• An electric method for measuring magnetic anisotropy in antiferromagnetic insulators (AFIs) is proposed. When a metallic film with strong spin-orbit interactions, e.g., platinum (Pt), is deposited on an AFI, its resistance should be affected by the direction of the AFI N eel vector due to the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR). Accordingly, the direction of the AFI N eel vector, which is affected by both the external magnetic field and the magnetic anisotropy, is reflected in resistance of Pt. The magnetic field angle dependence of the resistance of Pt on AFI is calculated by consider- ing the SMR, which indicates that the antiferromagnetic anisotropy can be obtained experimentally by monitoring the Pt resistance in strong magnetic fields. Calculations are performed for realistic systems such as Pt/Cr2O3, Pt/NiO, and Pt/CoO.
  • Superconductivity that spontaneously breaks time-reversal symmetry (TRS) has been found, so far, only in a handful of 3D crystals with bulk inversion symmetry. Here we report an observation of spontaneous TRS breaking in a 2D superconducting system without inversion symmetry: the epitaxial bilayer films of bismuth and nickel. The evidence comes from the onset of the polar Kerr effect at the superconducting transition in the absence of an external magnetic field, detected by the ultrasensitive loop-less fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer. Because of strong spin-orbit interaction and lack of inversion symmetry in a Bi/Ni bilayer, superconducting pairing cannot be classified as singlet or triplet. We propose a theoretical model where magnetic fluctuations in Ni induce superconducting pairing of the dxy = +- idx^2y^2 orbital symmetry between the electrons in Bi. In this model the order parameter spontaneously breaks the TRS and has a non-zero phase winding number around the Fermi surface, thus making it a rare example of a 2D topological superconductor.
  • There have been continuous efforts in searching for unconventional superconductivity over the past five decades. Compared to the well-established d-wave superconductivity in cuprates, the existence of superconductivity with other high-angular-momentum pairing symmetries is less conclusive. Bi/Ni epitaxial bilayer is a potential unconventional superconductor with broken time reversal symmetry (TRS), for that it demonstrates superconductivity and ferromagnetism simultaneously at low temperatures. We employ a specially designed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect, on the Bi/Ni bilayer, the orbital magnetic moment which is expected if the TRS is broken. An anomalous hysteretic magnetic response has been observed in the superconducting state, providing the evidence for the existence of chiral superconducting domains in the material.
  • Superconductivity (SC) is one of the most intriguing physical phenomena in nature. Nucleation of SC has long been considered highly unfavorable if not impossible near ferromagnetism, in low dimensionality and, above all, out of non-superconductor. Here we report observation of SC with TC near 4 K in Ni/Bi bilayers that defies all known paradigms of superconductivity, where neither ferromagnetic Ni film nor rhombohedra Bi film is superconducting in isolation. This highly unusual SC is independent of the growth order (Ni/Bi or Bi/Ni), but highly sensitive to the constituent layer thicknesses. Most importantly, the SC, distinctively non-s pairing, is triggered from, but does not occur at, the Bi/Ni interface. Using point contact Andreev reflection, we show evidences that the unique SC, naturally compatible with magnetism, is triplet p-wave pairing. This new revelation may lead to unconventional avenues to explore novel SC for applications in superconducting spintronics.
  • We derive a general scaling relation for the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic metals involving multiple competing scattering mechanisms, described by a quadratic hypersurface in the space spanned by the partial resistivities. We also present experimental findings, which show strong deviation from previously found scaling forms when different scattering mechanism compete in strength but can be nicely explained by our theory.
  • Valley pseudospin, the quantum degree of freedom characterizing the degenerate valleys in energy bands, is a distinct feature of two-dimensional Dirac materials. Similar to spin, the valley pseudospin is spanned by a time reversal pair of states, though the two valley pseudospin states transform to each other under spatial inversion. The breaking of inversion symmetry induces various valley-contrasted physical properties; for instance, valley-dependent topological transport is of both scientific and technological interests. Bilayer graphene (BLG) is a unique system whose intrinsic inversion symmetry can be controllably broken by a perpendicular electric field, offering a rare possibility for continuously tunable valley-topological transport. Here, we used a perpendicular gate electric field to break the inversion symmetry in BLG, and a giant nonlocal response was observed as a result of the topological transport of the valley pseudospin. We further showed that the valley transport is fully tunable by external gates, and that the nonlocal signal persists up to room temperature and over long distances. These observations challenge contemporary understanding of topological transport in a gapped system, and the robust topological transport may lead to future valleytronic applications.
  • Persistent confusion has existed between the intrinsic (Berry curvature) and the side jump mechanisms of anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferromagnets. We provide unambiguous identification of the side jump mechanism, in addition to the skew scattering contribution in epitaxial paramagnetic Ni$_{34}$Cu$_{66}$ thin films, in which the intrinsic contribution is by definition excluded. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the AHE further reveals that the side jump mechanism is dominated by the elastic scattering.
  • Quantum transport measurements including the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effects, universal conductance fluctuations (UCF), and weak anti-localization (WAL) have been carried out on epitaxial Bi thin films ($10-70$ bilayers) on Si(111). The results show that while the film interior is insulating all six surfaces of the Bi thin films are robustly metallic. We propose that these properties are the manifestation of a novel phenomenon, namely, a topologically trivial bulk system can become topologically non-trivial when it is made into a thin film. We stress that what's observed here is entirely different from the predicted 2D topological insulating state in a single bilayer Bi where only the four side surfaces should possess topologically protected gapless states.
  • The electrical conductance of molecular beam epitaxial Bi on BaF2(111) was measured as a function of both film thickness (4-540 nm) and temperature (5-300 K). Unlike bulk Bi as a prototype semimetal, the Bi thin films up to 90 nm are found to be insulating in the interiors but metallic on the surfaces. This result has not only resolved unambiguously the long controversy about the existence of semimetal-semiconductor transition in Bi thin film but also provided a straightforward interpretation for the long-puzzled temperature dependence of the resistivity of Bi thin films, which in turn might suggest some potential applications in spintronics.
  • We investigate the unusual temperature dependence of the anomalous Hall effect in Ni. By varying the thickness of the MBE-grown Ni films, the longitudinal resistivity is uniquely tuned without resorting to doping impurities; consequently, the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions are cleanly separated out. In stark contrast to other ferromagnets such as Fe, the intrinsic contribution in Ni is found to be strongly temperature dependent with a value of 1100 (ohm*cm)^(-1) at low temperatures and 500 (ohm*cm)^(-1) at high temperatures. This pronounced temperature dependence, a cause of long-standing confusion concerning the physical origin of the AHE, is likely due to the small energy level splitting caused by the spin orbit coupling close to the Fermi surface. Our result helps pave the way for the general claim of the Berry-phase interpretation for the AHE.
  • Working with epitaxial films of Fe, we succeeded in independent control of different scattering processes in the anomalous Hall effect. The result appropriately accounted for the role of phonons, thereby clearly exposing the fundamental flaws of the standard plot of the anomalous Hall resistivity versus longitudinal resistivity. A new scaling has been thus established that allows an unambiguous identification of the intrinsic Berry curvature mechanism as well as the extrinsic skew scattering and side-jump mechanisms of the anomalous Hall effect.
  • Continuing the arguments in Paper I (arXiv: cond-mat/0405487), we model the temperature dependence of interstitial defects in a surface-free face-centered-cubic (fcc) elemental crystal and obtain the free energy and correlation behavior based on variational methods. We show that the avalanche of interstitial defects is the instability mechanism at the melting point that bridges Lindemann and Born criteria.
  • We investigate theoretically the crucial r\^{o}le of interstitialcies that trigger the melting of a boundary-free crystal. Based on an interstitialcy model that resembles the $J_1$-$J_2$ model of frustrated antiferromagnets with uniaxial anisotropy, we have calculated the exact partition function and correlation functions in a one-dimensional atom chain. The melting point and correlation behavior of this crystal model show the applicability of Lindemann criterion and Born criterion in the one-dimensional case.