magneto-transport properties have been investigated for epitaxial thin films of B20-type MnSi grown on Si(111) substrates. Both Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and topological Hall effect (THE) clearly point to the robust formation of skyrmions over a wide temperature-magnetic field region. New features distinct from those of bulk MnSi are observed for epitaxial MnSi films: a shorter (nearly half) period of the spin helix and skyrmions, and an opposite sign of THE. These observations suggest versatile features of skyrmion-induced THE beyond the current understanding.
  • Versatile features of impurity doping effects on perovskite manganites, $R_{0.6}$Sr$_{0.4}$MnO$_{3}$, have been investigated with varying the doing species as well as the $R$-dependent one-electron bandwidth. In ferromagnetic-metallic manganites ($R$=La, Nd, and Sm), a few percent of Fe substitution dramatically decreases the ferromagnetic transition temperature, leading to a spin glass insulating state with short-range charge-orbital correlation. For each $R$ species, the phase diagram as a function of Fe concentration is closely similar to that for $R_{0.6}$Sr$_{0.4}$MnO$_{3}$ obtained by decreasing the ionic radius of $R$ site, indicating that Fe doping in the phase-competing region weakens the ferromagnetic double-exchange interaction, relatively to the charge-orbital ordering instability. We have also found a contrastive impact of Cr (or Ru) doping on a spin-glass insulating manganite ($R$=Gd). There, the impurity-induced ferromagnetic magnetization is observed at low temperatures as a consequence of the collapse of the inherent short-range charge-orbital ordering, while Fe doping plays only a minor role. The observed opposite nature of impurity doping may be attributed to the difference in magnitude of the antiferromagnetic interaction between the doped ions.
  • The relationship between orbital and spin degrees of freedom in the single-crystals of the hole-doped Pr$_{1-x}$Ca$_{1+x}$MnO$_4$, 0.3 $\leq$ $x$ $\leq$ 0.7, has been investigated by means of ac-magnetometry and charge transport. Even though there is no cation ordering on the $A$-site, the quenched disorder is extremely weak in this system due to the very similar ionic size of Pr$^{3+}$ and Ca$^{2+}$. A clear asymmetric response of the system to the under- (respective over-) hole doping was observed. The long-ranged charge-orbital order established for half doping ($x$=0.5) subsists in the over-doping case ($x$ $>$ 0.5), albeit rearranged to accommodate the extra holes introduced in the structure. The charge-orbital order is however destabilized by the presence of extra localized electrons (under-doping, $x$ $<$ 0.5), leading to its disappearance below $x$=0.35. We show that in an intermediate under-doped region, with 0.35 $\leq$ $x$ $<$ 0.5, the ``orbital-master spin-slave'' relationship commonly observed in half-doped manganites does not take place. The long-ranged charge-orbital order is not accompanied by an antiferromagnetic transition at low temperatures, but by a frustrated short-ranged magnetic state bringing forth a spin-glass phase. We discuss in detail the nature and origin of this spin-glass state, which, as in the half-doped manganites with large quenched disorder, is not related to the macroscopic phase separation observed in crystals with minor defects or impurities.
  • Structural features of the charge/orbital ordering (CO/OO) in single-layered manganites Pr1-xCa1+xMnO4 have been investigated systematically by transmission electron microscopy. Analyses of electron diffraction patterns as well as dark-field images have revealed that the CO/OO shows a striking asymmetric behavior as the hole doping x deviates from x = 0.5. The modulation wavenumber linearly decreases with increasing x in the over-hole-doped (x > 0.5) crystals, while much less dependent on x in the under-hole-doped (x < 0.5) crystals. A temperature-induced incommensurate-commensurate crossover is observed in 0.35 < x < 0.5 and x = 0.65. The correlation length of CO/OO in x = 0.3 was proven to become shorter than that in x > 0.3.
  • Phase diagrams in the plane of $r_A$ (the average ionic radius, related to one-electron bandwidth $W$) and $\sigma^2$ (the ionic radius variance, measuring the quenched disorder), or ``bandwidth-disorder phase diagrams'', have been established for perovskite manganites, with three-dimensional (3$D$) Mn-O network. Here we establish the intrinsic bandwidth-disorder phase diagram of half-doped layered manganites with the two-dimensional (2$D$) Mn-O network, examining in detail the ``mother state'' of the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) phenomenon in crystals without ferromagnetic instability. The consequences of the reduced dimensionality, from 3$D$ to 2$D$, on the order-disorder phenomena in the charge-orbital sectors are also highlighted.
  • The electrical, magnetic, and structural properties of Sr$_3$(Ru$_{1-x}$Mn$_x$)$_2$O$_7$ (0 $\leq x \leq$ 0.2) are investigated. The parent compound Sr$_3$Ru$_2$O$_7$ is a paramagnetic metal, critically close to magnetic order. We have found that, with a Ru-site doping by only a few percent of Mn, the ground state is switched from a paramagnetic metal to an antiferromagnetic insulator. Optical conductivity measurements show the opening of a gap as large as 0.1 eV, indicating that the metal-to-insulator transition is driven by the electron correlation. The complex low-temperature antiferromagnetic spin arrangement, reminiscent of those observed in some nickelates and manganites, suggests a long range orbital order.