• We present measurements of the anisotropic galaxy clustering from the Data Release 9 (DR9) CMASS sample of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We analyze the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions to obtain constraints, at the effective redshift $z=0.57$ of the sample, on the Hubble expansion rate $H(z)$, the angular-diameter distance $D_A(z)$, the normalized growth rate $f(z)\sigma_8(z)$, the physical matter density $\Omega_m h^2$, and the biased amplitude of matter fluctuation b\sigma_8(z). We obtain {$H(0.57)$, $D_A(0.57)$, $f(0.57)\sigma_8(0.57)$, $\Omega_m h^2$, $b\sigma_8(0.57)$} = {$87.6_{-6.8}^{+6.7}$, $1396\pm73$, $0.126_{-0.010}^{+0.008}$, $1.19\pm0.14$, $0.428\pm0.066$} and their covariance matrix as well. The parameters which are not well constrained by our of galaxy clustering analysis are marginalized over with wide flat priors. Since no priors from other data sets (i.e., CMB) are adopted and no dark energy models are assumed, our results from BOSS CMASS galaxy clustering alone may be combined with other data sets, i.e. CMB, SNe, lensing or other galaxy clustering data to constrain the parameters of a given cosmological model. We show that the major power on constraining dark energy from the anisotropic galaxy clustering signal, as compared to the angular-averaged one (monopole), arises from including the normalized growth rate $f(z)\sigma_8(z)$. In the case of the wCDM cosmological model our single-probe CMASS constraints, combined with CMB (WMAP9+SPT), yield a value for the dark energy equation of state parameter of $w=-0.90\pm0.11$. Therefore, it is important to include $f(z)\sigma_8(z)$ while investigating the nature of dark energy with current and upcoming large-scale galaxy surveys.
  • We introduce the concept of optical control of the fluorescence yield of CdSe quantum dots through plasmon-induced structural changes in random semicontinuous nanostructured gold films. We demonstrate that the wavelength- and polarization dependent coupling between quantum dots and the semicontinuous films, and thus the fluorescent emission spectrum, can be controlled and significantly increased through the optical extinction of a selective band of eigenmodes in the films. This optical method of effecting controlled changes in the metal nanostructure allows for versatile functionality in a single sample and opens a pathway to in situ control over the fluorescence spectrum.
  • We present a one per cent measurement of the cosmic distance scale from the detections of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the clustering of galaxies from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). Our results come from the Data Release 11 (DR11) sample, containing nearly one million galaxies and covering approximately $8\,500$ square degrees and the redshift range $0.2<z<0.7$. We also compare these results with those from the publicly released DR9 and DR10 samples. Assuming a concordance $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model, the DR11 sample covers a volume of 13\,Gpc${}^3$ and is the largest region of the Universe ever surveyed at this density. We measure the correlation function and power spectrum, including density-field reconstruction of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature. The acoustic features are detected at a significance of over $7\,\sigma$ in both the correlation function and power spectrum. Fitting for the position of the acoustic features measures the distance relative to the sound horizon at the drag epoch, $r_d$, which has a value of $r_{d,{\rm fid}}=149.28\,$Mpc in our fiducial cosmology. We find $D_V=(1264\pm25\,{\rm Mpc})(r_d/r_{d,{\rm fid}})$ at $z=0.32$ and $D_V=(2056\pm20\,{\rm Mpc})(r_d/r_{d,{\rm fid}})$ at $z=0.57$. At 1.0 per cent, this latter measure is the most precise distance constraint ever obtained from a galaxy survey. Separating the clustering along and transverse to the line-of-sight yields measurements at $z=0.57$ of $D_A=(1421\pm20\,{\rm Mpc})(r_d/r_{d,{\rm fid}})$ and $H=(96.8\pm3.4\,{\rm km/s/Mpc})(r_{d,{\rm fid}}/r_d)$. Our measurements of the distance scale are in good agreement with previous BAO measurements and with the predictions from cosmic microwave background data for a spatially flat cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant.
  • Extraction of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) to percent level accuracy is challenging and demands an understanding of many potential systematic to an accuracy well below 1 per cent, in order ensure that they do not combine significantly when compared to statistical error of the BAO measurement. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) SDSS Data Release Eleven (DR11) reaches a distance measurement with $\sim 1\%$ statistical error and this prompts an extensive search for all possible sub-percent level systematic errors which could be safely ignored previously. In this paper, we analyze the potential systematics in BAO fitting methodology using mocks and data from BOSS DR10 and DR11. We demonstrate the robustness of the fiducial multipole fitting methodology to be at $0.1\%-0.2\%$ level with a wide range of tests in mock galaxy catalogs pre- and post-reconstruction. We also find the DR10 and DR11 data from BOSS to be robust against changes in methodology at similar level. This systematic error budget is incorporated into the the error budget of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR10 and DR11 BAO measurements. Of the wide range of changes we have investigated, we find that when fitting pre-reconstructed data or mocks, the following changes have the largest effect on the best fit values of distance measurements both parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight: (a) Changes in non-linear correlation function template; (b) Changes in fitting range of the correlation function; (c) Changes to the non-linear damping model parameters. The priors applied do not matter in the estimates of the fitted errors as long as we restrict ourselves to physically meaningful fitting regions.[abridged]
  • We present measurements of the angular diameter distance to and Hubble parameter at z=0.57 from the measurement of the baryon acoustic peak in the correlation of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our analysis is based on a sample from Data Release 9 of 264,283 galaxies over 3275 square degrees in the redshift range 0.43<z<0.70. We use two different methods to provide robust measurement of the acoustic peak position across and along the line of sight in order to measure the cosmological distance scale. We find D_A(0.57) = 1408 +/- 45 Mpc and H(0.57) = 92.9 +/- 7.8 km/s/Mpc for our fiducial value of the sound horizon. These results from the anisotropic fitting are fully consistent with the analysis of the spherically averaged acoustic peak position presented in Anderson et al, 2012. Our distance measurements are a close match to the predictions of the standard cosmological model featuring a cosmological constant and zero spatial curvature.
  • We analyze the 2D correlation function of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS sample of massive galaxies of the ninth data release to measure cosmic expansion H and the angular diameter distance D_A at a mean redshift of <z> = 0.57. We apply, for the first time, a new correlation function technique called clustering wedges. Using a physically motivated model, the anisotropic baryonic acoustic feature in the galaxy sample is detected at a significance level of 4.7 sigma compared to a featureless model. The baryonic acoustic feature is used to obtain model independent constraints cz/H/r_s = 12.28 +- 0.82 (6.7 per-cent accuracy) and D_A/r_s = 9.05 +- 0.27 (3.0 per-cent) with a correlation coefficient of -0.5, where r_s is the sound horizon scale at the end of the baryonic drag era. We conduct thorough tests on the data and 600 simulated realizations, finding robustness of the results regardless of the details of the analysis method. Combining with r_s constraints from the Cosmic Microwave Background we obtain H(0.57) = 90.8 +- 6.2 kms-1Mpc-1 and D_A(0.57) = 1386 +- 45 Mpc. We use simulations to forecast results of the final BOSS CMASS data set. We apply the reconstruction technique on the simulations demonstrating that the sharpening of the anisotropic baryonic acoustic feature should improve the detection as well as tighten constraints of H and D_A by 30 per-cent on average.
  • We explore the cosmological implications of the clustering wedges, xi_perp(s) and xi_para(s), of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). These clustering wedges are defined by averaging the full two-dimensional correlation function, xi(mu,s), over the ranges 0<mu<0.5 and 0.5<mu<1, respectively. These measurements allow us to constrain the parameter combinations D_A(z)/r_s(z_d)=9.03 +- 0.21 and cz/(r_s(z_d)H(z)) = 12.14 +- 0.43 at the mean redsfhit of the sample, z=0.57. We combine the information from the clustering wedges with recent measurements of CMB, BAO and type Ia supernovae to obtain constraints on the cosmological parameters of the standard LCDM model and a number of potential extensions. The information encoded in the clustering wedges is most useful when the dark energy equation of state is allowed to deviate from its standard LCDM value. The combination of all datasets shows no evidence of a deviation from a constant dark energy equation of state, in which case we find w_DE = -1.013 +- 0.064, in complete agreement with a cosmological constant. We explore potential deviations from general relativity by constraining the growth rate f(z)=d ln D(a)/ d ln a, in which case the combination of the CMASS clustering wedges with CMB data implies f(z=0.57)=0.719 +- 0.094, in accordance with the predictions of GR. Our results clearly illustrate the additional constraining power of anisotropic clustering measurements with respect to that of angle-averaged quantities.
  • We investigate machine learning (ML) techniques for predicting the number of galaxies (N_gal) that occupy a halo, given the halo's properties. These types of mappings are crucial for constructing the mock galaxy catalogs necessary for analyses of large-scale structure. The ML techniques proposed here distinguish themselves from traditional halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling as they do not assume a prescribed relationship between halo properties and N_gal. In addition, our ML approaches are only dependent on parent halo properties (like HOD methods), which are advantageous over subhalo-based approaches as identifying subhalos correctly is difficult. We test 2 algorithms: support vector machines (SVM) and k-nearest-neighbour (kNN) regression. We take galaxies and halos from the Millennium simulation and predict N_gal by training our algorithms on the following 6 halo properties: number of particles, M_200, \sigma_v, v_max, half-mass radius and spin. For Millennium, our predicted N_gal values have a mean-squared-error (MSE) of ~0.16 for both SVM and kNN. Our predictions match the overall distribution of halos reasonably well and the galaxy correlation function at large scales to ~5-10%. In addition, we demonstrate a feature selection algorithm to isolate the halo parameters that are most predictive, a useful technique for understanding the mapping between halo properties and N_gal. Lastly, we investigate these ML-based approaches in making mock catalogs for different galaxy subpopulations (e.g. blue, red, high M_star, low M_star). Given its non-parametric nature as well as its powerful predictive and feature selection capabilities, machine learning offers an interesting alternative for creating mock catalogs.
  • We present measurements of the angular diameter distance D_A(z) and the Hubble parameter H(z) at z=0.35 using the anisotropy of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal measured in the galaxy clustering distribution of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) sample. Our work is the first to apply density-field reconstruction to an anisotropic analysis of the acoustic peak. Reconstruction partially removes the effects of non-linear evolution and redshift-space distortions in order to sharpen the acoustic signal. We present the theoretical framework behind the anisotropic BAO signal and give a detailed account of the fitting model we use to extract this signal from the data. Our method focuses only on the acoustic peak anisotropy, rather than the more model-dependent anisotropic information from the broadband power. We test the robustness of our analysis methods on 160 LasDamas DR7 mock catalogues and find that our models are unbiased at the ~0.2% level in measuring the BAO anisotropy. After reconstruction we measure D_A(z=0.35)=1050+/-38 Mpc and H(z=0.35)=84.4+/-7.0 km/s/Mpc assuming a sound horizon of r_s=152.76 Mpc. Note that these measurements are correlated with a correlation coefficient of 0.58. This represents a factor of 1.4 improvement in the error on D_A relative to the pre-reconstruction case; a factor of 1.2 improvement is seen for H.
  • Hexagonal LuFeO$_3$ films have been studied using x-ray absorption and optical spectroscopy. The crystal splittings of Fe$^{3+}$ are extracted as $E_{e'}-E_{e"}$=0.7 eV and $E_{a_1'}-E_{e'}$=0.9 eV and a 2.0 eV optical band gap is determined assuming a direct gap. First-principles calculations confirm the experiments that the relative energies of crystal field splitting states do follow $E_{a_1'}>E_{e'}>E_{e"}$ with slightly underestimated values and a band gap of 1.35 eV.
  • We analyze the density field of galaxies observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) included in the SDSS Data Release Nine (DR9). DR9 includes spectroscopic redshifts for over 400,000 galaxies spread over a footprint of 3,275 deg^2. We identify, characterize, and mitigate the impact of sources of systematic uncertainty on large-scale clustering measurements, both for angular moments of the redshift-space correlation function and the spherically averaged power spectrum, P(k), in order to ensure that robust cosmological constraints will be obtained from these data. A correlation between the projected density of stars and the higher redshift (0.43 < z < 0.7) galaxy sample (the `CMASS' sample) due to imaging systematics imparts a systematic error that is larger than the statistical error of the clustering measurements at scales s > 120h^-1Mpc or k < 0.01hMpc^-1. We find that these errors can be ameliorated by weighting galaxies based on their surface brightness and the local stellar density. We use mock galaxy catalogs that simulate the CMASS selection function to determine that randomly selecting galaxy redshifts in order to simulate the radial selection function of a random sample imparts the least systematic error on correlation function measurements and that this systematic error is negligible for the spherically averaged correlation function. The methods we recommend for the calculation of clustering measurements using the CMASS sample are adopted in companion papers that locate the position of the baryon acoustic oscillation feature (Anderson et al. 2012), constrain cosmological models using the full shape of the correlation function (Sanchez et al. 2012), and measure the rate of structure growth (Reid et al. 2012). (abridged)
  • We present a fast method of producing mock galaxy catalogues that can be used to compute covariance matrices of large-scale clustering measurements and test the methods of analysis. Our method populates a 2nd-order Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (2LPT) matter field, where we calibrate masses of dark matter halos by detailed comparisons with N-body simulations. We demonstrate the clustering of halos is recovered at ~10 per cent accuracy. We populate halos with mock galaxies using a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) prescription, which has been calibrated to reproduce the clustering measurements on scales between 30 and 80 Mpc/h. We compare the sample covariance matrix from our mocks with analytic estimates, and discuss differences. We have used this method to make catalogues corresponding to Data Release 9 of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS),producing 600 mock catalogues of the "CMASS" galaxy sample. These mocks enabled detailed tests of methods and errors that formed an integral part of companion analyses of these galaxy data.
  • March 29, 2012 astro-ph.CO
    We present measurements of galaxy clustering from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). These use the Data Release 9 (DR9) CMASS sample, which contains 264,283 massive galaxies covering 3275 square degrees with an effective redshift z=0.57 and redshift range 0.43 < z < 0.7. Assuming a concordance Lambda-CDM cosmological model, this sample covers an effective volume of 2.2 Gpc^3, and represents the largest sample of the Universe ever surveyed at this density, n = 3 x 10^-4 h^-3 Mpc^3. We measure the angle-averaged galaxy correlation function and power spectrum, including density-field reconstruction of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature. The acoustic features are detected at a significance of 5\sigma in both the correlation function and power spectrum. Combining with the SDSS-II Luminous Red Galaxy Sample, the detection significance increases to 6.7\sigma. Fitting for the position of the acoustic features measures the distance to z=0.57 relative to the sound horizon DV /rs = 13.67 +/- 0.22 at z=0.57. Assuming a fiducial sound horizon of 153.19 Mpc, which matches cosmic microwave background constraints, this corresponds to a distance DV(z=0.57) = 2094 +/- 34 Mpc. At 1.7 per cent, this is the most precise distance constraint ever obtained from a galaxy survey. We place this result alongside previous BAO measurements in a cosmological distance ladder and find excellent agreement with the current supernova measurements. We use these distance measurements to constrain various cosmological models, finding continuing support for a flat Universe with a cosmological constant.
  • We use the 2% distance measurement from our reconstructed baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) signature using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from Padmanabhan et al. (2012) and Xu et al. (2012) combined with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) to measure parameters for various cosmological models. We find a 1.7% measurement of H_0 = 69.8 +/- 1.2 km/s/Mpc and a 5.0% measurement of Omega_m = 0.280 +/- 0.014 for a flat Universe with a cosmological constant. These measurements of H_0 and Omega_m are robust against a range of underlying models for the expansion history. We measure the dark energy equation of state parameter w = -0.97 +/- 0.17, which is consistent with a cosmological constant. If curvature is allowed to vary, we find that the Universe is consistent with a flat geometry (Omega_K = -0.004 +/- 0.005). We also use a combination of the 6 Degree Field Galaxy Survey BAO data, WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey data, Type Ia supernovae (SN) data, and a local measurement of the Hubble constant to explore cosmological models with more parameters. Finally, we explore the effect of varying the energy density of relativistic particles on the measurement of H_0.
  • We present results from fitting the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal in the correlation function obtained from the first application of reconstruction to a galaxy redshift survey, namely, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7) luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogue. We also introduce more careful approaches for deriving a suitable covariance matrix and fitting model for galaxy correlation functions. These all aid in obtaining a more accurate measurement of the acoustic scale and its error. We validate our reconstruction, covariance matrix and fitting techniques on 160 mock catalogues derived from the LasDamas simulations in real and redshift space. We then apply these techniques to the DR7 LRG sample and find that the error on the acoustic scale decreases from ~3.5% before reconstruction to ~1.9% after reconstruction. This factor of 1.8 reduction in the error is equivalent to the effect of tripling the survey volume. We also see an increase in our BAO detection confidence from ~3-sigma to ~4-sigma after reconstruction with our confidence level in measuring the correct acoustic scale increasing from ~3-sigma to ~5-sigma. Using the mean of the acoustic scale probability distributions produced from our fits, we find D_v/r_s = 8.89 +/- 0.31 before reconstruction and 8.88 +/- 0.17 after reconstruction.
  • We apply the reconstruction technique to the clustering of galaxies from the SDSS DR7 LRG sample, sharpening the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature and achieving a 1.9% measurement of the distance to z=0.35. This is the first application of reconstruction of the BAO feature in a galaxy redshift survey. We update the reconstruction algorithm of Eisenstein et al, 2007 to account for the effects of survey geometry as well as redshift-space distortions and validate it on 160 LasDamas simulations. We demonstrate that reconstruction sharpens the BAO feature in the angle averaged galaxy correlation function, reducing the nonlinear smoothing scale \Sigma_nl from 8.1 Mpc/h to 4.4 Mpc/h. Reconstruction also significantly reduces the effects of redshift-space distortions at the BAO scale, isotropizing the correlation function. This sharpened BAO feature yields an unbiased distance estimate (< 0.2%) and reduces the scatter from 3.3% to 2.1%. We demonstrate the robustness of these results to the various reconstruction parameters, including the smoothing scale, the galaxy bias and the linear growth rate. Applying this reconstruction algorithm to the SDSS LRG DR7 sample improves the significance of the BAO feature in these data from 3.3 sigma for the unreconstructed correlation function, to 4.2 sigma after reconstruction. We estimate a relative distance scale D_V/r_s to z=0.35 of 8.88+/-0.17, where r_s is the sound horizon and D_V = (D_A^2/H)^{1/3} is a combination of the angular diameter distance D_A and Hubble parameter H. Assuming a sound horizon of 154.25 Mpc, this translates into a distance measurement D_V (z=0.35) = 1.356+/-0.025 Gpc. We find that reconstruction reduces the distance error in the DR7 sample from 3.5% to 1.9%, equivalent to a survey with three times the volume of SDSS.
  • We measure the acoustic scale from the angular power spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) Data Release 8 imaging catalog that includes 872,921 galaxies over ~ 10,000 deg^2 between 0.45<z<0.65. The extensive spectroscopic training set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) luminous galaxies allows precise estimates of the true redshift distributions of galaxies in our imaging catalog. Utilizing the redshift distribution information, we build templates and fit to the power spectra of the data, which are measured in our companion paper, Ho et al. 2011, to derive the location of Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) while marginalizing over many free parameters to exclude nearly all of the non-BAO signal. We derive the ratio of the angular diameter distance to the sound horizon scale D_A/r_s= 9.212 + 0.416 -0.404 at z=0.54, and therefore, D_A= 1411+- 65 Mpc at z=0.54; the result is fairly independent of assumptions on the underlying cosmology. Our measurement of angular diameter distance D_A is 1.4 \sigma higher than what is expected for the concordance LCDM (Komatsu et al. 2011), in accordance to the trend of other spectroscopic BAO measurements for z >~ 0.35. We report constraints on cosmological parameters from our measurement in combination with the WMAP7 data and the previous spectroscopic BAO measurements of SDSS (Percival et al. 2010) and WiggleZ (Blake et al. 2011). We refer to our companion papers (Ho et al. 2011; de Putter et al. 2011) for investigations on information of the full power spectrum.
  • The baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the clustering of matter in the universe serves as a robust standard ruler and hence can be used to map the expansion history of the universe. We use high force resolution simulations to analyze the effects of galaxy bias on the measurements of the BAO signal. We apply a variety of Halo Occupation Distributions (HODs) and produce biased mass tracers to mimic different galaxy populations. We investigate whether galaxy bias changes the non-linear shifts on the acoustic scale relative to the underlying dark matter distribution presented by Seo et al (2009). For the less biased HOD models (b < 3), we do not detect any shift in the acoustic scale relative to the no-bias case, typically 0.10% \pm 0.10%. However, the most biased HOD models (b > 3) show a shift at moderate significance (0.79% \pm 0.31% for the most extreme case). We test the one-step reconstruction technique introduced by Eisenstein et al. (2007) in the case of realistic galaxy bias and shot noise. The reconstruction scheme increases the correlation between the initial and final (z = 1) density fields achieving an equivalent level of correlation at nearly twice the wavenumber after reconstruction. Reconstruction reduces the shifts and errors on the shifts. We find that after reconstruction the shifts from the galaxy cases and the dark matter case are consistent with each other and with no shift. The 1-sigma systematic errors on the distance measurements inferred from our BAO measurements with various HODs after reconstruction are about 0.07% - 0.15%.
  • We measure shifts of the acoustic scale due to nonlinear growth and redshift distortions to a high precision using a very large volume of high-force-resolution simulations. We compare results from various sets of simulations that differ in their force, volume, and mass resolution. We find a consistency within 1.5-sigma for shift values from different simulations and derive shift alpha(z) -1 = (0.300\pm 0.015)% [D(z)/D(0)]^{2} using our fiducial set. We find a strong correlation with a non-unity slope between shifts in real space and in redshift space and a weak correlation between the initial redshift and low redshift. Density-field reconstruction not only removes the mean shifts and reduces errors on the mean, but also tightens the correlations: after reconstruction, we recover a slope of near unity for the correlation between the real and redshift space and restore a strong correlation between the low and the initial redshifts. We derive propagators and mode-coupling terms from our N-body simulations and compared with Zeldovich approximation and the shifts measured from the chi^2 fitting, respectively. We interpret the propagator and the mode-coupling term of a nonlinear density field in the context of an average and a dispersion of its complex Fourier coefficients relative to those of the linear density field; from these two terms, we derive a signal-to-noise ratio of the acoustic peak measurement. We attempt to improve our reconstruction method by implementing 2LPT and iterative operations: we obtain little improvement. The Fisher matrix estimates of uncertainty in the acoustic scale is tested using 5000 (Gpc/h)^3 of cosmological PM simulations from Takahashi et al. (2009). (abridged)
  • The properties of accretion disks around stars and brown dwarfs in the SOri cluster (age 3 Myr) are studied based on NIR time series photometry supported by MIR spectral energy distributions. We monitor ~30 young low-mass sources over 8 nights in the J- and K-band using the duPont telescope at Las Campanas. We find three objects showing variability with J-band amplitudes >0.5 mag; five additional objects exhibit low-level variations. All three highly variable sources have been previously identified as highly variable; thus we establish the long-term nature of their flux changes. The lightcurves contain periodic components with timescales of ~0.5-8 days, but have additional irregular variations superimposed -- the characteristic behaviour for classical T Tauri stars. Based on the colour variability, we conclude that hot spots are the dominant cause of the variations in two objects, including one likely brown dwarf, with spot temperatures in the range of 6000-7000 K. For the third one (#2), a brown dwarf or very low mass star, inhomogenities at the inner edge of the disk are the likely origin of the variability. Based on mid-infrared data from Spitzer, we confirm that the three highly variable sources are surrounded by circum-(sub)-stellar disks. They show typical SEDs for T Tauri-like objects. Using SED models we infer an enhanced scaleheight in the disk for the object #2, which favours the detection of disk inhomogenities in lightcurves and is thus consistent with the information from variability. In the SOri cluster, about every fifth accreting low-mass object shows persistent high-level photometric variability. We demonstrate that estimates for fundamental parameters in such objects can be significantly improved by determining the extent and origin of the variations.