• To date, PMN J2134-0419 (at a redshift z=4.33) is the second most distant quasar known with a milliarcsecond-scale morphology permitting direct estimates of the jet proper motion. Based on two-epoch observations, we constrained its radio jet proper motion using the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) technique. The observations were conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz on 1999 November 26 and 2015 October 6. We imaged the central 10-pc scale radio jet emission and modeled its brightness distribution. By identifying a jet component at both epochs separated by 15.86 yr, a proper motion of mu=0.035 +- 0.023 mas/yr is found. It corresponds to an apparent superluminal speed of beta_a=4.1 +- 2.7 c . Relativistic beaming at both epochs suggests that the jet viewing angle with respect to the line of sight is smaller than 20 deg, with a minimum bulk Lorentz factor Gamma=4.3. The small value of the proper motion is in good agreement with the expectations from the cosmological interpretation of the redshift and the current cosmological model. Additionally we analyzed archival Very Large Array observations of J2143-0419 and found indication of a bent jet extending to ~30 kpc.
  • Radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), hosting powerful relativistic jet outflows, provide an excellent laboratory for studying jet physics. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) enables high-resolution imaging on milli-arcsecond (mas) and sub-mas scales, making it a powerful tool to explore the inner jet structure, shedding light on the formation, acceleration and collimation of AGN jets. In this paper, we present Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of ten radio-loud AGNs at 43 and 86~GHz, which were selected from the {\it Planck} catalogue of compact sources and are among the brightest in published VLBI images at and below 15 GHz. The image noise levels in our observations are typically 0.3 mJy beam$^{-1}$ and 1.5 mJy beam$^{-1}$ at 43 and 86 GHz, respectively. Compared with the VLBI data observed at lower frequencies from the literature, our observations with higher resolution (the highest resolution up to 0.07 mas at 86 GHz and 0.18 mas at 43 GHz) and at higher frequencies detected new jet components at sub-parsec scales, offering valuable data for studies of the physical properties of innermost jets. These include compactness factor of the radio structure (the ratio of core flux density to total flux density), and core brightness temperature ($T_{\rm b}$). In all these sources, the compact core accounts for a significant fraction ($> 60\%$) of the total flux density. Their correlated flux density at the longest baselines is higher than 0.16 Jy. The compactness of these sources make them good phase calibrators of mm-wavelength ground-based and space VLBI.
  • Blazars are active galactic nuclei (AGN) whose relativistic jets point nearly to the line of sight. Their compact radio structure can be imaged with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) on parsec scales. Blazars at extremely high redshifts provide a unique insight into the AGN phenomena in the early Universe. We observed four radio sources at redshift $z>4$ with the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.7 and 5 GHz. These objects were previously classified as blazar candidates based on X-ray observations. One of them, J2134$-$0419 is firmly confirmed as a blazar with our VLBI observations, due to its relativistically beamed radio emission. Its radio jet extended to $\sim$10 milli-arcsec scale makes this source a promising target for follow-up VLBI observations to reveal any apparent proper motion. Another target, J0839+5112 shows a compact radio structure typical of quasars. There is evidence for flux density variability and its radio "core" has a flat spectrum. However, the EVN data suggest that its emission is not Doppler-boosted. The remaining two blazar candidates (J1420+1205 and J2220+0025) show radio properties totally unexpected from radio AGN with small-inclination jet. Their emission extends to arcsec scales and the Doppler factors of the central components are well below 1. Their structures resemble that of double-lobed radio AGN with large inclination to the line of sight. This is in contrast with the blazar-type modeling of their multi-band spectral energy distributions. Our work underlines the importance of high-resolution VLBI imaging in confirming the blazar nature of high-redshift radio sources.
  • According to hierarchical structure formation models, merging galaxies are expected to be seen in different stages of their coalescence. However, currently there are no straightforward observational methods neither to select nor to confirm a large number of dual active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates. Most attempts involve the better understanding of double-peaked narrow emission line sources, to distinguish the objects where the emission lines originate from narrow-line kinematics or jet-driven outflows from those which might harbour dual AGN. We observed four such candidate sources with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 1.5 GHz with $\sim$ 10 milli-arcsecond angular resolution where spectral profiles of AGN optical emission suggested the existence of dual AGN. In SDSS J210449.13-000919.1 and SDSS J23044.82-093345.3, the radio structures are aligned with the optical emission features, thus the double-peaked emission lines might be the results of jet-driven outflows. In the third detected source SDSS J115523.74+150756.9, the radio structure is less extended and oriented nearly perpendicular to the position angle derived from optical spectroscopy. The fourth source remained undetected with the VLBA but it has been imaged with the Very Large Array at arcsec resolution a few months before our observations, suggesting the existence of extended radio structure. In none of the four sources did we detect two radio-emitting cores, a convincing signature of duality.
  • A patch of sky in the SDSS Stripe 82 was observed at 1.6 GHz with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) using the European VLBI Network (EVN). The data were correlated at the EVN software correlator at JIVE (SFXC). There are fifteen known mJy/sub-mJy radio sources in the target field defined by the primary beam size of a typical 30-m class EVN radio telescope. The source of particular interest is a recently identified high-redshift radio quasar J222843.54+011032.2 (J2228+0110) at redshift z=5.95. Our aim was to investigate the milli-arcsecond (mas) scale properties of all the VLBI-detectable sources within this primary beam area with a diameter of 20 arcmin. The source J2228+0110 was detected with VLBI with a brightness temperature T_b>10^8 K, supporting the active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin of its radio emission, which is conclusive evidence that the source is a radio quasar. In addition, two other target sources were also detected, one of them with no redshift information. Their brightness temperature values (T_b >10^7 K) measured with VLBI suggest a non-thermal synchrotron radiation origin for their radio emission. The detection rate of 20% is broadly consistent with other wide-field VLBI experiments carried out recently. We also derived the accurate equatorial coordinates of the three detected sources using the phase-referencing technique. This experiment is an early attempt of a wide-field science project with SFXC, paving the way for the EVN to conduct a large-scale VLBI survey in the multiple-phase-centre mode.
  • The galaxy 3C\,316 is the brightest in the radio band among the optically-selected candidates exhibiting double-peaked narrow optical emission lines. Observations with the Very Large Array (VLA), Multi-Element Remotely Linked Interferometer Network (e-MERLIN), and the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5\,GHz have been used to study the radio structure of the source in order to determine the nature of the nuclear components and to determine the presence of radio cores. The e-MERLIN image of 3C 316 reveals a collimated coherent east-west emission structure with a total extent of about 3 kpc. The EVN image shows seven discrete compact knots on an S-shaped line. However, none of these knots could be unambiguously identified as an AGN core. The observations suggest that the majority of the radio structure belongs to a powerful radio AGN, whose physical size and radio spectrum classify it as a compact steep-spectrum source. Given the complex radio structure with radio blobs and knots, the possibility of a kpc-separation dual AGN cannot be excluded if the secondary is either a naked core or radio quiet.
  • High precision astrometric Space Very Long Baseline Interferometry (S-VLBI) at the low end of the conventional frequency range, i.e. 20cm, is a requirement for a number of high priority science goals. These are headlined by obtaining trigonometric parallax distances to pulsars in Pulsar--Black Hole pairs and OH masers anywhere in the Milky Way Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. We propose a solution for the most difficult technical problems in S-VLBI by the MultiView approach where multiple sources, separated by several degrees on the sky, are observed simultaneously. We simulated a number of challenging S-VLBI configurations, with orbit errors up to 8m in size and with ionospheric atmospheres consistant with poor conditions. In these simulations we performed MultiView analysis to achieve the required science goals. This approach removes the need for beam switching requiring a Control Moment Gyro, and the space and ground infrastructure required for high quality orbit reconstruction of a space-based radio telescope. This will dramatically reduce the complexity of S-VLBI missions which implement the phase-referencing technique.
  • 1156+295 is a flat-spectrum quasar which is loud at radio and gamma-ray. Previous observations of the source revealed a radio morphology on pc to kpc scales consistent with a helical jet model. In our present research, this source was observed with the VLBA at 86, 43 and 15 GHz on four epochs from 10 May 2003 to 13 March 2005 aiming at studying the structure of the innermost jet in order to understand the relation between the helical structure and the astrophysical processes in the central engine. A core-jet structure with six jet components is identified. The apparent transverse velocities of the six jet components derived from proper motion measurements are in the range between 3.6 c and 11.6 c. The overall jet shape shows oscillatory morphology with multiple curvatures on pc scales which might be indicative of a helical pattern. Models of helical jet are discussed on the basis of both Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability and jet precession. The K-H instability model shows better agreement with the observed data. The overall radio structure on the scale from sub-pc to kpc appears to be fitted with a hydrodynamic model with the fundamental helical mode in Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability. This helical mode with an initial characteristic wavelength of 0.2 pc is excited at the base of the jet on the scale of 0.005 pc (or 1000R_s, the typical size of the broad line region for a super massive black hole of $4.3\times10^8M_{\odot}$). A presessing jet model can also fit the observed jet structure on the scale between 10 pc and 300 pc. However, additional astrophysical processes may be required for the presessing jet model in order to explain the bendings on the inner jet structure (1 to 10 pc) and re-collimation of the large scale jet outflow (>300 pc).
  • We investigate the frequency-dependent radio properties of the jet of the luminous high-redshift (z = 3.2) radio quasar PKS 1402+044 (J1405+0415) by means of radio interferometric observations. The observational data were obtained with the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) at 1.6 and 5 GHz, supplemented by other multi-frequency observations with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA; 2.3, 8.4, and 15 GHz) and the Very Large Array (VLA; 1.4, 5, 15, and 43 GHz). The observations span a period of 7 years. We find that the luminous high-redshift quasar PKS 1402+044 has a pronounced "core-jet" morphology from the parsec to the kilo-parsec scales. The jet shows a steeper spectral index and lower brightness temperature with increasing distance from the jet core. The variation of brightness temperature agrees well with the shock-in-jet model. Assuming that the jet is collimated by the ambient magnetic field, we estimate the mass of the central object as ~10^9 M_sun. The upper limit of the jet proper motion of PKS 1402+044 is 0.03 mas/yr (~3c) in the east-west direction.