• In this paper, we propose a fully distributed continuous-time algorithm to solve the distributed optimization problem for second-order multi-agent systems. The optimization objective function is a sum of private cost functions associated to the individual agents and the interaction between agents is described by a weighted undirected graph. We show the exponential convergence of the proposed algorithm if the underlying graph is connected and the private cost functions are strongly convex and have locally Lipschitz gradients. Moreover, to reduce the overall need of communication, we then propose a dynamic event-triggered communication scheme that is free of Zeno behavior. It is shown that the exponential convergence is achieved if the private cost functions are globally Lipschitz. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.
  • In this paper, event-triggered controllers and corresponding algorithms are proposed to establish the formation with connectivity preservation for multi-agent systems. Each agent needs to update its control input and to broadcast this control input together with the relative state information to its neighbors at its own triggering times, and to receive information at its neighbors' triggering times. Two types of system dynamics, single integrators and double integrators, are considered. As a result, all agents converge to the formation exponentially with connectivity preservation, and Zeno behavior can be excluded. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.
  • We consider the global consensus problem for multi-agent systems with input saturation over digraphs. Under a mild connectivity condition that the underlying digraph has a directed spanning tree, we use Lyapunov methods to show that the widely used distributed consensus protocol, which solves the consensus problem for the case without input saturation constraints, also solves the global consensus problem for the case with input saturation constraints. In order to reduce the overall need of communication and system updates, we then propose a distributed event-triggered control law. Global consensus is still realized and Zeno behavior is excluded. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.
  • We propose two distributed dynamic triggering laws to solve the consensus problem for multi-agent systems with event-triggered control. Compared with existing triggering laws, the proposed triggering laws involve internal dynamic variables which play an essential role to guarantee that the triggering time sequence does not exhibit Zeno behavior. Some existing triggering laws are special cases of our dynamic triggering laws. Under the condition that the underlying graph is undirected and connected, it is proven that the proposed dynamic triggering laws together with the event-triggered control make the state of each agent converges exponentially to the average of the agents' initial states. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and show that the dynamic triggering laws lead to reduction of actuation updates and inter-agent communications.
  • This paper studies multi-agent systems with nonlinear consensus protocols, i.e., only nonlinear measurements of the states are available to agents. The solutions of these systems are understood in Filippov sense since the possible discontinuity of the nonlinear controllers. Under the condition that the nonlinear functions are monotonic increasing without any continuous constraints, asymptotic stability is derived for systems defines on both directed and undirected graphs. The results can be applied to quantized consensus which extend some existing results from undirected graphs to directed ones.
  • The consensus problem for multi-agent systems with quantized communication or sensing is considered. Centralized and distributed self-triggered rules are proposed to reduce the overall need of communication and system updates. It is proved that these self-triggered rules realize consensus exponentially if the network topologies have a spanning tree and the quantization function is uniform. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.
  • Two types of general nonlinear consensus protocols are considered in this paper, namely the systems with nonlinear measurement and communication of the agents' states, respectively. The solutions of the systems are understood in the sense of Filippov to handle the possible discontinuity of the nonlinear functions. For each case, we prove the asymptotic stability of the systems defined on both directed and undirected graphs. Then we reinterpret the results about the general models for a specific type of systems, i.e., the quantized consensus protocols, which extend some existing results (e.g., [1,2]) from undirected graphs to directed ones.
  • In this paper, we investigate stability of a class of analytic neural networks with the synaptic feedback via event-triggered rules. This model is general and include Hopfield neural network as a special case. These event-trigger rules can efficiently reduces loads of computation and information transmission at synapses of the neurons. The synaptic feedback of each neuron keeps a constant value based on the outputs of the other neurons at its latest triggering time but changes at its next triggering time, which is determined by certain criterion. It is proved that every trajectory of the analytic neural network converges to certain equilibrium under this event-triggered rule for all initial values except a set of zero measure. The main technique of the proof is the Lojasiewicz inequality to prove the finiteness of trajectory length. The realization of this event-triggered rule is verified by the exclusion of Zeno behaviors. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the theoretical results.
  • Active cyber defense is one important defensive method for combating cyber attacks. Unlike traditional defensive methods such as firewall-based filtering and anti-malware tools, active cyber defense is based on spreading "white" or "benign" worms to combat against the attackers' malwares (i.e., malicious worms) that also spread over the network. In this paper, we initiate the study of {\em optimal} active cyber defense in the setting of strategic attackers and/or strategic defenders. Specifically, we investigate infinite-time horizon optimal control and fast optimal control for strategic defenders (who want to minimize their cost) against non-strategic attackers (who do not consider the issue of cost). We also investigate the Nash equilibria for strategic defenders and attackers. We discuss the cyber security meanings/implications of the theoretic results. Our study brings interesting open problems for future research.
  • In this paper, we investigate convergence of a class of analytic neural networks with event-triggered rule. This model is general and include Hopfield neural network as a special case. The event-trigger rule efficiently reduces the frequency of information transmission between synapses of the neurons. The synaptic feedback of each neuron keeps a constant value based on the outputs of its neighbours at its latest triggering time but changes until the next triggering time of this neuron that is determined by certain criterion via its neighborhood information. It is proved that the analytic neural network is completely stable under this event-triggered rule. The main technique of proof is the ${\L}$ojasiewicz inequality to prove the finiteness of trajectory length. The realization of this event-triggered rule is verified by the exclusion of Zeno behaviors. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the theoretical results and present the optimisation capability of the network dynamics.
  • This paper mainly investigates consensus problem with pull-based event-triggered feedback control. For each agent, the diffusion coupling feedbacks are based on the states of its in-neighbors at its latest triggering time and the next triggering time of this agent is determined by its in-neighbors' information as well. The general directed topologies, including irreducible and reducible cases, are investigated. The scenario of distributed continuous monitoring is considered firstly, namely each agent can observe its in-neighbors' continuous states. It is proved that if the network topology has a spanning tree, then the event-triggered coupling strategy can realize consensus for the multi-agent system. Then the results are extended to discontinuous monitoring, i.e., self-triggered control, where each agent computes its next triggering time in advance without having to observe the system's states continuously. The effectiveness of the theoretical results are illustrated by a numerical example finally.
  • In this paper, we study consensus problem in multi-agent system with directed topology by event-triggered feedback control. That is, at each agent, the diffusion coupling feedbacks are based on the information from its latest observations to its in-neighbours. We derive distributed criteria to determine the next observation time of each agent that are triggered by its in-neighbours' information and its own states respectively. We prove that if the network topology is irreducible, then under the event-triggered coupling principles, the multi-agent system reach consensus. Then, we extend these results to the case of reducible topology with spanning tree. In addition, these results are also extended to the case of self-triggered control, in terms that the next triggering time of each agent is computed based on the current states, i.e., without observing the system's states continuously. The effectiveness of the theoretical results are illustrated by numerical examples.
  • This paper studies the consensus problem of multi-agent systems with asymmetric and reducible topologies. Centralized event-triggered rules are provided so as to reduce the frequency of system's updating. The diffusion coupling feedbacks of each agent are based on the latest observations from its in-neighbors and the system's next observation time is triggered by a criterion based on all agents' information. The scenario of continuous monitoring is first considered, namely all agents' instantaneous states can be observed. It is proved that if the network topology has a spanning tree, then the centralized event-triggered coupling strategy can realize consensus for the multi-agent system. Then the results are extended to discontinuous monitoring, where the system computes its next triggering time in advance without having to observe all agents' states continuously. Examples with numerical simulation are provided to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.
  • In this paper, we study complete synchronization of the complex dynamical networks described by linearly coupled ordinary differential equation systems (LCODEs). The coupling considered here is time-varying in both the network structure and the reaction dynamics. Inspired by our previous paper [6], the extended Hajnal diameter is introduced and used to measure the synchronization in a general differential system. Then we find that the Hajnal diameter of the linear system induced by the time-varying coupling matrix and the largest Lyapunov exponent of the synchronized system play the key roles in synchronization analysis of LCODEs with the identity inner coupling matrix. As an application, we obtain a general sufficient condition guaranteeing directed time-varying graph to reach consensus. Example with numerical simulation is provided to show the effectiveness the theoretical results.