• Binary embedding is a nonlinear dimension reduction methodology where high dimensional data are embedded into the Hamming cube while preserving the structure of the original space. Specifically, for an arbitrary $N$ distinct points in $\mathbb{S}^{p-1}$, our goal is to encode each point using $m$-dimensional binary strings such that we can reconstruct their geodesic distance up to $\delta$ uniform distortion. Existing binary embedding algorithms either lack theoretical guarantees or suffer from running time $O\big(mp\big)$. We make three contributions: (1) we establish a lower bound that shows any binary embedding oblivious to the set of points requires $m = \Omega(\frac{1}{\delta^2}\log{N})$ bits and a similar lower bound for non-oblivious embeddings into Hamming distance; (2) [DELETED, see comment]; (3) we also provide an analytic result about embedding a general set of points $K \subseteq \mathbb{S}^{p-1}$ with even infinite size. Our theoretical findings are supported through experiments on both synthetic and real data sets.
  • We consider the problem of Robust PCA in the fully and partially observed settings. Without corruptions, this is the well-known matrix completion problem. From a statistical standpoint this problem has been recently well-studied, and conditions on when recovery is possible (how many observations do we need, how many corruptions can we tolerate) via polynomial-time algorithms is by now understood. This paper presents and analyzes a non-convex optimization approach that greatly reduces the computational complexity of the above problems, compared to the best available algorithms. In particular, in the fully observed case, with $r$ denoting rank and $d$ dimension, we reduce the complexity from $\mathcal{O}(r^2d^2\log(1/\varepsilon))$ to $\mathcal{O}(rd^2\log(1/\varepsilon))$ -- a big savings when the rank is big. For the partially observed case, we show the complexity of our algorithm is no more than $\mathcal{O}(r^4d \log d \log(1/\varepsilon))$. Not only is this the best-known run-time for a provable algorithm under partial observation, but in the setting where $r$ is small compared to $d$, it also allows for near-linear-in-$d$ run-time that can be exploited in the fully-observed case as well, by simply running our algorithm on a subset of the observations.
  • We consider the problem of solving mixed random linear equations with $k$ components. This is the noiseless setting of mixed linear regression. The goal is to estimate multiple linear models from mixed samples in the case where the labels (which sample corresponds to which model) are not observed. We give a tractable algorithm for the mixed linear equation problem, and show that under some technical conditions, our algorithm is guaranteed to solve the problem exactly with sample complexity linear in the dimension, and polynomial in $k$, the number of components. Previous approaches have required either exponential dependence on $k$, or super-linear dependence on the dimension. The proposed algorithm is a combination of tensor decomposition and alternating minimization. Our analysis involves proving that the initialization provided by the tensor method allows alternating minimization, which is equivalent to EM in our setting, to converge to the global optimum at a linear rate.
  • Latent variable models are a fundamental modeling tool in machine learning applications, but they present significant computational and analytical challenges. The popular EM algorithm and its variants, is a much used algorithmic tool; yet our rigorous understanding of its performance is highly incomplete. Recently, work in Balakrishnan et al. (2014) has demonstrated that for an important class of problems, EM exhibits linear local convergence. In the high-dimensional setting, however, the M-step may not be well defined. We address precisely this setting through a unified treatment using regularization. While regularization for high-dimensional problems is by now well understood, the iterative EM algorithm requires a careful balancing of making progress towards the solution while identifying the right structure (e.g., sparsity or low-rank). In particular, regularizing the M-step using the state-of-the-art high-dimensional prescriptions (e.g., Wainwright (2014)) is not guaranteed to provide this balance. Our algorithm and analysis are linked in a way that reveals the balance between optimization and statistical errors. We specialize our general framework to sparse gaussian mixture models, high-dimensional mixed regression, and regression with missing variables, obtaining statistical guarantees for each of these examples.
  • Linear regression studies the problem of estimating a model parameter $\beta^* \in \mathbb{R}^p$, from $n$ observations $\{(y_i,\mathbf{x}_i)\}_{i=1}^n$ from linear model $y_i = \langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle + \epsilon_i$. We consider a significant generalization in which the relationship between $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$ and $y_i$ is noisy, quantized to a single bit, potentially nonlinear, noninvertible, as well as unknown. This model is known as the single-index model in statistics, and, among other things, it represents a significant generalization of one-bit compressed sensing. We propose a novel spectral-based estimation procedure and show that we can recover $\beta^*$ in settings (i.e., classes of link function $f$) where previous algorithms fail. In general, our algorithm requires only very mild restrictions on the (unknown) functional relationship between $y_i$ and $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$. We also consider the high dimensional setting where $\beta^*$ is sparse ,and introduce a two-stage nonconvex framework that addresses estimation challenges in high dimensional regimes where $p \gg n$. For a broad class of link functions between $\langle \mathbf{x}_i,\beta^* \rangle$ and $y_i$, we establish minimax lower bounds that demonstrate the optimality of our estimators in both the classical and high dimensional regimes.
  • We consider the mixed regression problem with two components, under adversarial and stochastic noise. We give a convex optimization formulation that provably recovers the true solution, and provide upper bounds on the recovery errors for both arbitrary noise and stochastic noise settings. We also give matching minimax lower bounds (up to log factors), showing that under certain assumptions, our algorithm is information-theoretically optimal. Our results represent the first tractable algorithm guaranteeing successful recovery with tight bounds on recovery errors and sample complexity.
  • Mixed linear regression involves the recovery of two (or more) unknown vectors from unlabeled linear measurements; that is, where each sample comes from exactly one of the vectors, but we do not know which one. It is a classic problem, and the natural and empirically most popular approach to its solution has been the EM algorithm. As in other settings, this is prone to bad local minima; however, each iteration is very fast (alternating between guessing labels, and solving with those labels). In this paper we provide a new initialization procedure for EM, based on finding the leading two eigenvectors of an appropriate matrix. We then show that with this, a re-sampled version of the EM algorithm provably converges to the correct vectors, under natural assumptions on the sampling distribution, and with nearly optimal (unimprovable) sample complexity. This provides not only the first characterization of EM's performance, but also much lower sample complexity as compared to both standard (randomly initialized) EM, and other methods for this problem.