• Depending on its geometry, a spherical shell may exist in one of two stable states without the application of any external force: there are two `self-equilibrated' states, one natural and the other inside out (or `everted'). Though this is familiar from everyday life -- an umbrella is remarkably stable, yet a contact lens can be easily turned inside out -- the precise shell geometries for which bistability is possible are not known. Here, we use experiments and finite element simulations to determine the threshold between bistability and monostability for shells of different solid angle. We compare these results with the prediction from shallow shell theory, showing that, when appropriately modified, this offers a very good account of bistability even for relatively deep shells. We then investigate the robustness of this bistability against pointwise indentation. We find that indentation provides a continuous route for transition between the two states for shells whose geometry makes them close to the threshold. However, for thinner shells, indentation leads to asymmetrical buckling before snap-through, while also making these shells more `robust' to snap-through. Our work sheds new light on the robustness of the `mirror buckling' symmetry of spherical shell caps.
  • Bistable shells can reversibly change between two stable configurations with very little energetic input. Understanding what governs the shape and snap-through criteria of these structures is crucial for designing devices that utilize instability for functionality. Bistable cylindrical shells fabricated by stretching and bonding multiple layers of elastic plates will contain residual stress that will impact the shell's shape and the magnitude of stimulus necessary to induce snapping. Using the framework of non-Euclidean shell theory, we first predict the mean curvature of a nearly cylindrical shell formed by arbitrarily prestretching one layer of a bilayer plate with respect to another. Then, beginning with a residually stressed cylinder, we determine the amount of the stimuli needed to trigger the snapping between two configurations through a combination of numerical simulations and theory. We demonstrate the role of prestress on the snap-through criteria, and highlight the important role that the Gaussian curvature in the boundary layer of the shell plays in dictating shell stability.
  • In this paper, we propose to study the problem of COURT VIEW GENeration from the fact description in a criminal case. The task aims to improve the interpretability of charge prediction systems and help automatic legal document generation. We formulate this task as a text-to-text natural language generation (NLG) problem. Sequenceto-sequence model has achieved cutting-edge performances in many NLG tasks. However, due to the non-distinctions of fact descriptions, it is hard for Seq2Seq model to generate charge-discriminative court views. In this work, we explore charge labels to tackle this issue. We propose a label-conditioned Seq2Seq model with attention for this problem, to decode court views conditioned on encoded charge labels. Experimental results show the effectiveness of our method.
  • Sparse linear inverse problems appear in a variety of settings, but often the noise contaminating observations cannot accurately be described as bounded by or arising from a Gaussian distribution. Poisson observations in particular are a feature of several real-world applications. Previous work on sparse Poisson inverse problems encountered several limiting technical hurdles. This paper describes a novel alternative analysis approach for sparse Poisson inverse problems that (a) sidesteps the technical challenges in previous work, (b) admits estimators that can readily be computed using off-the-shelf LASSO algorithms, and (c) hints at a general framework for broad classes of noise in sparse linear inverse problems. At the heart of this new approach lies a weighted LASSO estimator for which data-dependent weights are based on Poisson concentration inequalities. Unlike previous analyses of the weighted LASSO, the proposed analysis depends on conditions which can be checked or shown to hold in general settings with high probability.
  • Battery-like supercapacitors feature high power and energy densities as well as long-term capacitance retention. The utilized capacitor electrodes are thus better to have large surface areas, high conductivity, high stability, and importantly be of binder free. Herein, vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) coated boron-doped diamonds (BDD) are employed as the capacitor electrodes to construct battery-like supercapacitors. Grown via a thermal chemical vapor deposition technique, these CNFs/BDD hybrid films are binder free and own porous structures, resulting in large surface areas. Meanwhile, the containment of graphene layers and copper metal catalysts inside CNFs/BDD leads to their high conductivity. Electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) and pseudocapacitors (PCs) are then constructed in the inert electrolyte (1.0 M H2SO4 solution) and in the redox-active electrolyte (1.0 M Na2SO4 + 0.05 M Fe(CN)63-/4-), respectively. For assembled two-electrode symmetrical supercapacitor devices, the capacitances of EDLC and PC devices reach 30 and 48 mF cm-2 at 10 mV s-1, respectively. They remain constant even after 10 000 cycles. The power densities are 27.3 kW kg-1 and 25.3 kW kg-1 for EDLC and PC devices, together with their energy densities of 22.9 Wh kg-1 and 44.1 Wh kg-1, respectively. The performance of formed EDLC and PC devices is comparable to market-available batteries. Therefore, the vertically aligned CNFs/BDD hybrid film is a suitable capacitor electrode material to construct high-performance battery-like and industry-orientated supercapacitors for flexible power devices.
  • Automatic generation of paraphrases from a given sentence is an important yet challenging task in natural language processing (NLP), and plays a key role in a number of applications such as question answering, search, and dialogue. In this paper, we present a deep reinforcement learning approach to paraphrase generation. Specifically, we propose a new framework for the task, which consists of a \textit{generator} and an \textit{evaluator}, both of which are learned from data. The generator, built as a sequence-to-sequence learning model, can produce paraphrases given a sentence. The evaluator, constructed as a deep matching model, can judge whether two sentences are paraphrases of each other. The generator is first trained by deep learning and then further fine-tuned by reinforcement learning in which the reward is given by the evaluator. For the learning of the evaluator, we propose two methods based on supervised learning and inverse reinforcement learning respectively, depending on the type of available training data. Empirical study shows that the learned evaluator can guide the generator to produce more accurate paraphrases. Experimental results demonstrate the proposed models (the generators) outperform the state-of-the-art methods in paraphrase generation in both automatic evaluation and human evaluation.
  • Since its discovery in 2002, the chimera state has frequently been described as a counter-intuitive, puzzling phenomenon. The Kuramoto model, in contrast, has become a celebrated paradigm useful for understanding a range of phenomena related to phase transitions, synchronization and network effects. Here we show that the chimera state can be understood as emerging naturally through a symmetry breaking bifurcation from the Kuramoto model's partially synchronized state. Our analysis sheds light on recent observations of chimera states in laser arrays, chemical oscillators, and mechanical pendula.
  • Existing neural conversational models process natural language primarily on a lexico-syntactic level, thereby ignoring one of the most crucial components of human-to-human dialogue: its affective content. We take a step in this direction by proposing three novel ways to incorporate affective/emotional aspects into long short term memory (LSTM) encoder-decoder neural conversation models: (1) affective word embeddings, which are cognitively engineered, (2) affect-based objective functions that augment the standard cross-entropy loss, and (3) affectively diverse beam search for decoding. Experiments show that these techniques improve the open-domain conversational prowess of encoder-decoder networks by enabling them to produce emotionally rich responses that are more interesting and natural.
  • We propose an online, end-to-end, neural generative conversational model for open-domain dialogue. It is trained using a unique combination of offline two-phase supervised learning and online human-in-the-loop active learning. While most existing research proposes offline supervision or hand-crafted reward functions for online reinforcement, we devise a novel interactive learning mechanism based on hamming-diverse beam search for response generation and one-character user-feedback at each step. Experiments show that our model inherently promotes the generation of semantically relevant and interesting responses, and can be used to train agents with customized personas, moods and conversational styles.
  • We investigate how thin structures change their shape in response to non-mechanical stimuli that can be interpreted as variations in the structure's natural curvature. Starting from the theory of non-Euclidean plates and shells, we derive an effective model that reduces a three-dimensional stimulus to the natural fundamental forms of the mid-surface of the structure, incorporating expansion, or growth, in the thickness. Then, we apply the model to a variety of thin bodies, from flat plates to spherical shells, obtaining excellent agreement between theory and numerics. We show how cylinders and cones can either bend more or unroll, and eventually snap and rotate. We also study the nearly-isometric deformations of a spherical shell and describe how this shape change is ruled by the geometry of a spindle. As the derived results stem from a purely geometrical model, they are general and scalable.
  • To improve national security, government agencies have long been committed to enforcing powerful surveillance measures on suspicious individuals or communications. In this paper, we consider a wireless legitimate surveillance system, where a full-duplex multi-antenna legitimate monitor aims to eavesdrop on a dubious communication link between a suspicious pair via proactive jamming. Assuming that the legitimate monitor can successfully overhear the suspicious information only when its achievable data rate is no smaller than that of the suspicious receiver, the key objective is to maximize the eavesdropping non-outage probability by joint design of the jamming power, receive and transmit beamformers at the legitimate monitor. Depending on the number of receive/transmit antennas implemented, i.e., single-input single-output, single-input multiple-output, multiple-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), four different scenarios are investigated. For each scenario, the optimal jamming power is derived in closed-form and efficient algorithms are obtained for the optimal transmit/receive beamforming vectors. Moreover, low-complexity suboptimal beamforming schemes are proposed for the MIMO case. Our analytical findings demonstrate that by exploiting multiple antennas at the legitimate monitor, the eavesdropping non-outage probability can be significantly improved compared to the single antenna case. In addition, the proposed suboptimal transmit zero-forcing scheme yields similar performance as the optimal scheme.
  • This paper investigates the performance of a legitimate surveillance system, where a legitimate monitor aims to eavesdrop on a dubious decode-and-forward relaying communication link. In order to maximize the effective eavesdropping rate, two strategies are proposed, where the legitimate monitor adaptively acts as an eavesdropper, a jammer or a helper. In addition, the corresponding optimal jamming beamformer and jamming power are presented. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed strategies attain better performance compared with intuitive benchmark schemes. Moreover, it is revealed that the position of the legitimate monitor plays an important role on the eavesdropping performance for the two strategies.
  • In an era of ubiquitous large-scale streaming data, the availability of data far exceeds the capacity of expert human analysts. In many settings, such data is either discarded or stored unprocessed in datacenters. This paper proposes a method of online data thinning, in which large-scale streaming datasets are winnowed to preserve unique, anomalous, or salient elements for timely expert analysis. At the heart of this proposed approach is an online anomaly detection method based on dynamic, low-rank Gaussian mixture models. Specifically, the high-dimensional covariances matrices associated with the Gaussian components are associated with low-rank models. According to this model, most observations lie near a union of subspaces. The low-rank modeling mitigates the curse of dimensionality associated with anomaly detection for high-dimensional data, and recent advances in subspace clustering and subspace tracking allow the proposed method to adapt to dynamic environments. Furthermore, the proposed method allows subsampling, is robust to missing data, and uses a mini-batch online optimization approach. The resulting algorithms are scalable, efficient, and are capable of operating in real time. Experiments on wide-area motion imagery and e-mail databases illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach.
  • When identical oscillators are coupled together in a network, dynamical steady states are often assumed to reflect network symmetries. Here we show that alternative persistent states may also exist that break the symmetries of the underlying coupling network. We further show that these symmetry-broken coexistent states are analogous to those dubbed "chimera states," which can occur when identical oscillators are coupled to one another in identical ways.
  • Financial markets have been extensively studied as highly complex evolving systems. In this paper, we quantify financial price fluctuations through a coupled dynamical system composed of phase oscillators. We find a Financial Coherence and Incoherence (FCI) coexistence collective behavior emerges as the system evolves into the stable state, in which the stocks split into two groups: one is represented by coherent, phase-locked oscillators, the other is composed of incoherent, drifting oscillators. It is demonstrated that the size of the coherent stock groups fluctuates during the economic periods according to real-world financial instabilities or shocks. Further, we introduce the coherent characteristic matrix to characterize the involvement dynamics of stocks in the coherent groups. Clustering results on the matrix provides a novel manifestation of the correlations among stocks in the economic periods. Our analysis for components of the groups is consistent with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS) classification and can also figure out features for newly developed industries. These results can provide potentially implications on characterizing inner dynamical structure of financial markets and making optimal investment tragedies.
  • This paper presents an end-to-end neural network model, named Neural Generative Question Answering (GENQA), that can generate answers to simple factoid questions, based on the facts in a knowledge-base. More specifically, the model is built on the encoder-decoder framework for sequence-to-sequence learning, while equipped with the ability to enquire the knowledge-base, and is trained on a corpus of question-answer pairs, with their associated triples in the knowledge-base. Empirical study shows the proposed model can effectively deal with the variations of questions and answers, and generate right and natural answers by referring to the facts in the knowledge-base. The experiment on question answering demonstrates that the proposed model can outperform an embedding-based QA model as well as a neural dialogue model trained on the same data.
  • The relevance between a query and a document in search can be represented as matching degree between the two objects. Latent space models have been proven to be effective for the task, which are often trained with click-through data. One technical challenge with the approach is that it is hard to train a model for tail queries and tail documents for which there are not enough clicks. In this paper, we propose to address the challenge by learning a latent matching model, using not only click-through data but also semantic knowledge. The semantic knowledge can be categories of queries and documents as well as synonyms of words, manually or automatically created. Specifically, we incorporate semantic knowledge into the objective function by including regularization terms. We develop two methods to solve the learning task on the basis of coordinate descent and gradient descent respectively, which can be employed in different settings. Experimental results on two datasets from an app search engine demonstrate that our model can make effective use of semantic knowledge, and thus can significantly enhance the accuracies of latent matching models, particularly for tail queries.
  • The evolution of network structure and the spreading of epidemic are common coexistent dynamical processes. In most cases, network structure is treated either static or time-varying, supposing the whole network is observed in a same time window. In this paper, we consider the epidemic spreading on a network consisting of both static and time-varying structures. At meanwhile, the time-varying part and the epidemic spreading are supposed to be of the same time scale. We introduce a static and activity driven coupling (SADC) network model to characterize the coupling between static (strong) structure and dynamic (weak) structure. Epidemic thresholds of SIS and SIR model are studied on SADC both analytically and numerically with various coupling strategies, where the strong structure is of homogeneous or heterogeneous degree distribution. Theoretical thresholds obtained from SADC model can both recover and generalize the classical results in static and time-varying networks. It is demonstrated that weak structures can make the epidemics break out much more easily in homogeneous coupling but harder in heterogeneous coupling when keeping same average degree in SADC networks. Furthermore, we show there exists a threshold ratio of the weak structure to have substantive effects on the breakout of the epidemics. This promotes our understanding of why epidemics can still break out in some social networks even we restrict the flow of the population.
  • The spin Hall effect (SHE) converts charge current to pure spin currents in orthogonal directions in materials that have significant spin-orbit coupling.The efficiency of the conversion is described by the spin Hall Angle (SHA). The SHA can most readily be inferred by using the generated spin currents to excite or rotate the magnetization of ferromagnetic films or nano-elements via spin-transfer torques.Some of the largest spin torque derived spin Hall angles (ST-SHA) have been reported in platinum. Here we show, using spin torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) measurements, that the transparency of the Pt-ferromagnet interface to the spin current plays a central role in determining the magnitude of the ST-SHA. We measure a much larger ST-SHA in Pt/cobalt (~0.11) compared to Pt/permalloy (~0.05) bilayers when the interfaces are assumed to be completely transparent. Taking into account the transparency of these interfaces, as derived from spin-mixing conductances, we find that the intrinsic SHA in platinum has a much higher value of 0.19 +- 0.04 as compared to the ST-SHA. The importance of the interface transparency is further exemplified by the insertion of atomically thin magnetic layers at the Pt/permalloy interface that we show strongly modulates the magnitude of the ST-SHA.
  • Aiming at a unified phase transition picture of the charged topological black hole in Ho\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity, we investigate this issue not only in canonical ensemble with the fixed charge case but also in grand-canonical ensemble with the fixed potential case. We firstly perform the standard analysis of the specific heat, the free energy and the Gibbs potential, and then study its geometrothermodynamics. It is shown that the local phase transition points not only witness the divergence of the specific heat, but also witness the minimum temperature and the maximum free energy or Gibbs potential. They also witness the divergence of the corresponding thermodynamic scalar curvature. No matter which ensemble is chosen, the metric constructed can successfully produce the behavior of the thermodynamic interaction and phase transition structure while other metrics failed to predict the phase transition point of the charged topological black hole in former literature. In grand-canonical ensemble, we have discovered the phase transition which has not been reported before. It is similar to the canonical ensemble in which the phase transition only takes place when $k=-1$. But it also has its unique characteristics that the location of the phase transition point depends on the value of potential, which is different from the canonical ensemble where the phase transition point is independent of the parameters. After an analytical check of Ehrenfest scheme, we find that the new phase transition is a second order one. It is also found that the thermodynamics of the black hole in Horava-Lifshitz gravity is quite different from that in Einstein gravity.
  • This paper considers fundamental limits for solving sparse inverse problems in the presence of Poisson noise with physical constraints. Such problems arise in a variety of applications, including photon-limited imaging systems based on compressed sensing. Most prior theoretical results in compressed sensing and related inverse problems apply to idealized settings where the noise is i.i.d., and do not account for signal-dependent noise and physical sensing constraints. Prior results on Poisson compressed sensing with signal-dependent noise and physical constraints provided upper bounds on mean squared error performance for a specific class of estimators. However, it was unknown whether those bounds were tight or if other estimators could achieve significantly better performance. This work provides minimax lower bounds on mean-squared error for sparse Poisson inverse problems under physical constraints. Our lower bounds are complemented by minimax upper bounds. Our upper and lower bounds reveal that due to the interplay between the Poisson noise model, the sparsity constraint and the physical constraints: (i) the mean-squared error does not depend on the sample size $n$ other than to ensure the sensing matrix satisfies RIP-like conditions and the intensity $T$ of the input signal plays a critical role; and (ii) the mean-squared error has two distinct regimes, a low-intensity and a high-intensity regime and the transition point from the low-intensity to high-intensity regime depends on the input signal $f^*$. In the low-intensity regime the mean-squared error is independent of $T$ while in the high-intensity regime, the mean-squared error scales as $\frac{s \log p}{T}$, where $s$ is the sparsity level, $p$ is the number of pixels or parameters and $T$ is the signal intensity.
  • The contact mechanics of individual, very small particles with other particles and walls is studied using a nanoindenter setup that allows normal and lateral displacement control and measurement of the respective forces. The sliding, rolling and torsional forces and torques are tested with borosilicate microspheres, featuring radii of about 10$\mu$m. The contacts are with flat silicon substrates of different roughness for pure sliding and rolling and with silicon based, ion-beam crafted rail systems for combined rolling and torsion. The experimental results are discussed and compared to various analytical predictions and contact models, allowing for two concurrent interpretations of the effects of surface roughness, plasticity and adhesion. This enables us to determine both rolling and torsion friction coefficients together with their associated length scales. Interestingly, even though normal contacts behave elastically (Hertzian), all other modes of motion display effects due to surface roughness and consequent plastic deformation. The influence of adhesion is interpreted in the framework of different models and is very different for different degrees of freedom, being largest for rolling.
  • There has been much interest in the injection and detection of spin polarized carriers in semiconductors for the purposes of developing novel spintronic devices. Here we report the electrical injection and detection of spin-polarized carriers into Nb-doped strontium titanate (STO) single crystals and La-doped STO epitaxial thin films using MgO tunnel barriers and the three-terminal Hanle technique. Spin lifetimes of up to ~100 ps are measured at room temperature and vary little as the temperature is decreased to low temperatures. However, the mobility of the STO has a strong temperature dependence. This behavior and the carrier doping dependence of the spin lifetime suggest that the spin lifetime is limited by spin-dependent scattering at the MgO/STO interfaces, perhaps related to the formation of doping induced Ti3+. Our results reveal a severe limitation of the three-terminal Hanle technique for measuring spin lifetimes within the interior of the subject material.
  • Atmospheric aerosols can cause serious damage to human health and life expectancy. Using the radiances observed by NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), the current MISR operational algorithm retrieves Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at a spatial resolution of 17.6 km x 17.6 km. A systematic study of aerosols and their impact on public health, especially in highly-populated urban areas, requires a finer-resolution estimate of the spatial distribution of AOD values. We embed MISR's operational weighted least squares criterion and its forward simulations for AOD retrieval in a likelihood framework and further expand it into a Bayesian hierarchical model to adapt to a finer spatial scale of 4.4 km x 4.4 km. To take advantage of AOD's spatial smoothness, our method borrows strength from data at neighboring pixels by postulating a Gaussian Markov Random Field prior for AOD. Our model considers both AOD and aerosol mixing vectors as continuous variables. The inference of AOD and mixing vectors is carried out using Metropolis-within-Gibbs sampling methods. Retrieval uncertainties are quantified by posterior variabilities. We also implement a parallel MCMC algorithm to reduce computational cost. We assess our retrievals performance using ground-based measurements from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a hand-held sunphotometer and satellite images from Google Earth. Based on case studies in the greater Beijing area, China, we show that a 4.4 km resolution can improve the accuracy and coverage of remotely-sensed aerosol retrievals, as well as our understanding of the spatial and seasonal behaviors of aerosols. This improvement is particularly important during high-AOD events, which often indicate severe air pollution.
  • Thermal-magnetic noise at ferromagnetic resonance (T-FMR) can be used to measure magnetic perpendicular anisotropy of nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). For this purpose, T-FMR measurements were conducted with an external magnetic field up to 14 kOe applied perpendicular to the film surface of MgO-based MTJs under a dc bias. The observed frequency-field relationship suggests that a 20 A CoFeB free layer has an effective demagnetization field much smaller than the intrinsic bulk value of CoFeB, with 4PiMeff = (6.1 +/- 0.3) kOe. This value is consistent with the saturation field obtained from magnetometry measurements on extended films of the same CoFeB thickness. In-plane T-FMR on the other hand shows less consistent results for the effective demagnetization field, presumably due to excitations of more complex modes. These experiments suggest that the perpendicular T-FMR is preferred for quantitative magnetic characterization of nanoscale MTJs.